Name: Date: Use the following to answer questions 2-4:

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "Name: Date: Use the following to answer questions 2-4:"

Transcription

1 Name: Date: 1. A phenomenon is observed many, many times under identical conditions. The proportion of times a particular event A occurs is recorded. What does this proportion represent? A) The probability of the event A. B) The distribution of the event A. C) The correlation of the event A. D) The variance of the event A. Use the following to answer questions 2-4: A standard deck of cards has 52 cards. The cards have one of 2 colors: 26 cards in the deck are red and 26 are black. The cards have one of 4 denominations: 13 cards are hearts (red), 13 cards are diamonds (red), 13 cards are clubs (black), and 13 cards are spades (black). 2. One card is selected at random and the denomination is recorded. Which of the following is the correct sample space S for the set of possible outcomes? A) S = {red, black} B) S = {red, red, black, black} C) S = {hearts, diamonds, clubs, spades} D) S = {red, black, hearts, diamonds, clubs, spades 3. Two cards are selected at random and the denomination is recorded. The event H is defined as the event that the first card is hearts. Which of the following correctly defines event H? A) H = {diamonds, clubs, spades} B) H = {hearts, diamonds, clubs, spades} C) H = {(hearts, diamonds), (hearts, clubs), (hearts, spades)} D) H = {(hearts, diamonds), (hearts, clubs), (hearts, spades), (hearts, hearts)} 4. Two cards are selected at random. Event C is defined as the event that the first card is clubs, event R as the event that the first card is red, and event B as the event that the second card is black. Which events are disjoint? A) R and B only. B) R and C only. C) R and B, R and C, but not B and C. D) None of the events are disjoint. Page 1

2 Use the following to answer questions 5-7: If you draw an M&M candy at random from a bag of the candies, the candy you draw will have one of six colors. The probability of drawing each color depends on the proportion of each color among all candies made. Assume the table below gives the probabilities for the color of a randomly chosen M&M: Color Brown Red Yellow Green Orange Blue Probability ? What is the probability of drawing a yellow candy? A) 0.1 B) 0.2 C) 0.3 D) Impossible to determine from the information given. 6. What is the probability that you draw neither a brown nor a green candy? A) 0.3 B) 0.6 C) 0.7 D) If you select two M&M's and the colors are independent, then what is the probability that both are the same color? A) 0.01 B) 0.09 C) 0.22 D) 0.25 Page 2

3 8. Suppose a fair coin is flipped twice and the number of heads is counted. Which of the following is a valid probability model for the number of heads observed in two flips? A) B) C) D) None of the above. Use the following to answer questions 9-11: Ignoring twins and other multiple births, assume babies born at a hospital are independent events with the probability that a baby is a boy and the probability that a baby is a girl both equal to What is the probability that the next three babies are of the same sex? A) B) C) D) Define events A = {the next two babies are boys} and B = {at least one of the next two babies is a boy}. What do we know about events A and B? A) They are disjoint. B) They are complements. C) They are independent. D) None of the above. 11. Define event B = {at least one of the next two babies is a boy}. What is the probability of the complement of event B? A) B) C) D) Page 3

4 Use the following to answer question 12: Consider the following probability histogram for a discrete random variable X: 12. What is P(X 3)? A) 0.10 B) 0.25 C) 0.35 D) The following table describes the probability distribution for the random variable X that counts the number of times a customer visits a grocery store in a 1-week period: Visits or more P(Visits) ? 0.1 The value of the entry in the table for 3 Visits should be: A) 0.2 B) 0.55 C) 0.75 D) 0.25 E) 0.35 Page 4

5 14. Consider the following probability distribution for a discrete random variable X: X P(X = x) What is the P{X 5.5}? A) 0.45 B) 0.75 C) 0.20 D) 0 E) Unable to determine because X is discrete and can't take on the value 5.5. Use the following to answer question 15: Suppose that the random variable X is continuous and takes its values uniformly over the interval from 0 to What is P{X = 1.5 or X = 0.4}? A) 0.75 B) 0.25 C) 0.20 D) 0.80 E) 0 Use the following to answer questions 16-17: Suppose there are three balls in a box. On one of the balls is the number 1, on another is the number 2, and on the third is the number 3. You select two balls at random and without replacement from the box and note the two numbers observed. The sample space S consists of the three equally likely outcomes {(1, 2), (1, 3), (2, 3)} (disregarding order). Let X be the sum of the two balls selected. 16. What is the probability that the sum is at least 4? A) 0 B) 1 3 C) 2 3 D) What is the mean of X? A) 2.0 B) 2.33 C) 4.0 D) 4.33 Page 5

6 Use the following to answer questions 18-20: Let the random variable X be the number of repair calls that an appliance repair shop may receive during an hour. The distribution of X is given below: Value of X Probability What is the value of the missing probability? A) 2 B) 0.2 C) 0.02 D) What is the probability that the repair shop receives at least three repair calls during an hour? A) 0.18 B) 0.2 C) 0.38 D) What is the expected number of repair calls during an hour? A) One call per hour. B) 1.88 calls per hour. C) Two calls per hour. D) More than two calls per hour. 21. Andy has a (toy) garage that is supposed to have four cars in it. According to Andy, X = the number of cars that are actually in the garage at any given time follows the following distribution: Value of X Probability According to this model, what is the average number of cars that are in the garage at any given time? A) 3 cars B) 3.83 cars C) 3.92 cars D) 4 cars Page 6

