SCHOOL OF EDUCATION EMPOWERMENT FOR LEARNING PROGRAM SUBMISSION. ESL Endorsement Initial Level

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1 SCHOOL OF EDUCATION EMPOWERMENT FOR LEARNING PROGRAM SUBMISSION ESL Endorsement Initial Level September 2011 Date Revised: January 2012 Catalog URL: 1

2 Campbellsville University School of Education ESL Endorsement Date Submitted: September 15, 2011 Signature: Brenda A. Priddy, Ed. D. Dean of School of Education 2

3 Table of Contents (Note: The pagination is accurate with all four margins set at 1 inch.) I. Relationship of Program with the Unit s Conceptual Framework... 4 II. Relationship of Program with the Unit s Continuous Assessment... 4 III. Description of Courses and Experiences... 6 IV. Integration of Kentucky Teacher Standards... 7 V. Incorporation of National Content Standards... 9 VI. KY P-12 Curricular Documents Program of Studies Kentucky Core Academic Standards Core Content VII. Integration of EPSB Themes Diversity Assessment Literacy Education Closing the Achievement Gap Page VIII. Program Faculty IX. Syllabi X. Curriculum Contract/Guide

4 Campbellsville University School of Education English as a Second Language Endorsement, Grades P-12 Program Requirements II. Relationship of Program with the Unit s Conceptual Framework The TESL Endorsement program shares the same conceptual framework as the other School of Education programs. It supports the theme Empowerment for Learning by giving teachers the skills and tools necessary to do exactly that for their LEP students. By having a better grasp on how to help their LEP students, teachers will be able to empower their students not only to learn English, but also content. III. Relationship of Program with the Unit s Continuous Assessment Plan The TESL Endorsement program at the initial level shares the same continuous assessment plan as the other School of Education programs, if students are enrolled in the regular education program at the undergraduate level and the endorsement concurrently. The continuous assessment plan is the system by which candidates at the initial are evaluated. It is comprised of candidate assessment points (CAPs) that are data collection points for monitoring student progress in the program. There are four CAPs at the initial level of certification (undergraduate level). CAP 1 is intent to apply for admission; CAP 2, admission; CAP 3, application to student teach; CAP 4, program exit. All CAPs include criteria for academic achievement, disposition evaluations, and commitment to the KY Code of Ethics for teachers. See table on page 5-6 for evidence of endorsement components within the continuous assessment plan. 4

5 Table 1 CAP 1 Intent to Enter Teacher Education CAP 2 Admission to Teacher Education CAP 3 Admission to Student Teaching CAP 4 Completion/Exit from Teacher Education GPA: Cumulative 2.75 Professional: no grade lower than a C. Academic Competency: ACT-21 or PPST- 518 Total R (173) M (no minimum) W (no minimum) SAT-1470 BA or BS degree GPA: Cumulative 2.75 Major 2.75 Professional 2.75 Praxis II: KTS 1 Specialty & PLT & Endorsements Curriculum Guide sheet Curriculum Guide sheet Curriculum Guide sheet Written Communication: ENG 111 (C or above) ENG 112 (C or above) Impromptu Writing Evaluation Graduation Application GPA: Cumulative 2.75 Major 2.75 Professional 2.75 Praxis II: KTS 1 Specialty & PLT & Endorsements Curriculum Guide sheet Graduation Application TC 1 Completed Signed Disposition Assessment Policy Oral Communication: MAC 120/ 140 (C or above) Field/PPD Hours: 120 field; 30 PPD (Pre- Professional Development) or *150 field + 30 PPD for ESL endorsement Type & Diversity of Field Experiences Successful Student Teaching: All KTS Evaluations (KTS) by Cooperating Teachers Supervising Teachers Video & Analysis Dispositions Evaluations (3) Dispositions Evaluations (4) Dispositions Evaluations (3-4) Major Department/Area Recommendation Autobiography Pre-Professional Self Assessment/Growth Plan: KTS 9 Pre-Professional Self Assessment/Growth Plan: KTS 9 Pre-Professional Self Assessment/Growth Plan: KTS 9 5

