Report of the Provost s Committee on Entrepreneurial Programs

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "Report of the Provost s Committee on Entrepreneurial Programs"

Transcription

1 2011 Report of the Provost s Committee on Entrepreneurial Programs Committee on Entrepreneurial Programs University of Connecticut 1/25/2011

2 University of Connecticut Report of the Provost s Committee on Entrepreneurial Programs Introduction January 25, 2011 As a complement to its core academic and research missions, the University of Connecticut recognizes the additional value of the entrepreneurial activities of its schools and colleges as a source of both innovation and financial diversification. Specifically, UConn is interested in encouraging targeted academic programs funded by external sources. While such an entrepreneurial approach to program support is appealing in its own right to encourage innovation, it may become increasingly important given the constrained fiscal environment the University currently faces. An entrepreneurial orientation is also consistent with the University s Academic Plan, which articulates a strategy to Pursue new revenue streams while refining existing budget processes to support the goals of the Academic Plan. Likewise, a guiding principle of the University s Costs, Operations & Revenue Efficiencies (CORE) Task Force, which operated from Fall 2008 through Fall 2010 to identify cost savings and revenue-raising opportunities for the University, was to consider the income generating potential of academic programs. The reputation of the University provides an immediate benefit in providing visibility, establishing the credibility and quality of a program offered, as well as a well-developed infrastructure to build on. All departments and programs have the opportunity to access specialized markets where business, governmental entities, or individuals, may be willing to pay for particular educational opportunities due to the UConn brand. From an entrepreneurial perspective, UConn has the potential to access these markets, compete for these students against existing providers, and generate revenues to support their core missions. At the same time, while entrepreneurial programs may generate revenues, they do not do so without cost, as they require resources from the units within the University that house them and from the central administrative offices that support them. In light of these circumstances, Vice Provost Suman Singha convened a committee to review the University's practices regarding fees and revenue generated by entrepreneurial programs in That committee collected data about programs and revenue structures across the University, and produced a draft report in August In August 2010, Provost Peter Nicholls reconstituted the committee and charged it to review and revise the draft findings with a view toward proposing a viable revenue-sharing structure that would permit entrepreneurial programs to thrive, cover the direct and indirect costs of offering these programs, and provide a return to the University. The central goal of the Provost s committee on entrepreneurial programs was to examine current University practice with regard to these programs and to propose a rational, consistent, and transparent approach to their management. This report documents our findings and provides 2

3 recommendations. The report proceeds as follows. First we present the committee s charge and approach. We then describe current practices with regard to entrepreneurial programs, and specifically identify opportunities and challenges associated with such programs. We draw some broader conclusions and make recommendations about how to improve the decision-making processes associated with entrepreneurial programs. Finally, we propose a revenue sharing rate structure to support cost recovery while maintaining the incentives of departments and schools to actively pursue these opportunities. Members The task force included eleven members that have a particular interest in, expertise about, or responsibility for entrepreneurial programs at UConn: Patricia Butler Lofman, Business Manager, Center for Continuing Studies Jeffrey Crouse, Finance Director, Neag School of Education Amy Donahue, Department Head, Department of Public Policy, CLAS Lori-Anne Hansen-Roy, Manager, Office of Cost Analysis Jean Main, Director, Financial Aid Office Susan Nesbitt, Director, Center for Continuing Studies Glen O'Keefe, Bursar, Office of the Controller George Plesko, Associate Dean, School of Business Roxanne Roy, Senior Financial Planner/Advisor, Office of the Chief Financial Officer (Chair) Suman Singha, Senior Vice Provost and Vice President for Research Jeff von Munkwitz-Smith, University Registrar & Director of Summer Programs Charge The Provost asked the Committee to examine practices regarding externally funded entrepreneurial programs. In particular, the committee was to: 1. Review current University practices regarding revenue generated by entrepreneurial programs at the University. 2. Recommend fair and appropriate rates for the return of revenue to the central administration to recover the costs of entrepreneurial programs that are borne centrally and to share the benefits. Methodology Once convened, the Committee met at least weekly to review requested information, deliberate and reach a consensus on an appropriate structure for centralized cost recovery from entrepreneurial programs. The Committee began with a review of the 2008 draft report and the materials that had been gathered to support that analysis. These materials included, but were not limited to, a history of centralized cost recovery employed at UConn to recover costs centrally from programs that raise revenues, information about cost recovery methods employed by peer institutions, the results of a survey of schools and colleges at UConn about the entrepreneurial 3

4 programs they operate, and an inventory of certificate programs at UConn. Based on this input and its own experience and expertise, the committee deliberated at length about the criteria by which a rate for centralized cost recovery should be set. To help determine reasonable and appropriate rates, the committee examined data on existing rates at UConn; data about administrative, facilities-related, library and student services costs at UConn; and insights about the burdens borne by central administrative offices to support entrepreneurial programs. Findings This section first describes University funding mechanisms in general. It then articulates findings relevant to the design, development, and implementation of entrepreneurial programs, and offers specific recommendations. The next section offers a rationale for structuring centralized cost recovery and proposes a rubric. Overview of University funding structures 1 Revenues related to instructional activities are generated from a variety of sources including graduate and undergraduate tuition, a variety of fees, grants, and contracts. Tuition revenue as accrued by program, degree, unit or college is recorded centrally. Tuition rates are set centrally by senior University management and must be approved by the Board of Trustees and the Board of Governors for Higher Education by law (General Statutes of Connecticut Title 10a Chapter 185 Sec. 10a-15). Budget allocations from tuition revenues (and other sources, such as state support) to the schools and colleges are made at the discretion of the President based on budget negotiations with the Provost and Deans. The bulk of each school or college s funding is ultimately allocated to its tuition account. These allocations are not tied in any formulaic manner to enrollments in that school or college s courses or to the tuition revenue generated by that school or college. In rare cases, a portion of the tuition paid to the University is returned to the unit offering the program in which they are enrolled such as for the Professional Science Master s degree. For this degree program tuition returns are not transferred automatically through an accounting mechanism that identifies and distributes funds. Instead, the returns are calculated postenrollment querying the PeopleSoft system and a transfer to the unit is subsequently made. In some cases where a new graduate academic program has been able to charge its students differential tuition rates, increased budget allocations have been provided to the school or college. The increased funding was directly related to the additional tuition revenue generated and it was needed to fund the extra delivery costs. Two such programs are PharmD and the Doctorate in Physical Therapy. Similarly, the School of Education was provided an increased budget allocation when it launched the Teachers Certificate Program for College Graduates (TCPCG). Although TCPCG is not charging its students a differential graduate tuition rate it is a year-long four-semester (summer I, summer II, fall, spring) Master s Degree program charging 1 Here a brief synopsis is presented, for a more detailed discussion; see University of Connecticut College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Report of the Dean s Task Force on Revenue Generation. November 28,