7 Use the following to answer questions 22-23: Suppose that a college determines the following distribution for X = number of courses taken by a full-time student this semester: Value of X Probability What is the standard deviation of the number of courses full-time students at this college take this semester? A) 0.89 classes B) 0.94 classes C) 1 class D) classes 23. What is P(X > 4.74)? A) 0.25 B) 0.28 C) 0.53 D) Impossible to calculate, because X cannot be Use the following to answer questions 24-27: The weight of medium-size tomatoes selected at random from a bin at the local supermarket is a random variable with mean µ = 10 oz. and standard deviation σ = 1 oz. 24. Suppose we pick four tomatoes from the bin at random and put them in a bag. Define the random variable Y = the weight of the bag containing the four tomatoes. What is the mean of the random variable Y? A) µy = 2.5 oz B) µy = 4 oz. C) µy = 10 oz D) µy = 40 oz Page 7

8 25. Suppose we pick four tomatoes from the bin at random and put them in a bag. Define the random variable Y = the weight of the bag containing the four tomatoes. What is the standard deviation of the random variable Y? A) σy = 0.50 oz B) σy = 1.0 oz C) σy = 2.0 oz D) σy = 4.0 oz 26. Let the random variable W = the weight of the tomatoes in pounds (1 pound = 16 oz). What is the standard deviation of the random variable W? A) σw = 1 16 pound B) σw = 1 pound C) σw = 16 pounds D) σw = 256 pounds 27. Suppose we pick two tomatoes at random from the bin. Let the random variable V = the difference in the weights of the two tomatoes selected (the weight of the first tomato minus the weight of the second tomato). What is the standard deviation of the random variable V? A) σv = 0.00 oz B) σv = 1.00 oz. C) σv = 1.41 oz D) σv = 2.00 oz 28. A random variable X has mean µ = 9 and a standard deviation σ = 2. The random variable X is multiplied by the constant 3 to create a new variable Y, i.e., Y = 3X. What is the variance of Y? A) 36 B) 12 C) 27 D) 6 E) Unable to determine with the information provided. Page 8

9 Answer Key 1. A 2. C 3. D 4. B 5. A 6. B 7. C 8. A 9. B 10. D 11. B 12. D 13. D 14. A 15. E 16. C 17. C 18. B 19. C 20. B 21. B 22. B 23. C 24. D 25. C 26. A 27. C 28. A Page 9

MAT 1000. Mathematics in Today's World

MAT 1000. Mathematics in Today's World MAT 1000 Mathematics in Today's World We talked about Cryptography Last Time We will talk about probability. Today There are four rules that govern probabilities. One good way to analyze simple probabilities

More information

AP Stats - Probability Review

AP Stats - Probability Review AP Stats - Probability Review Multiple Choice Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question. 1. I toss a penny and observe whether it lands heads up or tails up. Suppose

More information

Find the indicated probability. 1) If a single fair die is rolled, find the probability of a 4 given that the number rolled is odd.

Find the indicated probability. 1) If a single fair die is rolled, find the probability of a 4 given that the number rolled is odd. Math 0 Practice Test 3 Fall 2009 Covers 7.5, 8.-8.3 MULTIPLE CHOICE. Choose the one alternative that best completes the statement or answers the question. Find the indicated probability. ) If a single

More information

Exam. Name. How many distinguishable permutations of letters are possible in the word? 1) CRITICS

Exam. Name. How many distinguishable permutations of letters are possible in the word? 1) CRITICS Exam Name How many distinguishable permutations of letters are possible in the word? 1) CRITICS 2) GIGGLE An order of award presentations has been devised for seven people: Jeff, Karen, Lyle, Maria, Norm,

More information

Statistics 100A Homework 2 Solutions

Statistics 100A Homework 2 Solutions Statistics Homework Solutions Ryan Rosario Chapter 9. retail establishment accepts either the merican Express or the VIS credit card. total of percent of its customers carry an merican Express card, 6

More information

Lesson 1. Basics of Probability. Principles of Mathematics 12: Explained! www.math12.com 314

Lesson 1. Basics of Probability. Principles of Mathematics 12: Explained! www.math12.com 314 Lesson 1 Basics of Probability www.math12.com 314 Sample Spaces: Probability Lesson 1 Part I: Basic Elements of Probability Consider the following situation: A six sided die is rolled The sample space

More information

number of favorable outcomes total number of outcomes number of times event E occurred number of times the experiment was performed.

number of favorable outcomes total number of outcomes number of times event E occurred number of times the experiment was performed. 12 Probability 12.1 Basic Concepts Start with some Definitions: Experiment: Any observation of measurement of a random phenomenon is an experiment. Outcomes: Any result of an experiment is called an outcome.

More information

Math 3C Homework 3 Solutions

Math 3C Homework 3 Solutions Math 3C Homework 3 s Ilhwan Jo and Akemi Kashiwada ilhwanjo@math.ucla.edu, akashiwada@ucla.edu Assignment: Section 2.3 Problems 2, 7, 8, 9,, 3, 5, 8, 2, 22, 29, 3, 32 2. You draw three cards from a standard

More information

Probability: The Study of Randomness Randomness and Probability Models. IPS Chapters 4 Sections 4.1 4.2

Probability: The Study of Randomness Randomness and Probability Models. IPS Chapters 4 Sections 4.1 4.2 Probability: The Study of Randomness Randomness and Probability Models IPS Chapters 4 Sections 4.1 4.2 Chapter 4 Overview Key Concepts Random Experiment/Process Sample Space Events Probability Models Probability

More information

MULTIPLE CHOICE. Choose the one alternative that best completes the statement or answers the question. C) (a) 2. (b) 1.5. (c) 0.5-2.

MULTIPLE CHOICE. Choose the one alternative that best completes the statement or answers the question. C) (a) 2. (b) 1.5. (c) 0.5-2. Stats: Test 1 Review Name MULTIPLE CHOICE. Choose the one alternative that best completes the statement or answers the question. Use the given frequency distribution to find the (a) class width. (b) class

More information

Chapter 4 & 5 practice set. The actual exam is not multiple choice nor does it contain like questions.

Chapter 4 & 5 practice set. The actual exam is not multiple choice nor does it contain like questions. Chapter 4 & 5 practice set. The actual exam is not multiple choice nor does it contain like questions. MULTIPLE CHOICE. Choose the one alternative that best completes the statement or answers the question.

More information

Stats Review Chapters 5-6

Stats Review Chapters 5-6 Stats Review Chapters 5-6 Created by Teri Johnson Math Coordinator, Mary Stangler Center for Academic Success Examples are taken from Statistics 4 E by Michael Sullivan, III And the corresponding Test

More information

STAT 35A HW2 Solutions

STAT 35A HW2 Solutions STAT 35A HW2 Solutions http://www.stat.ucla.edu/~dinov/courses_students.dir/09/spring/stat35.dir 1. A computer consulting firm presently has bids out on three projects. Let A i = { awarded project i },

More information

The statistics of a particular basketball player state that he makes 4 out of 5 free-throw attempts.

The statistics of a particular basketball player state that he makes 4 out of 5 free-throw attempts. Name: Date: Use the following to answer question 1: The statistics of a particular basketball player state that he makes 4 out of 5 free-throw attempts. 1. The basketball player is just about to attempt

More information

Contemporary Mathematics- MAT 130. Probability. a) What is the probability of obtaining a number less than 4?

Contemporary Mathematics- MAT 130. Probability. a) What is the probability of obtaining a number less than 4? Contemporary Mathematics- MAT 30 Solve the following problems:. A fair die is tossed. What is the probability of obtaining a number less than 4? What is the probability of obtaining a number less than

More information

Basic Probability Theory II

Basic Probability Theory II RECAP Basic Probability heory II Dr. om Ilvento FREC 408 We said the approach to establishing probabilities for events is to Define the experiment List the sample points Assign probabilities to the sample

More information

Determine the empirical probability that a person selected at random from the 1000 surveyed uses Mastercard.

Determine the empirical probability that a person selected at random from the 1000 surveyed uses Mastercard. Math 120 Practice Exam II Name You must show work for credit. 1) A pair of fair dice is rolled 50 times and the sum of the dots on the faces is noted. Outcome 2 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Frequency 6 8 8 1 5

More information

Remember to leave your answers as unreduced fractions.

Remember to leave your answers as unreduced fractions. Probability Worksheet 2 NAME: Remember to leave your answers as unreduced fractions. We will work with the example of picking poker cards out of a deck. A poker deck contains four suits: diamonds, hearts,

More information

Probability: The Study of Randomness Randomness and Probability Models

Probability: The Study of Randomness Randomness and Probability Models Probability: The Study of Randomness Randomness and Probability Models IPS Chapters 4.1 and 4.2 2009 W.H. Freeman and Company Objectives (IPS Chapters 4.1 and 4.2) Randomness and Probability models Probability

More information

Homework 2 Solutions

Homework 2 Solutions CSE 21 - Winter 2012 Homework #2 Homework 2 Solutions 2.1 In this homework, we will consider ordinary decks of playing cards which have 52 cards, with 13 of each of the four suits (Hearts, Spades, Diamonds

More information

Basic Probability. Probability: The part of Mathematics devoted to quantify uncertainty

Basic Probability. Probability: The part of Mathematics devoted to quantify uncertainty AMS 5 PROBABILITY Basic Probability Probability: The part of Mathematics devoted to quantify uncertainty Frequency Theory Bayesian Theory Game: Playing Backgammon. The chance of getting (6,6) is 1/36.

More information

Contemporary Mathematics Online Math 1030 Sample Exam I Chapters 12-14 No Time Limit No Scratch Paper Calculator Allowed: Scientific

Contemporary Mathematics Online Math 1030 Sample Exam I Chapters 12-14 No Time Limit No Scratch Paper Calculator Allowed: Scientific Contemporary Mathematics Online Math 1030 Sample Exam I Chapters 12-14 No Time Limit No Scratch Paper Calculator Allowed: Scientific Name: The point value of each problem is in the left-hand margin. You

More information

Topic : Probability of a Complement of an Event- Worksheet 1. Do the following:

Topic : Probability of a Complement of an Event- Worksheet 1. Do the following: Topic : Probability of a Complement of an Event- Worksheet 1 1. You roll a die. What is the probability that 2 will not appear 2. Two 6-sided dice are rolled. What is the 3. Ray and Shan are playing football.