5 students tuition. Additional budget allocations have been provided as these programs have grown or expanded to other campuses. With the exception of certain programs (such as BGS, MPS, MEng, PMBA, EMBA, L.LM etc.), most matriculated students pay tuition. In addition, students who are not matriculated into a degree program generally pay course fees through the Center for Continuing Studies (CCS), though there are exceptions such as non-degree MBA and MEng. In some cases fees collected by CCS are returned to the programs entirely, sometimes they are shared between the programs and CCS, and sometimes CCS retains them. Fee rates for summer, intersession, BGS, MPS and non-degree courses through CCS follow the Board approved tuition rates. Fee rates for some credit bearing self-supporting programs such as MEng, PMBA, EMBA, L.LM are set by the units that charge them in consultation with senior management, and must be approved by the Board of Trustees, and the DHE. Currently a surcharge or administrative tax is collected centrally on most fee based programs. The precise amount and arrangement of these surcharges varies considerably by program based on a number of historical factors. Approval procedures The Provost s Office outlines the steps in the process for approval of academic programs, 2 though many units may not be aware of the process. Likewise, the process for obtaining approval for tuition and fees is delineated, though again, many units may not be informed about this procedure. The process for obtaining approval for fees also takes a long time, which inhibits the ability of the University to take advantage of opportunities to respond to market demands by expeditiously offering entrepreneurial programs. Central revenue recovery arrangements are currently ad hoc, and do not arise from a standard set of rules and procedures. New programs can gain access to these alternate funding models as they have traditionally been negotiated at the time the programs are approved. It may also be possible for an existing program to obtain approval to shift away from general fund allocations to an alternative funding model by special arrangement. There are several existing programs that are not currently, but could be, funded under alternative arrangements. The process for gaining approval for a new program to be structured as an entrepreneurial program, or for an established program to recover fees or tuition, is not delineated or documented. Our first set of recommendations is driven by the Committee s concern that this lack of standardization can inhibit the development of new programs: Recommendation #1: The revenue recovery arrangements from entrepreneurial programs to central administration should be transparent, standardized, and consistent. 2 See 5

6 Recommendation #2: The process for establishing the revenue structure for new programs should be delineated in University policy. Recommendation #3: User-friendly flow-charts that guide units through the process of program approval, fee structure approval, and fee implementation should be developed and disseminated. Recommendation #4: Flexibility from the Board of Trustees to set appropriate fees for new entrepreneurial programs within specified bounds consistent with existing fees should be requested. Advantages to entrepreneurship Entrepreneurial programs are activities that, through their innovative approach or content and by virtue of the special market of students they reach, are able to independently generate revenues. Some entrepreneurial programs are pure in that they cover all of their costs and are therefore fully self-sustaining and may generate a profit. Many, however, can be considered hybrid programs in that they depend on University resources (such as faculty or facilities) for which they do not fully pay, but they also bring in revenues that the University may not otherwise realize. In these cases, entrepreneurial structures create additional financial support to existing academic operations. Beyond the financial advantages both pure and hybrid entrepreneurial programs realize for the school or college, these programs can benefit the University by sharing profits centrally. Programs can also create additional benefits by providing funding to build staff, laboratory, technological, or clinical capacity that benefits the University beyond simple delivery of the program. Additionally, entrepreneurial programs offer advantages such as revenue returns that can improve the quality of academic programs by allowing departments to hire adjunct instructors in unique fields, offer a greater variety of courses, or expand specialized offerings. Entrepreneurial activities may also allow departments, schools, and colleges to more fully employ existing resources. For example, these programs often take advantage of open seats, enrolling students in valuable specialized courses that might not otherwise be offered because enrollments would be too low. All of these advantages increase the value of the UConn brand. At the same time, entrepreneurial programs benefit from the existing value of the UConn brand, which has developed from the State's investment in the University s physical plant and its various programs, as well as the University s research and academic reputation, and thus profit-sharing with the wider University is warranted. In addition, the increased autonomy and flexibility created by entrepreneurial programs are valued in their own right. Flexibility allows programs to innovate, develop depth in areas of specialty, and respond quickly to changing market demands, all of which engage the interests of faculty and students alike. 6

7 Finally, entrepreneurial structures can improve accountability. A truly self-supporting program receives only revenues that it raises and purchases only what they can afford based on enrollment. This requires sound management on the part of the unit. Greater transparency regarding how successful programs generate revenue supports decision-making about which programs to cut and which to keep by providing clear signals about the value of and demand for programs. It is important to note that there are many revenue-generating activities at the University that are not considered in this discussion and analysis (e.g., ice cream sales, flower sales, clinics, study abroad). The scope of this Committee's analysis applies only to entrepreneurial instructional programs for credit. These other activities also generate revenues and the University could benefit from extending a standard structure to them as well. Recommendation #5: A review of revenue-generating activities at the University other than instructional programs for credit should be conducted. Challenges of entrepreneurial programs Entrepreneurial structures offer several advantages, but also create challenges for the institution. Most importantly, offering an entrepreneurial program is not costless, and may involve costs that are not known or considered by the program designer. Programs have both start-up and ongoing costs, both direct and indirect costs, and both monetary and nonmonetary costs. Some of these costs are borne by the units that offer these programs, while others are distributed across the University more broadly. For most administrative and facilities functions the marginal cost associated with each additional student in these programs is very small for example, the additional demand for things like grounds maintenance, security, or custodial support brought on by an entrepreneurial program is almost imperceptible. The additional costs associated with some functions, such as operation of the COGEN power plant, are arguably zero. On the other hand, a few offices bear a noticeable (if not precisely measurable) burden as a result of entrepreneurial programs. Most notably, staff in the bursar s office, registrar s office, financial aid office, and University finance office spend considerable effort setting up and administering systems tailored to the special needs of each entrepreneurial program. Entrepreneurial programs rely on the specialized expertise of the staff in these offices to guide them through University procedures and assure their students are managed and serviced properly. While published, standardized procedures can alleviate some of this burden, entrepreneurial programs will nonetheless require specialized support. Sometimes the advantages of entrepreneurial programs cannot be realized. While specialized programs may seem innately valuable or interesting, they may not be able to reach a market of students to support them. In addition, programs may not be able to take advantage of slack resources. Excess instructional capacity may not exist classes are full, and adding more students would degrade the quality of existing programs. In addition, departments may be driven toward offering only large, high-enrolling programs in order to cover their costs. This makes smaller programs harder to offer, even where they are educationally valuable. In addition, programs are 7

8 incentivized to accept any student who is willing to pay, rather than only top students, which may erode the quality of programs. In effect, programs may succumb to financial pressures instead of upholding high academic standards. Naive or narrow reactions to such pressure may threaten the value of the UConn brand by undermining its core educational mission. Under these circumstances, it may not be worthwhile to offer an entrepreneurial program. The University should have mechanisms for assessing the benefits and costs of entrepreneurial programs both before they are approved and over their life. Recommendation #6: Wherever possible, grant funds should be identified to defray start-up expenses. Departments seeking to develop new programs should explore these opportunities. Recommendation #7: In cases where external start-up funds are not available, the program must quantify these requirements, and the Dean of the school or college or Provost s Office must explicitly commit to supporting them. Recommendation #8: Proposals for all entrepreneurial programs should include a fully-developed business case that identifies the monetary and non-monetary costs and benefits of the program, specifies the stream of costs and revenues that will be associated with the program over time, identifies the point at which the program will break even, and articulates the process by which the program will be evaluated. Recommendation #9: Proposals for all entrepreneurial programs should be accompanied by a market study that demonstrates adequate demand for the proposed program. Recommendation #10: From a financial standpoint, all entrepreneurial programs should be tracked and regularly reviewed to determine whether they are meeting their revenue goals, to implement corrective action if they are not, and to close them if they cannot sustain themselves adequately. Recommendation #11: From an academic standpoint they should also be evaluated periodically to ensure that they are not competing with other programs. Recommendation #12: Entrepreneurial programs should return funds to central administration to recover the costs they impose. The rates at which programs return funds should be standardized and based on a transparent rationale. Recommended Recovery Structure The Committee developed its rationale for centralized cost recoveries based on an explicit set of guiding principles and information about current costs and practices. These are derived from the findings and recommendations articulated above. Guiding principles All programs and departments enjoy an explicit benefit from their association with the University. The financial investment of the State, coupled with the substantial investment of talent and time 8