More information

SHORT ANSWER. Write the word or phrase that best completes each statement or answers the question. Regular smoker

SHORT ANSWER. Write the word or phrase that best completes each statement or answers the question. Regular smoker Exam Chapters 4&5 Review SHORT ANSWER. Write the word or phrase that best completes each statement or answers the question. Provide an appropriate response. 1) A 28-year-old man pays $181 for a one-year

More information

Conducting Probability Experiments

Conducting Probability Experiments CHAPTE Conducting Probability Experiments oal Compare probabilities in two experiments. ame. Place a shuffled deck of cards face down.. Turn over the top card.. If the card is an ace, you get points. A

More information

AP Statistics 7!3! 6!

AP Statistics 7!3! 6! Lesson 6-4 Introduction to Binomial Distributions Factorials 3!= Definition: n! = n( n 1)( n 2)...(3)(2)(1), n 0 Note: 0! = 1 (by definition) Ex. #1 Evaluate: a) 5! b) 3!(4!) c) 7!3! 6! d) 22! 21! 20!

More information

Section 6.1 Discrete Random variables Probability Distribution

Section 6.1 Discrete Random variables Probability Distribution Section 6.1 Discrete Random variables Probability Distribution Definitions a) Random variable is a variable whose values are determined by chance. b) Discrete Probability distribution consists of the values

More information

Question of the Day. Key Concepts. Vocabulary. Mathematical Ideas. QuestionofDay

Question of the Day. Key Concepts. Vocabulary. Mathematical Ideas. QuestionofDay QuestionofDay Question of the Day What is the probability that in a family with two children, both are boys? What is the probability that in a family with two children, both are boys, if we already know

More information

Lesson 1: Experimental and Theoretical Probability

Lesson 1: Experimental and Theoretical Probability Lesson 1: Experimental and Theoretical Probability Probability is the study of randomness. For instance, weather is random. In probability, the goal is to determine the chances of certain events happening.

More information

Coin Flip Questions. Suppose you flip a coin five times and write down the sequence of results, like HHHHH or HTTHT.

Coin Flip Questions. Suppose you flip a coin five times and write down the sequence of results, like HHHHH or HTTHT. Coin Flip Questions Suppose you flip a coin five times and write down the sequence of results, like HHHHH or HTTHT. 1 How many ways can you get exactly 1 head? 2 How many ways can you get exactly 2 heads?

More information

Slide 1 Math 1520, Lecture 23. This lecture covers mean, median, mode, odds, and expected value.

Slide 1 Math 1520, Lecture 23. This lecture covers mean, median, mode, odds, and expected value. Slide 1 Math 1520, Lecture 23 This lecture covers mean, median, mode, odds, and expected value. Slide 2 Mean, Median and Mode Mean, Median and mode are 3 concepts used to get a sense of the central tendencies

More information

(b) You draw two balls from an urn and track the colors. When you start, it contains three blue balls and one red ball.

(b) You draw two balls from an urn and track the colors. When you start, it contains three blue balls and one red ball. Examples for Chapter 3 Probability Math 1040-1 Section 3.1 1. Draw a tree diagram for each of the following situations. State the size of the sample space. (a) You flip a coin three times. (b) You draw

More information

The Binomial Probability Distribution

The Binomial Probability Distribution The Binomial Probability Distribution MATH 130, Elements of Statistics I J. Robert Buchanan Department of Mathematics Fall 2015 Objectives After this lesson we will be able to: determine whether a probability

More information

Review for Test 2. Chapters 4, 5 and 6

Review for Test 2. Chapters 4, 5 and 6 Review for Test 2 Chapters 4, 5 and 6 1. You roll a fair six-sided die. Find the probability of each event: a. Event A: rolling a 3 1/6 b. Event B: rolling a 7 0 c. Event C: rolling a number less than

More information

High School Statistics and Probability Common Core Sample Test Version 2

High School Statistics and Probability Common Core Sample Test Version 2 High School Statistics and Probability Common Core Sample Test Version 2 Our High School Statistics and Probability sample test covers the twenty most common questions that we see targeted for this level.

More information

The Goodness-of-Fit Test

The Goodness-of-Fit Test on the Lecture 49 Section 14.3 Hampden-Sydney College Tue, Apr 21, 2009 Outline 1 on the 2 3 on the 4 5 Hypotheses on the (Steps 1 and 2) (1) H 0 : H 1 : H 0 is false. (2) α = 0.05. p 1 = 0.24 p 2 = 0.20

More information

Sample Term Test 2A. 1. A variable X has a distribution which is described by the density curve shown below:

Sample Term Test 2A. 1. A variable X has a distribution which is described by the density curve shown below: Sample Term Test 2A 1. A variable X has a distribution which is described by the density curve shown below: What proportion of values of X fall between 1 and 6? (A) 0.550 (B) 0.575 (C) 0.600 (D) 0.625

More information

Unit 21: Binomial Distributions

Unit 21: Binomial Distributions Unit 21: Binomial Distributions Summary of Video In Unit 20, we learned that in the world of random phenomena, probability models provide us with a list of all possible outcomes and probabilities for how

More information

Basic concepts in probability. Sue Gordon

Basic concepts in probability. Sue Gordon Mathematics Learning Centre Basic concepts in probability Sue Gordon c 2005 University of Sydney Mathematics Learning Centre, University of Sydney 1 1 Set Notation You may omit this section if you are

More information

Formula for Theoretical Probability

Formula for Theoretical Probability Notes Name: Date: Period: Probability I. Probability A. Vocabulary is the chance/ likelihood of some event occurring. Ex) The probability of rolling a for a six-faced die is 6. It is read as in 6 or out