9 of the faculty and other personnel in every part of the University, have created an institutional reputation that benefits everyone associated with UConn. The value of an entrepreneurial program is enhanced by association with the University. All entrepreneurial programs offered at the University cost something to operate. Central cost recovery from entrepreneurial programs that otherwise retain the revenue they generate is warranted to cover the costs imposed on central administrative offices. The rate structure for the centralized cost recovery should be based on the costs, direct and indirect, that entrepreneurial programs impose. Entrepreneurial programs are an endeavor that the University values, encourages, and supports. The University at large should benefit from entrepreneurial activities. Entrepreneurial programs are inherently more risky to manage than tuition-funded programs. To improve predictability, the centralized cost recovery rates that entrepreneurial programs pay should be transparent, set as part of the approval process for the program, and remain stable over time. Rates should be standard across like programs rather than idiosyncratic circumstances and special arrangements. Though in rare cases exceptions may be warranted, the rationale for any exception should be clear, compelling, well-documented, and transparent. The centralized cost recovery returned to central administration should account for variation in an entrepreneurial program s level of activity in other words, the transfer should be lower when the program brings in less money and higher when the program brings in more money. For entrepreneurial programs, the costs imposed on central administrative offices are primarily driven by enrollments, just as revenues are. This suggests that the centralized cost recovery should be tied to a program s revenue, rather than its costs. Such an approach also places the greatest responsibility for managing the financial aspects of a program to the unit offering it, since cost savings will directly benefit the unit. Approach To determine a reasonable and appropriate centralized cost recovery structure, the Committee considered three perspectives: 1. The Committee looked at rates currently being charged for revenue return to central administration. These vary considerably across programs as a result of the various purposes for which they were assessed and rates were set in the past. In general, at the unit level, rates vary from a low of 3.5% to a high of 13%. 2. The Committee looked at costs for facilities and administration that may be allocable to programs depending on where and how they are offered. Specifically, we considered whether programs were offered on-campus (i.e. on the main or regional campuses) or off-campus (i.e. on-line, at some location other than the main or regional campuses, or by CCS), and whether they were offered to degree, non-degree, and not-for-credit students. These data are not configured to provide a clear view of the costs actually associated with entrepreneurial programs, but they did 9

10 offer a worst case perspective on overhead burdens. At most, entrepreneurial programs would be expected to cover the full complement of administrative and facilities costs associated with these programs. 3. The Committee discussed non-monetary costs associated with entrepreneurial programs, especially demands on staff in the bursar s, registrar s, financial aid, and University finance offices who devote substantial attention to the special needs of each entrepreneurial program. At a minimum, entrepreneurial programs should be expected to offset the staff costs in these central offices associated with these programs. 3 Structure The Committee proposes that the University maintain a charge based on gross revenues to recover the indirect costs the program imposes on the University's resources, as well as to recognize the implicit benefits of the University affiliation. Recognizing that on-campus programs consume more University resources than off-campus programs, and that off-campus programs are directly responsible for additional program costs, the Committee further proposes a twotiered rate structure to account for variations in the costs and burdens imposed by the program depending on where the program is offered. 4 To determine an appropriate rate structure, the Committee examined current revenue and recovery levels. For FY11, we find that the total for-credit course fee revenue budgeted at the University is approximately $39,330,000. Under current arrangements, rates charged vary from 3.5% to 13%, and the average rate charged across all programs is 7.05%. These charges are budgeted to return $2,770,900 centrally. Using FY11 budgeted figures, we then estimated the amount of the assessment under various alternatives involving mixed off-campus/on-campus rates. As shown in the table below, a mixed rate of 6%/9% would yield slightly more revenue recovered (about $2.87 million, a gain of $96,209 over current levels), while a mixed rate of and a rate of 12%/15% would almost double returns over the current system (about $5.23 million, a gain of about $2.5 million). 5 Based on these figures, the committee proposes a universal mixed rate structure whereby off-campus entrepreneurial programs are charged 9% of their gross revenues, and on-campus entrepreneurial programs are charged 12% of their gross revenues. 3 Appendix A provides a list of the various types of activities within the University that are potentially affected by entrepreneurial programs. While the Committee analyzed the costs of each, both in total and how they change with enrollment, it was eventually decided that such a disaggregated analysis to identify and assign costs for each function would not be practical. 4 The Committee also reviewed the rate structures at other universities. While it is difficult to directly compare rates without a full understanding of each institution's cost structure, knowing the range of rates is important since programs being developed at UConn may compete against programs at these other institutions. Appendix B provides a summary of this survey. 5 Quantifying the differential costs imposed by on-campus versus off-campus programs is very difficult, and may vary by the type of program. The exact amount of the rate differential between on and off-campus programs is at some level arbitrary, however the Committee did examine the types of services outlined in Appendix C to reach the conclusion that two rates are justified since off-campus programs need to directly cover the cost of certain expenses that are otherwise shared on a UConn campus. The Committee also concluded that the benefit of the UConn affiliation is itself substantial, and that any differential should be less than 5 percent. 10

11 This proposed rate structure has three advantages over the current system. First, as a universal, standardized structure based solely on revenues, it is much simpler, more transparent, and more equitable than the complex array of historical arrangements. Second, such a streamlined structure is easier to administer, and leaves the ultimate financial success of entrepreneurial activities in the hands of the program administrators who have an incentive to operate their programs as efficiently as possible. Third, the proposed rate structure lowers the maximum rate that any programs would pay, but increases the overall revenue returned to the provost to both offset the indirect costs of entrepreneurial programs and to support other University activities. Revenue recovered centrally under alternative mixed rate structures. Off-campus rate On-campus rate 6% 9% 12% 9% $ 2,867,109 [$96,209] N/A N/A 12% $ 3,374,418 [$603,518] $ 4,047,009 [$1,276,109] N/A 15% $ 3,881,727 [$1,110,827] $ 4,554,318 [$1,783,418] $ 5,226,909 [$2,456,009] The table presents revenue recovered centrally under alternative on-campus/off-campus mixed rate structures. The gain in revenue recovered centrally over current practice for each alternative is shown in brackets. Rates where on-campus rate is the same as or less than the off-campus rate are noted as not applicable, since these do not recognize the fact that on-campus programs impose a greater burden than off-campus programs do. The Committee s recommended structure is in bold. Recommendation #13: The University should adopt and implement a structure where off-campus entrepreneurial programs are charged 9% of their gross revenues and on-campus entrepreneurial programs are charged 12% of their gross revenues. Upon implementation, the new rate structure should apply universally and supersede all existing tax and payment arrangements. It is important to note that the estimated assessment amounts presented here overstate the amount of revenue that would be generated. In particular, the summer session shares revenues with both the schools/departments offering courses as well as with the regional campuses and the Provost. An increase in the centralized cost recovery will reduce the amount of revenue 11