More information

STT 200 LECTURE 1, SECTION 2,4 RECITATION 7 (10/16/2012)

STT 200 LECTURE 1, SECTION 2,4 RECITATION 7 (10/16/2012) STT 200 LECTURE 1, SECTION 2,4 RECITATION 7 (10/16/2012) TA: Zhen (Alan) Zhang zhangz19@stt.msu.edu Office hour: (C500 WH) 1:45 2:45PM Tuesday (office tel.: 432-3342) Help-room: (A102 WH) 11:20AM-12:30PM,

More information

Probability & Probability Distributions

Probability & Probability Distributions Probability & Probability Distributions Carolyn J. Anderson EdPsych 580 Fall 2005 Probability & Probability Distributions p. 1/61 Probability & Probability Distributions Elementary Probability Theory Definitions

More information

Statistics 151 Practice Midterm 1 Mike Kowalski

Statistics 151 Practice Midterm 1 Mike Kowalski Statistics 151 Practice Midterm 1 Mike Kowalski Statistics 151 Practice Midterm 1 Multiple Choice (50 minutes) Instructions: 1. This is a closed book exam. 2. You may use the STAT 151 formula sheets and

More information

Exam 3 Review/WIR 9 These problems will be started in class on April 7 and continued on April 8 at the WIR.

Exam 3 Review/WIR 9 These problems will be started in class on April 7 and continued on April 8 at the WIR. Exam 3 Review/WIR 9 These problems will be started in class on April 7 and continued on April 8 at the WIR. 1. Urn A contains 6 white marbles and 4 red marbles. Urn B contains 3 red marbles and two white

More information

Math 55: Discrete Mathematics

Math 55: Discrete Mathematics Math 55: Discrete Mathematics UC Berkeley, Fall 2011 Homework # 7, due Wedneday, March 14 Happy Pi Day! (If any errors are spotted, please email them to morrison at math dot berkeley dot edu..5.10 A croissant

More information

MATHEMATICS 154, SPRING 2010 PROBABILITY THEORY Outline #3 (Combinatorics, bridge, poker)

MATHEMATICS 154, SPRING 2010 PROBABILITY THEORY Outline #3 (Combinatorics, bridge, poker) Last modified: February, 00 References: MATHEMATICS 5, SPRING 00 PROBABILITY THEORY Outline # (Combinatorics, bridge, poker) PRP(Probability and Random Processes, by Grimmett and Stirzaker), Section.7.

More information

AP Stats Fall Final Review Ch. 5, 6

AP Stats Fall Final Review Ch. 5, 6 AP Stats Fall Final Review 2015 - Ch. 5, 6 Multiple Choice Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question. 1. I toss a penny and observe whether it lands heads up or tails

More information

Math 210. 1. Compute C(1000,2) (a) 499500. (b) 1000000. (c) 2. (d) 999000. (e) None of the above.

Math 210. 1. Compute C(1000,2) (a) 499500. (b) 1000000. (c) 2. (d) 999000. (e) None of the above. Math 210 1. Compute C(1000,2) (a) 499500. (b) 1000000. (c) 2. (d) 999000. 2. Suppose that 80% of students taking calculus have previously had a trigonometry course. Of those that did, 75% pass their calculus

More information

Washington State K 8 Mathematics Standards April 2008

Washington State K 8 Mathematics Standards April 2008 Washington State K 8 Mathematics Standards Data Analysis, Statistics, and Probability Strand In kindergarten through grade 5, students learn a variety of ways to display data, and they interpret data to

More information

Chapter 4 - Practice Problems 1

Chapter 4 - Practice Problems 1 Chapter 4 - Practice Problems SHORT ANSWER. Write the word or phrase that best completes each statement or answers the question. Provide an appropriate response. ) Compare the relative frequency formula

More information

6. Let X be a binomial random variable with distribution B(10, 0.6). What is the probability that X equals 8? A) (0.6) (0.4) B) 8! C) 45(0.6) (0.

6. Let X be a binomial random variable with distribution B(10, 0.6). What is the probability that X equals 8? A) (0.6) (0.4) B) 8! C) 45(0.6) (0. Name: Date:. For each of the following scenarios, determine the appropriate distribution for the random variable X. A) A fair die is rolled seven times. Let X = the number of times we see an even number.

More information

Fundamentals of Probability

Fundamentals of Probability Fundamentals of Probability Introduction Probability is the likelihood that an event will occur under a set of given conditions. The probability of an event occurring has a value between 0 and 1. An impossible

More information

Remarks on the Concept of Probability

Remarks on the Concept of Probability 5. Probability A. Introduction B. Basic Concepts C. Permutations and Combinations D. Poisson Distribution E. Multinomial Distribution F. Hypergeometric Distribution G. Base Rates H. Exercises Probability

More information

Worked examples Basic Concepts of Probability Theory

Worked examples Basic Concepts of Probability Theory Worked examples Basic Concepts of Probability Theory Example 1 A regular tetrahedron is a body that has four faces and, if is tossed, the probability that it lands on any face is 1/4. Suppose that one

More information

Random Variables. 9. Variation 1. Find the standard deviations of the random variables in Exercise 1.

Random Variables. 9. Variation 1. Find the standard deviations of the random variables in Exercise 1. Random Variables 1. Expected value. Find the expected value of each random variable: a) x 10 20 30 P(X=x) 0.3 0.5 0.2 b) x 2 4 6 8 P(X=x) 0.3 0.4 0.2 0.1 2. Expected value. Find the expected value of each

More information

PROBABILITY. Chapter Overview

PROBABILITY. Chapter Overview Chapter 6 PROBABILITY 6. Overview Probability is defined as a quantitative measure of uncertainty a numerical value that conveys the strength of our belief in the occurrence of an event. The probability

More information

What is the probability of throwing a fair die and receiving a six? Introduction to Probability. Basic Concepts

What is the probability of throwing a fair die and receiving a six? Introduction to Probability. Basic Concepts Basic Concepts Introduction to Probability A probability experiment is any experiment whose outcomes relies purely on chance (e.g. throwing a die). It has several possible outcomes, collectively called

More information

( ) = 1 x. ! 2x = 2. The region where that joint density is positive is indicated with dotted lines in the graph below. y = x

( ) = 1 x. ! 2x = 2. The region where that joint density is positive is indicated with dotted lines in the graph below. y = x Errata for the ASM Study Manual for Exam P, Eleventh Edition By Dr. Krzysztof M. Ostaszewski, FSA, CERA, FSAS, CFA, MAAA Web site: http://www.krzysio.net E-mail: krzysio@krzysio.net Posted September 21,

More information

Section 6.2 Definition of Probability

Section 6.2 Definition of Probability Section 6.2 Definition of Probability Probability is a measure of the likelihood that an event occurs. For example, if there is a 20% chance of rain tomorrow, that means that the probability that it will

More information

Probability. Sample space: all the possible outcomes of a probability experiment, i.e., the population of outcomes

Probability. Sample space: all the possible outcomes of a probability experiment, i.e., the population of outcomes Probability Basic Concepts: Probability experiment: process that leads to welldefined results, called outcomes Outcome: result of a single trial of a probability experiment (a datum) Sample space: all

More information

A probability experiment is a chance process that leads to well-defined outcomes. 3) What is the difference between an outcome and an event?

A probability experiment is a chance process that leads to well-defined outcomes. 3) What is the difference between an outcome and an event? Ch 4.2 pg.191~(1-10 all), 12 (a, c, e, g), 13, 14, (a, b, c, d, e, h, i, j), 17, 21, 25, 31, 32. 1) What is a probability experiment? A probability experiment is a chance process that leads to well-defined

More information

Combinations If 5 sprinters compete in a race, how many different ways can the medals for first, second and third place, be awarded

Combinations If 5 sprinters compete in a race, how many different ways can the medals for first, second and third place, be awarded Combinations If 5 sprinters compete in a race, how many different ways can the medals for first, second and third place, be awarded If 5 sprinters compete in a race and the fastest 3 qualify for the relay

More information

I. WHAT IS PROBABILITY?

I. WHAT IS PROBABILITY? C HAPTER 3 PROBABILITY Random Experiments I. WHAT IS PROBABILITY? The weatherman on 0 o clock news program states that there is a 20% chance that it will snow tomorrow, a 65% chance that it will rain and

More information

X X AP Statistics Solutions to Packet 7 X Random Variables Discrete and Continuous Random Variables Means and Variances of Random Variables

X X AP Statistics Solutions to Packet 7 X Random Variables Discrete and Continuous Random Variables Means and Variances of Random Variables AP Statistics Solutions to Packet 7 Random Variables Discrete and Continuous Random Variables Means and Variances of Random Variables HW #44, 3, 6 8, 3 7 7. THREE CHILDREN A couple plans to have three

More information

PROBABILITY 14.3. section. The Probability of an Event

PROBABILITY 14.3. section. The Probability of an Event 4.3 Probability (4-3) 727 4.3 PROBABILITY In this section In the two preceding sections we were concerned with counting the number of different outcomes to an experiment. We now use those counting techniques

More information

11-1 Permutations and Combinations

11-1 Permutations and Combinations Fundamental Counting Principal 11-1 Permutations and Combinations Using the Fundamental Counting Principle 1a. A make-your-own-adventure story lets you choose 6 starting points, gives 4 plot choices, and

More information

V. RANDOM VARIABLES, PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTIONS, EXPECTED VALUE

V. RANDOM VARIABLES, PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTIONS, EXPECTED VALUE V. RANDOM VARIABLES, PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTIONS, EXPETED VALUE A game of chance featured at an amusement park is played as follows: You pay $ to play. A penny and a nickel are flipped. You win $ if either

More information

Probability OPRE 6301

Probability OPRE 6301 Probability OPRE 6301 Random Experiment... Recall that our eventual goal in this course is to go from the random sample to the population. The theory that allows for this transition is the theory of probability.