12 available for sharing with schools, departments, regional campuses, and the Provost. Our estimates do not consider this offset. As we have explained, the purpose of the centralized cost recovery from entrepreneurial programs is to defray the costs these programs impose on central administrative offices. While the Committee discussed possible approaches to direct funds to affected administrative offices, it was ultimately agreed that such decisions need to be determined at the Provost's level as part of a broader allocation of resources. However, in order for these administrative offices to be compensated for their resource demands, especially when staffing is tight, an allocation arrangement and procedure should be defined. Recommendation #14: Specify the arrangement and process by which revenues returned centrally will be allocated to the offices that support entrepreneurial programs. Transition The Committee believes that the new centralized cost recovery structure should apply to all relevant programs at the University. Furthermore, no program should be grandfathered. In other words, all programs must ultimately transition to the new structure. That said, it is important to proceed in a deliberate manner to the new structure to minimize disruption to programs that will see an appreciable increase in the charges they face. The Committee recommends that the new centralized cost recovery be implemented over the course of a year. After three years, this structure should be reassessed to assure that it returns adequate funds to cover costs incurred centrally, while allowing programs to retain sufficient funds to succeed as entrepreneurial programs. Summer Programs and the Center for Continuing Studies currently do significant revenue sharing with the Provost and the academic units. Imposition of a higher rate will decrease the annual return to the Provost and to the academic units delivering the courses. There is a real danger that this will discourage the academic units from offering courses during the summer and intersession and entrepreneurial programs through the Center for Continuing Studies. Summer Programs and the Center for Continuing Studies should be encouraged to adjust their current revenue sharing formulas to hold the academic units harmless from the effects of the higher rate. Other Issues The Committee discussed a number of issues which complicate the implementation of any new system of charges as well as other design options. At this point, we do not feel there is sufficient information to determine whether, and how, to incorporate these into the proposed structure. Indeed, it may only be through the initial implementation of a new structure that information becomes available to determine their likely importance. Nonetheless, we note a few of the issues here for future consideration. Additional surcharge. The Committee discussed the possibility of a third rate, or surcharge, to be levied on highly successful programs, but does not recommend such at this time. The difficulty in 12

13 doing so is two-fold: defining "highly successful" programs, which might be based on revenue in excess of a certain level (with the surcharge applying only to revenues in excess of that amount), and determining the appropriate surcharge rate. We recommend that this issue be examined when the rate structure is reviewed. Tuition Waivers. Not all participants in external programs generate revenues to that program, even though they impose costs. Full-time students or graduate students on assistantships may wish to take classes offered in other units but would not be charged tuition to do so. In these cases, the revenue of the paying students is assessed the centralized cost, but no consideration is made for the costs of students who are not required to pay. At the same time, there is an important benefit to making these programs available to full-time students and graduate assistants, and they should not be excluded from these programs simply because they do not generate additional revenue. This issue is beyond the scope of the Committee, but should be examined. CONCLUSION The University values entrepreneurial programs because they encourage innovation and provide opportunities to earn additional revenue. Entrepreneurial programs are a logical arrangement for central programs at the University that have the potential to tap markets of students willing to pay for a program specially configured to meet their needs. These programs are valuable supplements to units that also receive general tuition support and have the potential to expand specialized offerings without placing additional financial burdens on departments by utilizing slack resources. At the same time, entrepreneurial programs are unlikely to ever produce sufficient revenues to be a large part of the budget solution for the University. In addition, not all programs can be profitable or even break even; there may be programs which provide important benefits to the community, or address a strategic need, that cannot cover their costs, but should nonetheless be operated. In such cases it is critical to consider the variables that affect each program s operations and outcomes when determining whether an entrepreneurial funding model is appropriate. In sum, for the University to facilitate the development and success of new programs, the University must provide appropriate guidance along with the administrative and facilities functions necessary to support them, and the oversight to validate their success. 13

14 REFERENCES Connecticut Academic Plan University of Connecticut, Draft Report of the Committee on External/Entrepreneurial Programs. August 21, University of Connecticut College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Report of the Dean s Task Force on Revenue Generation. November 28,

November 23, 2009 Page 2 of 7

November 23, 2009 Page 2 of 7 A Proposal to Enhance Graduate Education and Research through Restructuring of Graduate Education at Saint Louis University By Manoj S. Patankar, Ph.D., Interim Provost Introduction This document presents

More information

PROFESSIONAL MASTERS

PROFESSIONAL MASTERS PROFESSIONAL MASTERS PROGRAM GUIDELINES West Lafayette Campus August 2012 Definition of Professional Masters Program The characteristics of a Professional Masters program at Purdue as outlined below provide

More information

DISTANCE EDUCATION STANDARDS AND GUIDELINES

DISTANCE EDUCATION STANDARDS AND GUIDELINES DISTANCE EDUCATION STANDARDS AND GUIDELINES Distance Education in a National Context Distance education is becoming a standard practice in higher education. 1 According to a report issued by the National

More information

Strategic Plan. Revised, April 2015

Strategic Plan. Revised, April 2015 Strategic Plan 2011 2020 Revised, April 2015 A Message from the President I am pleased to present Endicott College: Strategic Plan 2011 2020, which was developed by the Endicott College Planning Committee

More information

The Opportunity Cost of Study Abroad Programs: An Economics-Based Analysis

The Opportunity Cost of Study Abroad Programs: An Economics-Based Analysis Frontiers: The Interdisciplinary Journal of Study Abroad The Opportunity Cost of Study Abroad Programs: An Economics-Based Analysis George Heitmann Muhlenberg College I. Introduction Most colleges and

More information

Extended Education at Evergreen: A Financial Analysis

Extended Education at Evergreen: A Financial Analysis Extended Education at Evergreen: A Financial Analysis The purpose of this document is to present an analysis of potential revenues and costs associated with a possible extended education program. The words

More information

Each year, millions of Californians pursue degrees and certificates or enroll in courses

Each year, millions of Californians pursue degrees and certificates or enroll in courses Higher Education Each year, millions of Californians pursue degrees and certificates or enroll in courses to improve their knowledge and skills at the state s higher education institutions. More are connected

More information

Office of Academic and Student Services PROGRAMMING FOR THE NON-TRADITIONAL MARKET IN THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SYSTEM

Office of Academic and Student Services PROGRAMMING FOR THE NON-TRADITIONAL MARKET IN THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SYSTEM The University of Wisconsin System Office of Academic and Student Services Academic Information Series 5.4 Rev (ACIS-5.4 Rev) PROGRAMMING FOR THE NON-TRADITIONAL MARKET IN THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SYSTEM

More information

TUFTS UNIVERSITY APRIL 27, 2011 GUIDELINES FOR PROPOSING NEW DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS

TUFTS UNIVERSITY APRIL 27, 2011 GUIDELINES FOR PROPOSING NEW DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS OFFICE OF PROVOST S THE AND OFFICE SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT TUFTS UNIVERSITY APRIL 27, 2011 GUIDELINES FOR PROPOSING NEW DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS These guidelines outline the steps necessary to develop

More information

UConn ecampus Philosophy and Plan: Update for Deans, Department Heads, and Faculty

UConn ecampus Philosophy and Plan: Update for Deans, Department Heads, and Faculty UConn ecampus Philosophy and Plan: Update for Deans, Department Heads, and Faculty Recent History of UConn s ecampus Efforts Over the last two years, UConn established the Center for Excellence in Teaching

More information

BUDGET APPROVED ON JULY 17, 2014 PROPOSED BUDGET

BUDGET APPROVED ON JULY 17, 2014 PROPOSED BUDGET BUDGET APPROVED ON JULY 17, 2014 PROPOSED BUDGET FY2015 PROPOSED BUDGET FISCAL YEAR 2014-15 Budget Methodology: Temple University is implementing a decentralized budget model in fiscal year 2014-15. This

More information

The Entrepreneurial University: Making University Budgeting More Adaptable, Efficient, and Flexible in Tight Budget Times

The Entrepreneurial University: Making University Budgeting More Adaptable, Efficient, and Flexible in Tight Budget Times The Entrepreneurial University: Making University Budgeting More Adaptable, Efficient, and Flexible in Tight Budget Times Neil D. Theobald Vice President & Chief Financial Officer Professor of Education

More information

College of Nursing Budget System Survey

College of Nursing Budget System Survey College of Nursing Budget System Survey 1. From the perspective of your college, do you feel that the guiding principles of the University budget system have been observed? Explain reasons why or why not?