More information

2. How many ways can the letters in PHOENIX be rearranged? 7! = 5,040 ways.

2. How many ways can the letters in PHOENIX be rearranged? 7! = 5,040 ways. Math 142 September 27, 2011 1. How many ways can 9 people be arranged in order? 9! = 362,880 ways 2. How many ways can the letters in PHOENIX be rearranged? 7! = 5,040 ways. 3. The letters in MATH are

More information

Chapter 14 From Randomness to Probability

Chapter 14 From Randomness to Probability 226 Part IV Randomness and Probability Chapter 14 From Randomness to Probability 1. Roulette. If a roulette wheel is to be considered truly random, then each outcome is equally likely to occur, and knowing

More information

Random Variables and Probability

Random Variables and Probability CHAPTER 9 Random Variables and Probability IN THIS CHAPTER Summary: We ve completed the basics of data analysis and we now begin the transition to inference. In order to do inference, we need to use the

More information

Lab 11. Simulations. The Concept

Lab 11. Simulations. The Concept Lab 11 Simulations In this lab you ll learn how to create simulations to provide approximate answers to probability questions. We ll make use of a particular kind of structure, called a box model, that

More information

Grades 7-8 Mathematics Training Test Answer Key

Grades 7-8 Mathematics Training Test Answer Key Grades -8 Mathematics Training Test Answer Key 04 . Factor 6x 9. A (3x 9) B 3(x 3) C 3(3x ) D 6(x 9) Option A is incorrect because the common factor of both terms is not and the expression is not factored

More information

Chapter 6. 1. What is the probability that a card chosen from an ordinary deck of 52 cards is an ace? Ans: 4/52.

Chapter 6. 1. What is the probability that a card chosen from an ordinary deck of 52 cards is an ace? Ans: 4/52. Chapter 6 1. What is the probability that a card chosen from an ordinary deck of 52 cards is an ace? 4/52. 2. What is the probability that a randomly selected integer chosen from the first 100 positive

More information

RANDOM VARIABLES MATH CIRCLE (ADVANCED) 3/3/2013. 3 k) ( 52 3 )

RANDOM VARIABLES MATH CIRCLE (ADVANCED) 3/3/2013. 3 k) ( 52 3 ) RANDOM VARIABLES MATH CIRCLE (ADVANCED) //0 0) a) Suppose you flip a fair coin times. i) What is the probability you get 0 heads? ii) head? iii) heads? iv) heads? For = 0,,,, P ( Heads) = ( ) b) Suppose

More information

Probability --QUESTIONS-- Principles of Math 12 - Probability Practice Exam 1 www.math12.com

Probability --QUESTIONS-- Principles of Math 12 - Probability Practice Exam 1 www.math12.com Probability --QUESTIONS-- Principles of Math - Probability Practice Exam www.math.com Principles of Math : Probability Practice Exam Use this sheet to record your answers:... 4... 4... 4.. 6. 4.. 6. 7..

More information

STATISTICS 8, FINAL EXAM. Last six digits of Student ID#: Circle your Discussion Section: 1 2 3 4

STATISTICS 8, FINAL EXAM. Last six digits of Student ID#: Circle your Discussion Section: 1 2 3 4 STATISTICS 8, FINAL EXAM NAME: KEY Seat Number: Last six digits of Student ID#: Circle your Discussion Section: 1 2 3 4 Make sure you have 8 pages. You will be provided with a table as well, as a separate

More information

Math 2001 Homework #10 Solutions

Math 2001 Homework #10 Solutions Math 00 Homework #0 Solutions. Section.: ab. For each map below, determine the number of southerly paths from point to point. Solution: We just have to use the same process as we did in building Pascal

More information

Probabilistic Strategies: Solutions

Probabilistic Strategies: Solutions Probability Victor Xu Probabilistic Strategies: Solutions Western PA ARML Practice April 3, 2016 1 Problems 1. You roll two 6-sided dice. What s the probability of rolling at least one 6? There is a 1

More information

MAS108 Probability I

MAS108 Probability I 1 QUEEN MARY UNIVERSITY OF LONDON 2:30 pm, Thursday 3 May, 2007 Duration: 2 hours MAS108 Probability I Do not start reading the question paper until you are instructed to by the invigilators. The paper

More information

Chapter 5 A Survey of Probability Concepts

Chapter 5 A Survey of Probability Concepts Chapter 5 A Survey of Probability Concepts True/False 1. Based on a classical approach, the probability of an event is defined as the number of favorable outcomes divided by the total number of possible

More information

X: 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Probability: 0.061 0.154 0.228 0.229 0.173 0.094 0.041 0.015 0.004 0.001

X: 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Probability: 0.061 0.154 0.228 0.229 0.173 0.094 0.041 0.015 0.004 0.001 Tuesday, January 17: 6.1 Discrete Random Variables Read 341 344 What is a random variable? Give some examples. What is a probability distribution? What is a discrete random variable? Give some examples.

More information

Solutions to Homework 6 Statistics 302 Professor Larget

Solutions to Homework 6 Statistics 302 Professor Larget s to Homework 6 Statistics 302 Professor Larget Textbook Exercises 5.29 (Graded for Completeness) What Proportion Have College Degrees? According to the US Census Bureau, about 27.5% of US adults over

More information

PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS

PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS Grade Level: Written by: Length of Unit: Middle School, Science and Math Monica Edwins, Twin Peaks Charter Academy, Longmont, Colorado Four Lessons, plus a Culminating Activity

More information

Math 150 Sample Exam #2

Math 150 Sample Exam #2 Problem 1. (16 points) TRUE or FALSE. a. 3 die are rolled, there are 1 possible outcomes. b. If two events are complementary, then they are mutually exclusive events. c. If A and B are two independent

More information

Name Please Print MULTIPLE CHOICE. Choose the one alternative that best completes the statement or answers the question.

Name Please Print MULTIPLE CHOICE. Choose the one alternative that best completes the statement or answers the question. Review Problems for Mid-Term 1, Fall 2012 (STA-120 Cal.Poly. Pomona) Name Please Print MULTIPLE CHOICE. Choose the one alternative that best completes the statement or answers the question. Determine whether

More information

Lecture 14. Chapter 7: Probability. Rule 1: Rule 2: Rule 3: Nancy Pfenning Stats 1000

Lecture 14. Chapter 7: Probability. Rule 1: Rule 2: Rule 3: Nancy Pfenning Stats 1000 Lecture 4 Nancy Pfenning Stats 000 Chapter 7: Probability Last time we established some basic definitions and rules of probability: Rule : P (A C ) = P (A). Rule 2: In general, the probability of one event

More information

AP Statistics Chapter 1 Test - Multiple Choice

AP Statistics Chapter 1 Test - Multiple Choice AP Statistics Chapter 1 Test - Multiple Choice Name: 1. The following bar graph gives the percent of owners of three brands of trucks who are satisfied with their truck. From this graph, we may conclude

More information

a) Find the five point summary for the home runs of the National League teams. b) What is the mean number of home runs by the American League teams?

a) Find the five point summary for the home runs of the National League teams. b) What is the mean number of home runs by the American League teams? 1. Phone surveys are sometimes used to rate TV shows. Such a survey records several variables listed below. Which ones of them are categorical and which are quantitative? - the number of people watching

More information

Lecture 5 : The Poisson Distribution

Lecture 5 : The Poisson Distribution Lecture 5 : The Poisson Distribution Jonathan Marchini November 10, 2008 1 Introduction Many experimental situations occur in which we observe the counts of events within a set unit of time, area, volume,

More information

https://assessment.casa.uh.edu/assessment/printtest.htm PRINTABLE VERSION Quiz 10

https://assessment.casa.uh.edu/assessment/printtest.htm PRINTABLE VERSION Quiz 10 1 of 8 4/9/2013 8:17 AM PRINTABLE VERSION Quiz 10 Question 1 Let A and B be events in a sample space S such that P(A) = 0.34, P(B) = 0.39 and P(A B) = 0.19. Find P(A B). a) 0.4872 b) 0.5588 c) 0.0256 d)

More information

Joint Exam 1/P Sample Exam 1

Joint Exam 1/P Sample Exam 1 Joint Exam 1/P Sample Exam 1 Take this practice exam under strict exam conditions: Set a timer for 3 hours; Do not stop the timer for restroom breaks; Do not look at your notes. If you believe a question

More information

1. Let A, B and C are three events such that P(A) = 0.45, P(B) = 0.30, P(C) = 0.35,

1. Let A, B and C are three events such that P(A) = 0.45, P(B) = 0.30, P(C) = 0.35, 1. Let A, B and C are three events such that PA =.4, PB =.3, PC =.3, P A B =.6, P A C =.6, P B C =., P A B C =.7. a Compute P A B, P A C, P B C. b Compute P A B C. c Compute the probability that exactly

More information

MULTIPLE CHOICE. Choose the one alternative that best completes the statement or answers the question.

MULTIPLE CHOICE. Choose the one alternative that best completes the statement or answers the question. Final Exam Review MULTIPLE CHOICE. Choose the one alternative that best completes the statement or answers the question. 1) A researcher for an airline interviews all of the passengers on five randomly

More information

Lecture 1 Introduction Properties of Probability Methods of Enumeration Asrat Temesgen Stockholm University

Lecture 1 Introduction Properties of Probability Methods of Enumeration Asrat Temesgen Stockholm University Lecture 1 Introduction Properties of Probability Methods of Enumeration Asrat Temesgen Stockholm University 1 Chapter 1 Probability 1.1 Basic Concepts In the study of statistics, we consider experiments

More information

OPRE504 Chapter Study Guide Chapter 7 Randomness and Probability. Terminology of Probability. Probability Rules:

OPRE504 Chapter Study Guide Chapter 7 Randomness and Probability. Terminology of Probability. Probability Rules: OPRE504 Chapter Study Guide Chapter 7 Randomness and Probability Terminology of Probability For a Random phenomenon, there are a number of possible Outcomes. For example, tossing a coin could result in

More information

Homework 20: Compound Probability

Homework 20: Compound Probability Homework 20: Compound Probability Definition The probability of an event is defined to be the ratio of times that you expect the event to occur after many trials: number of equally likely outcomes resulting

More information

MULTIPLE CHOICE. Choose the one alternative that best completes the statement or answers the question.

MULTIPLE CHOICE. Choose the one alternative that best completes the statement or answers the question. Exam Name MULTIPLE CHOICE. Choose the one alternative that best completes the statement or answers the question. Find the mean for the given sample data. 1) Bill kept track of the number of hours he spent

More information

Random variables, probability distributions, binomial random variable

Random variables, probability distributions, binomial random variable Week 4 lecture notes. WEEK 4 page 1 Random variables, probability distributions, binomial random variable Eample 1 : Consider the eperiment of flipping a fair coin three times. The number of tails that

More information

Math 58. Rumbos Fall 2008 1. Solutions to Review Problems for Exam 2

Math 58. Rumbos Fall 2008 1. Solutions to Review Problems for Exam 2 Math 58. Rumbos Fall 2008 1 Solutions to Review Problems for Exam 2 1. For each of the following scenarios, determine whether the binomial distribution is the appropriate distribution for the random variable

More information