More information

Financial Report to the Board of Trustees

Financial Report to the Board of Trustees Financial Report to the Board of Trustees February 27, 2013 FY12 Closeout and FY13 Six Month Update Financial Report to the Board of Trustees February 27 2013 Table of Contents Page(s) University of Connecticut

More information

Deploying Professionally Qualified Faculty: An Interpretation of AACSB Standards An AACSB White Paper issued by:

Deploying Professionally Qualified Faculty: An Interpretation of AACSB Standards An AACSB White Paper issued by: Deploying Professionally Qualified Faculty: An Interpretation of AACSB Standards An AACSB White Paper issued by: AACSB Accreditation Coordinating Committee AACSB Accreditation Quality Committee January

More information

TO MEMBERS OF THE COMMITTEE ON EDUCATIONAL POLICY: DISCUSSION ITEM FUNDING UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA GRADUATE ACADEMIC STUDENTS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

TO MEMBERS OF THE COMMITTEE ON EDUCATIONAL POLICY: DISCUSSION ITEM FUNDING UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA GRADUATE ACADEMIC STUDENTS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY E2 Office of the President TO MEMBERS OF THE COMMITTEE ON EDUCATIONAL POLICY: For Meeting of DISCUSSION ITEM FUNDING UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA GRADUATE ACADEMIC STUDENTS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY There has been

More information

Development and Administration of Self- Supporting Degree Programs at Public Institutions

Development and Administration of Self- Supporting Degree Programs at Public Institutions UNIVERSITY BUSINESS EXECUTIVE ROUNDTABLE Development and Administration of Self- Supporting Degree Programs at Public Institutions Custom Research Brief TABLE OF CONTENTS RESEARCH ASSOCIATE Joe LeMaster

More information

WORKING PAPER, V2 Revised December 2011

WORKING PAPER, V2 Revised December 2011 WORKING PAPER, V2 Revised December 2011 Incentive-Based Budget Model Undergraduate Tuition Allocation *New or revised material is indicated by an asterisk. The following information is intended to provide

More information

University of Guelph Bioinformatics program review

University of Guelph Bioinformatics program review University of Guelph Bioinformatics program review Review Panel: Professor Bruce German, University of California, Davis Professor Ejaz Ahmed, Brock University, Ontario Overview The panel has been engaged

More information

TUITION/PRICING FOR ONLINE LEARNING

TUITION/PRICING FOR ONLINE LEARNING TUITION/PRICING FOR ONLINE LEARNING Karen Paulson National Center for Higher Education Management Systems ABSTRACT To make online learning an integral part of higher education, institutions must determine

More information

Program Modification/Proposal Create Quality Systems Undergraduate Certificate (QSUC)

Program Modification/Proposal Create Quality Systems Undergraduate Certificate (QSUC) A. THE MODIFICATION Program Modification/Proposal Create Quality Systems Undergraduate Certificate (QSUC) 1. Describe briefly what the change will be The proposed change provides the existing Quality Systems

More information

Tuition Discounting: Institutional Aid Patterns at Public and Private Colleges and Universities

Tuition Discounting: Institutional Aid Patterns at Public and Private Colleges and Universities Tuition Discounting: Institutional Aid Patterns at Public and Private Colleges and Universities By Sandy Baum & Jennifer Ma 1 Recent data from the College Board s Annual Survey of Colleges reveal significant

More information

UNIVERSITY OF ROCHESTER William E. Simon Graduate School of Business Administration. Proposal for a Clinical Faculty Track

UNIVERSITY OF ROCHESTER William E. Simon Graduate School of Business Administration. Proposal for a Clinical Faculty Track Contents: UNIVERSITY OF ROCHESTER William E. Simon Graduate School of Business Administration Proposal for a Clinical Faculty Track 1. Rationale and Objectives of the Proposal 2. The Simon School Mission

More information

Provost Town Hall October 20, 2015

Provost Town Hall October 20, 2015 Provost Town Hall October 20, 2015 Facts and Figures 17,458 full-time undergraduate students, including 764 in the AA program; 764 parttime Full-time population is 39% Delaware residents and 61% nonresidents

More information

OHIO University OHIO Guarantee Testimony Ohio Senate Finance Higher Education Subcommittee May 19, 2015

OHIO University OHIO Guarantee Testimony Ohio Senate Finance Higher Education Subcommittee May 19, 2015 OHIO University OHIO Guarantee Testimony Ohio Senate Finance Higher Education Subcommittee Introduction: Rethinking Ohio University; I would like to begin my testimony this morning by thanking the legislature

More information

GOING GLOBAL: HOW TO DEVELOP YOUR CONTINUING ENGINEERING EDUCATION STRATEGY FOR A WORLD WITHOUT BORDERS

GOING GLOBAL: HOW TO DEVELOP YOUR CONTINUING ENGINEERING EDUCATION STRATEGY FOR A WORLD WITHOUT BORDERS GOING GLOBAL: HOW TO DEVELOP YOUR CONTINUING ENGINEERING EDUCATION STRATEGY FOR A WORLD WITHOUT BORDERS Andy DiPaolo Senior Associate Dean, Stanford University School of Engineering Stanford, California

More information

University of Connecticut (Storrs & Regionals)

University of Connecticut (Storrs & Regionals) University of Connecticut (Storrs & Regionals) Summary of Recommended Institutional Fees Fiscal Years 2013-2014 Institutional fees require central administrative review and approval. The budgets for the

More information

Establishing a Compensation Model in an Academic Pathology Department

Establishing a Compensation Model in an Academic Pathology Department Establishing a Compensation Model in an Academic Pathology Department William M. Hynes, MHSA, and Donna H. MacMillan, MT(ASCP), MBA Key Words: Academic pathology practice; Compensation; Salary model DOI:10.1309/WDYTWNWY31ACQE0X

More information

Faculty Workload Policies at Public Universities

Faculty Workload Policies at Public Universities ACADEMIC AFFAIRS FORUM Faculty Workload Policies at Public Universities Custom Research Brief Research Associate Ashley Greenberg Associate Research Director Sarah Moore February 2013 2 of 12 3 of 12 Table

More information

Program Modification/Proposal Create Nutrition and Quality Systems Concentration, Masters in Family and Consumer Sciences

Program Modification/Proposal Create Nutrition and Quality Systems Concentration, Masters in Family and Consumer Sciences Program Modification/Proposal Create Nutrition and Quality Systems Concentration, Masters in amily and Consumer Sciences A. THE MODIICATION 1. Describe briefly what the change will be The proposed change

More information

The University of Georgia. Vice President for Finance and Administration. Strategic Plan 2011-2021

The University of Georgia. Vice President for Finance and Administration. Strategic Plan 2011-2021 The University of Georgia Vice President for Finance and Administration Strategic Plan 2011-2021 Revised August 2014 Introduction STRATEGIC PLAN, 2011-2021 Vice President for Finance and Administration

More information

Dean: James Jiambalvo

Dean: James Jiambalvo Introduction This form is used to capture information to be discussed in the annual budget meetings with the Provost and each School or College. The questions are aimed at gathering data in regard to strategic

More information

Professional Master s Programs at Notre Dame A report of the ad hoc committee established by Dean Gregory Sterling

Professional Master s Programs at Notre Dame A report of the ad hoc committee established by Dean Gregory Sterling Professional Master s Programs at Notre Dame A report of the ad hoc committee established by Dean Gregory Sterling Don Howard (Humanities), Ed Maginn (Engineering and Chair), Dave Severson (Science) and

More information

How Does FIU Spend Its Money? FIU Expenditures on Faculty and Higher Level Administration in the Period from 2002-03 to 2008-09

How Does FIU Spend Its Money? FIU Expenditures on Faculty and Higher Level Administration in the Period from 2002-03 to 2008-09 How Does FIU Spend Its Money? FIU Expenditures on Faculty and Higher Level Administration in the Period from 2002-03 to 2008-09 Bruce Nissen and Yue Zhang Research Institute on Social and Economic Policy

More information

WORKING PAPER, V3 Revised January 2012

WORKING PAPER, V3 Revised January 2012 WORKING PAPER, V3 Revised January 2012 Incentive-Based Budget Model Undergraduate Tuition Allocation *New or revised material is indicated by an asterisk. The following information is intended to provide

More information

9. The ad hoc joint committee drafts a formal program implementation proposal. (See Attachment B for a description of the contents of this document.

9. The ad hoc joint committee drafts a formal program implementation proposal. (See Attachment B for a description of the contents of this document. GENERAL PROCEDURES FOR DEVELOPING JOINT DOCTORAL PROGRAMS WITH INDEPENDENT INSTITUTIONS These procedures are based on documents developed by the CSU and California Postsecondary Education Commission (CPEC)

More information

Chapter Three: Challenges and Opportunities

Chapter Three: Challenges and Opportunities Chapter Three: Challenges and Opportunities The preparation of Orange County Community College s Periodic Review Report occurs at a time when the College and New York State are experiencing an economic

More information

Office of the Chancellor Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education Procedures and Standards for University Operations

Office of the Chancellor Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education Procedures and Standards for University Operations Office of the Chancellor Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education Procedures and Standards for University Operations Procedure/Standard Number 2011-02 Tuition and Mandatory Fees Approved by: Date:

More information

VIII. RESPONSIBILITIES AND FUNCTIONS OF COLLEGE ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS

VIII. RESPONSIBILITIES AND FUNCTIONS OF COLLEGE ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS VIII. RESPONSIBILITIES AND FUNCTIONS OF COLLEGE ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS The President s Cabinet and the Executive Committee are two of the administrative bodies charged with leading and coordinating the

More information

University of Nebraska Online Worldwide Rolling Three Year Strategic Plan January 2010

University of Nebraska Online Worldwide Rolling Three Year Strategic Plan January 2010 University of Nebraska Online Worldwide Rolling Three Year Strategic Plan January 2010 The University of Nebraska has established an integrated University wide distance education program to serve the educational

More information

Budget Model Redesign Initiative Stakeholder Discussions

Budget Model Redesign Initiative Stakeholder Discussions Budget Model Redesign Initiative Stakeholder Discussions February 18, 2014 University of Memphis Budget Redesign Why should the University of Memphis Explore a budget model redesign? Financial Challenges

More information

APR comments on any/all of the six specific components of the self-study (if applicable)

APR comments on any/all of the six specific components of the self-study (if applicable) Academic Program Review SUMMARY* Department under review:_master of Business Administration Date self-study received in Dean s office: Aug. 28, 2013 Date of external consultant s review: April 24, 2013

More information

Creating Quality Developmental Education

Creating Quality Developmental Education ***Draft*** Creating Quality Developmental Education A Guide to the Top Ten Actions Community College Administrators Can Take to Improve Developmental Education Submitted to House Appropriations Subcommittee

More information

UCDNN BACKGROUND: June 25, 2014 TO: FROM: Members of the Mun Y. Cho. d of Trustees RE:

UCDNN BACKGROUND: June 25, 2014 TO: FROM: Members of the Mun Y. Cho. d of Trustees RE: UCDNN UNIVERSITYOF CONNECTICUT Office of the Provost Mun Y. Choi, Ph.D. Provost & Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs June 25, 2014 TO: FROM: Members of the Mun Y. Cho 'OSlO d of Trustees RE:

More information

Community-Based Program Review at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI) Trudy W. Banta

Community-Based Program Review at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI) Trudy W. Banta Community-Based Program Review at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI) Trudy W. Banta Defining Approaches Program review is defined quite differently on different campuses. It may

More information

Terry College of Business Strategic Plan

Terry College of Business Strategic Plan Terry College of Business Strategic Plan The mission of the University of Georgia s Terry College of Business is the pursuit and dissemination of knowledge for the effective and ethical practice of business.

More information

Certificates guidelines are found at: http://www.gradschool.unh.edu/pdf/pol_certificate.pdf

Certificates guidelines are found at: http://www.gradschool.unh.edu/pdf/pol_certificate.pdf GUIDELINES FOR THE APPROVAL OF NEW, MODIFIED, OR DELETED GRADUATE PROGRAMS (DEGREES, MAJORS AND OPTIONS) THE UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE Approved by the Graduate Council, 3/8/00; rev 12/11*, rev. 8/12**

More information

POLICY ON SELF-SUPPORTING GRADUATE DEGREE PROGRAMS

POLICY ON SELF-SUPPORTING GRADUATE DEGREE PROGRAMS University of California POLICY ON SELF-SUPPORTING GRADUATE DEGREE PROGRAMS Self-supporting programs allow the University to serve additional students above and beyond the resources provided by the state

More information

Statement for the Record. American Bankers Association. Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs. United States Senate

Statement for the Record. American Bankers Association. Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs. United States Senate Statement for the Record On behalf of the American Bankers Association before the Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs of the United States Senate Statement for the Record On behalf of the

More information

FAQs Cal State Online

FAQs Cal State Online FAQs Cal State Online 1. What is Cal State Online? Cal State Online is a coordinated systemwide collection of services that not only supports the delivery of online programs from systemwide campuses but

More information

5. SALARY POLICIES 5.1. SALARY POLICY AND GOALS 5.2. SALARY PROCEDURES 5.3. ROLE OF THE COLLEGE PERSONNEL COMMITTEE IN COMPENSATION

5. SALARY POLICIES 5.1. SALARY POLICY AND GOALS 5.2. SALARY PROCEDURES 5.3. ROLE OF THE COLLEGE PERSONNEL COMMITTEE IN COMPENSATION Original language with revisions 5. SALARY POLICIES 5.1. SALARY POLICY AND GOALS While Missouri State University does not have a formal salary schedule for faculty and other academic employees, it is the

More information

MINNESOTA STATE COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES BOARD OF TRUSTEES Agenda Item Summary Sheet

MINNESOTA STATE COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES BOARD OF TRUSTEES Agenda Item Summary Sheet MINNESOTA STATE COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES BOARD OF TRUSTEES Agenda Item Summary Sheet Name: Finance and Facilities Committee Date: June 17, 2015 Title: FY2016 Operating Budget (Second Reading) Purpose

More information

Charting the Future Bachelor of Applied Science in Public Service. I. The Past: Reflecting on our Heritage

Charting the Future Bachelor of Applied Science in Public Service. I. The Past: Reflecting on our Heritage Charting the Future Bachelor of Applied Science in Public Service I. The Past: Reflecting on our Heritage A. History and Development of Program/Services The University of Northern Colorado (UNC), in concert

More information

2 nd EUA Funding Forum: Strategies for efficient funding of universities

2 nd EUA Funding Forum: Strategies for efficient funding of universities 2 nd EUA Funding Forum: Strategies for efficient funding of universities Bergamo, 9-10 October 2014 Forum report Liviu Matei, General rapporteur Table of contents I. Executive Summary 3 II. What is the

More information

GRADUATE PROGRAM REVIEW POLICY. Texas Southern University

GRADUATE PROGRAM REVIEW POLICY. Texas Southern University GRADUATE PROGRAM REVIEW POLICY Texas Southern University The Purposes of Graduate Program Review Graduate program review at Texas Southern University exists to ensure that programs are functioning at the

More information

SIGNIFICANT UNIVERSITY-WIDE IMPLEMENTATION ACTIONS

SIGNIFICANT UNIVERSITY-WIDE IMPLEMENTATION ACTIONS PROGRESS ON THE STRATEGIC PLAN IMPLEMENTATION Presented to the Board of Trustees November 20, 2009 At each September Board of Trustees meeting, a comprehensive report will be presented on the progress

More information

CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES IN ONLINE PUBLIC POLICY PROGRAMS:

CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES IN ONLINE PUBLIC POLICY PROGRAMS: DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC POLICY CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES IN ONLINE PUBLIC POLICY PROGRAMS: A STRATEGIC OVERVIEW PREPARED BY: MICHAEL D. GOODMAN, PH.D. ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR AND CHAIR DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC

More information

MEMORANDUM. Discontinue M.S. Degree Program in Industrial Relations, Iowa State University

MEMORANDUM. Discontinue M.S. Degree Program in Industrial Relations, Iowa State University MEMORANDUM To: From: Subject: Board of Regents Board Office Discontinue M.S. Degree Program in Industrial Relations, Iowa State University Date: June 7, 2004 Recommended Action: Approve Iowa State University

More information

OPERATING BUDGET POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 2013-2014. Table of Contents

OPERATING BUDGET POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 2013-2014. Table of Contents Operating Budget Policies and Procedures FY2014 OPERATING BUDGET POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 2013-2014 Table of Contents INTRODUCTION... 2 STRUCTURE AND PRESENTATION... 2 RESOURCE ALLOCATION... 3 CARRYOVER

More information

Faculty Productivity and Costs at The University of Texas at Austin

Faculty Productivity and Costs at The University of Texas at Austin Faculty Productivity and Costs at The University of Texas at Austin A Preliminary Analysis Richard Vedder Christopher Matgouranis Jonathan Robe Center for College Affordability and Productivity A Policy

More information

A. Notice of Intent (See Appendix A)

A. Notice of Intent (See Appendix A) Academic Planning Committee Proposal Doctorate of Education (Ed. D.) in Student Affairs Administration and Leadership Department of Student Affairs Administration College of Liberal Studies Spring 2014

More information

See how we think and do.

See how we think and do. See how we think and do. The Jenkins MBA Difference Located at the epicenter of North Carolina s booming research and technology sectors, the Jenkins Graduate School of Management offers one of the nation

More information

GRADUATE EDUCATION VISION AND STRATEGY AT TCU

GRADUATE EDUCATION VISION AND STRATEGY AT TCU GRADUATE EDUCATION VISION AND STRATEGY AT TCU A Position Paper Prepared by the Committee on Graduation Education October 2004 1 Members of the Committee: Dr. Lazelle Benefield Harris School of Nursing

More information

Each year, millions of Californians pursue degrees and certificates or enroll in courses

Each year, millions of Californians pursue degrees and certificates or enroll in courses Higher Education Each year, millions of Californians pursue degrees and certificates or enroll in courses to improve their knowledge and skills at the state s higher education institutions. More are connected

More information

Michigan State University Space Assignment Policy

Michigan State University Space Assignment Policy Michigan State University Space Assignment Policy Specifically Addressing Office and Research Space Revised: October 2007 [1] I. Preamble: Policy Statement on the Assignment of Space All Michigan State

More information

QUALITY ASSURANCE HANDBOOK. Policies, procedures and resources to guide undergraduate and graduate program development and improvement at UOIT

QUALITY ASSURANCE HANDBOOK. Policies, procedures and resources to guide undergraduate and graduate program development and improvement at UOIT QUALITY ASSURANCE HANDBOOK Policies, procedures and resources to guide undergraduate and graduate program development and improvement at UOIT UOIT Academic Council June 15, 2010, revised June 9, 2011 QUALITY

More information

GRADUATE SCHOOL AND CONTINUING EDUCATION OFFICE OF THE DEAN

GRADUATE SCHOOL AND CONTINUING EDUCATION OFFICE OF THE DEAN GRADUATE SCHOOL AND CONTINUING EDUCATION OFFICE OF THE DEAN SUMMER SESSION 2015 POLICIES AND PROCEDURES Summer I: Tuesday, May 19, 2015 - Friday, June 26, 2015 Summer II: Monday, June 29, 2015 - Friday,

More information

UF ONLINE ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14. Submitted July 21, 2014 by the Advisory Board for UF Online

UF ONLINE ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14. Submitted July 21, 2014 by the Advisory Board for UF Online UF ONLINE ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14 Submitted July 21, 2014 by the Advisory Board for UF Online 1 Executive Summary Under Florida law, the Advisory Board for the institute for online learning, which was subsequently

More information

If new Undergraduate degree, granting College/School: College of Arts & Sciences

If new Undergraduate degree, granting College/School: College of Arts & Sciences Cover Sheet Entity X New Curriculum New Academic Program New Research Endeavor New Academic Service Endeavor New Academic Center or Institute Bachelor of Arts X Bachelor of Science Master of Arts Master

More information

CENTRAL COLLEGE ABROAD Cooperating Agreement Plan

CENTRAL COLLEGE ABROAD Cooperating Agreement Plan EXTENDING PARTICIPATION IN A PROGRAM We encourage students to study abroad for the full year. Those who are certain about the fall semester and considering a full year should apply for the year. Notification

More information

A Differential Tuition Model for Professional Science Master s Programs

A Differential Tuition Model for Professional Science Master s Programs FINANCIAL MODELS FOR PROGRAM SUSTAINABILITY A Differential Tuition Model for Professional Science Master s Programs Jung H. Choi, Associate Professor, Director, Professional MS Bioinformatics Program,

More information

International Agreements

International Agreements International Agreements Handbook of Procedures & 2011 Guidelines Office of International Affairs Ronan Hall www.oia.cmich.edu Phone: 989-774-4308 Fax: 989-774-3690 Central Michigan University International

More information

DUAL CREDIT PROGRAM ARTICULATION AGREEMENT

DUAL CREDIT PROGRAM ARTICULATION AGREEMENT DUAL CREDIT PROGRAM ARTICULATION AGREEMENT For Dual Credit Between and This Agreement is entered into as of, by and between and. This agreement sets out the terms and conditions of the dual credit program

More information

Planning and Budget Process

Planning and Budget Process Planning and Budget Process The University s planning framework, The Highest Order of Excellence II, is the framework for strategic planning at all levels of the institution. Oversight for the strategic

More information

Review of the Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.) 52.0201

Review of the Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.) 52.0201 Review of the Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.) 52.0201 Overview of the program. The Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.) program within the College of Business is an interdisciplinary graduate

More information

Vision To be the clear business school choice for those who want to engage in real-world learning experiences

Vision To be the clear business school choice for those who want to engage in real-world learning experiences 1. Introduction 2015-2020 College Of Business Strategic Plan The College of Business (COB) engaged in an intensive college-wide strategic planning process from April, 2014-December, 2015 to develop the

More information

MINIMUM NAMED ENDOWMENT AND FUND LEVELS POLICY

MINIMUM NAMED ENDOWMENT AND FUND LEVELS POLICY MINIMUM NAMED ENDOWMENT AND FUND LEVELS POLICY The Montana State University Alumni Foundation (Alumni Foundation) Minimum Named Endowment & Fund Levels governance policy establishes the minimum contributions

More information

Submitted to the Faculty Senate APC by the Stillman School of Business September 2013

Submitted to the Faculty Senate APC by the Stillman School of Business September 2013 Proposal for New Graduate Accounting Certificate and Request for Approval to offer Accounting/Tax Certificates and Graduate Business Degree Programs at Verizon and other Corporate Locations Submitted to

More information

Fall and Winter 2012 Volume 10, Number 2. Leadership Perceptions of Trustee Involvement in Private College Decision Making

Fall and Winter 2012 Volume 10, Number 2. Leadership Perceptions of Trustee Involvement in Private College Decision Making Leadership Perceptions of Trustee Involvement in Private College Decision Making Adam A. Morris Everrett Smith Michael T. Miller University of Arkansas Abstract The current study examined the perceptions

More information

forumcommentary Understanding the Business of Higher Education: Creating Context for Your Staff Development Plan

forumcommentary Understanding the Business of Higher Education: Creating Context for Your Staff Development Plan forumcommentary Understanding the Business of Higher Education: Creating Context for Your Staff Development Plan By Janet Ward Editor s note: A version of this article appeared in 2005 on the Web site

More information

Strategic Planning Procedure Manual

Strategic Planning Procedure Manual Strategic Planning Procedure Manual Adopted by the Strategic Planning Committee January 2003; revised December 2007, revised November 2011; revised September 2012; revised October 2014; revised June 2015

More information

Florida Gulf Coast University CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT PROCEDURES

Florida Gulf Coast University CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT PROCEDURES Florida Gulf Coast University CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT PROCEDURES Introduction The following descriptions and procedures are consistent with Regulation 8.011 Authorization of New Academic Degree Programs

More information

IT Governance Framework. Western Illinois University. September 2013

IT Governance Framework. Western Illinois University. September 2013 IT Governance Framework Western Illinois University September 2013 Developed by: Subcommittee on IT Governance of the University Technology Advisory Group v8.7 2 TABLE OF CONTENTS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY...

More information

Introduction Beginning in the Fall of 2011, the American University of Beirut is instituting a new 15-credit tuition policy for undergraduate

Introduction Beginning in the Fall of 2011, the American University of Beirut is instituting a new 15-credit tuition policy for undergraduate Introduction Beginning in the Fall of 2011, the American University of Beirut is instituting a new 15-credit tuition policy for undergraduate students along with an expanded financial aid program. This

More information

USM COMMITTEE ON MEES: RE-ENVISIONING A SYSTEM LEVEL GRADUATE PROGRAM IN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

USM COMMITTEE ON MEES: RE-ENVISIONING A SYSTEM LEVEL GRADUATE PROGRAM IN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE USM COMMITTEE ON MEES: RE-ENVISIONING A SYSTEM LEVEL GRADUATE PROGRAM IN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE INTRODUCTION This report was prepared at the request of the University System of Maryland (USM) Academic Affairs

More information

nonprofit alert AUTHORS: Lisa M. Hix lmhix@venable.com 202.344.4793 Susan E. Golden sgolden@venable.com 212.370.6254

nonprofit alert AUTHORS: Lisa M. Hix lmhix@venable.com 202.344.4793 Susan E. Golden sgolden@venable.com 212.370.6254 nonprofit alert August 2013 AUTHORS: Lisa M. Hix lmhix@venable.com 202.344.4793 Susan E. Golden sgolden@venable.com 212.370.6254 Kristalyn J. Loson kjloson@venable.com 202.344.4522 Jeffrey S. Tenenbaum

More information

GUIDELINES FOR CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS

GUIDELINES FOR CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS GUIDELINES FOR CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS These guidelines are intended to increase uniformity at GW in the use of the terms for certificate programs and related non-degree programs and to set guidelines for

More information

Graduate Certificate Programs

Graduate Certificate Programs Graduate Certificate Programs General Guidelines and Formal Review Processes An academic program organizes courses and related activities for the achievement of specific learning outcomes. Academic programs

More information

FAQ s For University of Hartford Online (UH Online) Initiative

FAQ s For University of Hartford Online (UH Online) Initiative FAQ s For University of Hartford Online (UH Online) Initiative What is the UH Online Initiative? In connection with the strategic planning process, the University identified goals to building on its success

More information

Graduate Handbook. School of Architecture 2014-2015. ramesh@cmu.edu. dc1e@andrew.cmu.edu. scarter@andrew.cmu.edu

Graduate Handbook. School of Architecture 2014-2015. ramesh@cmu.edu. dc1e@andrew.cmu.edu. scarter@andrew.cmu.edu School of Architecture 2014-2015 Graduate Handbook CONTACT: Graduate Program Director Ramesh Krishnamurti ramesh@cmu.edu Graduate Program Coordinator Darlene Covington-Davis dc1e@andrew.cmu.edu Graduate

More information

Enrollment Management Consulting Report for the University of Rhode Island Executive Summary

Enrollment Management Consulting Report for the University of Rhode Island Executive Summary Enrollment Management Consulting Report for the University of Rhode Island Executive Summary Prepared by Don Hossler Professor of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies Indiana University October, 2006

More information

FAQs Cal State Online

FAQs Cal State Online FAQs Cal State Online 1. What is Cal State Online? Cal State Online is a coordinated systemwide collection of services that not only support the delivery of online programs from systemwide campuses but

More information

Office of the President Phone: 774.455.7710 333 South Street, Suite 400 Fax: 774-455-7730

Office of the President Phone: 774.455.7710 333 South Street, Suite 400 Fax: 774-455-7730 Office of the President Phone: 774.455.7710 333 South Street, Suite 400 Fax: 774-455-7730 Shrewsbury, Massachusetts 01545 www.massachusetts.edu As part of the Commonwealth s budget process, the University

More information

Tuition Differential Fee Report

Tuition Differential Fee Report Tuition Differential Fee Report December, 2012 1 Table of Contents Executive Summary 2 Background 3 Tuition Differential Fee Proposals and Approval Process 4 2011-12 Tuition Differential Fee Summary 7

More information

PROPOSAL REVIEW/APPROVAL FLOWCHART and GUIDELINES for ADDING AN ONLINE/DISTANCE OPTION TO AN EXISTING GRADUATE DEGREE PROGRAM

PROPOSAL REVIEW/APPROVAL FLOWCHART and GUIDELINES for ADDING AN ONLINE/DISTANCE OPTION TO AN EXISTING GRADUATE DEGREE PROGRAM APPENDIX L PROPOSAL REVIEW/APPROVAL FLOWCHART and GUIDELINES for ADDING AN ONLINE/DISTANCE OPTION TO AN EXISTING GRADUATE DEGREE PROGRAM A. CONCEPT PAPER (two pages) 1. addressed to the dean of the Graduate

More information

Beginning in February, the CFO will host the following 11 budget conferences for support units and auxiliaries, organized by officers:

Beginning in February, the CFO will host the following 11 budget conferences for support units and auxiliaries, organized by officers: To: From: Support Unit Vice Presidents Ken Kaiser, CFO and Treasurer Date: January 4, 2016 Re: Support Unit Budget Conferences and FY17 Budget Preparation It is time to begin building the FY2016-17 operating

More information

Office of Planning & Budgeting FY2016 Budget Development Campuses, Colleges and Schools

Office of Planning & Budgeting FY2016 Budget Development Campuses, Colleges and Schools UW Bothell/UW Tacoma, Seattle College/School Name: 1. Please provide a 1 2 page description with visualizations if possible of how you intend to grow or contract over the next five years. Please provide

More information

Ph.D. Program Handbook

Ph.D. Program Handbook Ph.D. Program Handbook School of International Service American University Academic Year 2011-12 Edition Table of Contents Academic Year 2011-12 Edition... i Introduction... ivv Purpose of this Handbook...

More information

Assessment Landscape at Duke University July 2014. Executive Summary

Assessment Landscape at Duke University July 2014. Executive Summary 1 Assessment Landscape at Duke University July 2014 Executive Summary Assessment is becoming an integral and vital part of the academic culture at Duke. As every campus constituency can benefit from regular

More information

Professionalisation of management and leadership

Professionalisation of management and leadership Sheila Gupta Professionalisation of management and leadership Sheila Gupta, Director of Human Resources, Edinburgh University This article shows the importance of appropriate governance and management

More information