6 KY Code of Ethics/IECE Confidentiality Statement & Ethical Use of Technology Required Checks: State Criminal Check/ KY Code of Ethics OR NAEYC Code of Ethical Conduct, CEC Code of Conduct and First Steps Provider Code of Ethical Conduct for IECE & Ethical Use of Technology KY Code of Ethics & Ethical Use of Technology Medical/Federal Criminal Check /TB test/liability Insurance KY Code of Ethics & Ethical Use of Technology ED 450 Seminars Clinical experiences: Type of field experience & Diversity TB wellness check CAN check for IECE Diversity Survey KTS/IECE CAP 3 Portfolio KTS or IECE/TS CAP 4 Portfolio CAP 2 Admission Interviews- SOE Faculty and representative from major CAP 4 Exit Interview: KTSNB certified teachers, administrators *Teacher education candidates pursuing an ESL endorsement will have 30 additional hours for a total of 150 field hours. For program evaluation, data from the CAPs will be entered into the School of Education database as CAPs occur. Annually, the unit will summarize and analyze data from the CAPs for review and analysis during annual School of Education retreats. In addition, the School of Education will also conduct surveys of program completers during periodic graduate surveys. IV. Description of Program Experiences The Campbellsville University TESL Endorsement program includes 5 courses (see below) with a total of 13 hours of coursework, and has a 30-hour field experience component built in. All courses in the endorsement program are online. These field experiences reflect a developmental progression, from simple observation/reporting to assisting a teacher and actual teaching. The English to Speakers of Other Languages portion of the Praxis II exam is required after the completion of all the endorsement coursework, after which the endorsement will be granted by the Commonwealth of Kentucky and attached to the teacher certification. COURSE # COURSE TITLE HRS TSL/ED 240 Language and Culture 2 TSL/ED 250 TESL Assessment and Testing 2 TSL/ED 340 L2 Acquisition and the Skill Set 3 TSL/ED 440 Applied Linguistics and English Grammar 3 TSL/ED 460 TESL Methods and Materials for P-12 Teaching 3 6

7 V. Integration of the Appropriate Kentucky Performance Standards: STANDARD 1: THE TEACHER DEMONSTRATES APPLIED CONTENT KNOWLEDGE The teacher demonstrates a current and sufficient academic knowledge of certified content areas to develop student knowledge and performance in those areas. Course Title Samples of Experience/Assessments TSL/ED 240 Language and Culture In-class discussion, homework, and research projects related to culture and its impact on second language learning TSL/ED 250 TESL Assessment and Testing In-class discussion and homework related to assessment topics; creation of authentic sample assessments TSL/ED 340 L2 Acquisition and the Skill Set In-class discussion and homework related to theory application; term papers focusing on various researchers in the field; semester project based around learning a second language and analyzing their personal learning process while applying applicable theory. TSL/ED 440 Applied Linguistics and English Grammar TSL/ED 460 TESL Methods and Materials for P-12 Teaching In-class discussion and homework; term project involving observations of language learners and application of linguistic theory; term papers related to linguistics and grammar in the ESOL classroom. In-class discussion and homework; creation of a portfolio containing sample lesson plans and reflections; observation hours related to tutoring and teaching where the student applies what is being learned in class. STANDARD 2: THE TEACHER DESIGNS AND PLANS INSTRUCTION The teacher designs/plans instruction that develops student abilities to use communication skills, apply core concepts, become self-sufficient individuals, become responsible team members, think and solve problems, and integrate knowledge. Course Title Course: Experience/Assessments TSL/ED 250 TESL Assessment and Testing Creation of authentic sample assessments aimed to accurately match the instruction given. TSL/ED 460 Methods and Materials for P-12 Teaching Creation of a portfolio which includes sample lesson plans and reflections upon their 30 hours of required observation/teaching experience. STANDARD 3: THE TEACHER CREATES AND MAINTAINS LEARNING CLIMATE The teacher creates a learning climate that supports the development of student abilities to use communication skills, apply core concepts, become self-sufficient individuals, become responsible team members, think and solve problems, and integrate knowledge. Course Title Samples of Experiences/Assessments TSL/ED 250 TESL Assessment and Testing In addition to creating authentic assessments for individual students, future 7

8 teachers also create assessments related to group activities. TSL/ED 460 Methods and Materials for P-12 Teaching In-class discussion related to classroom design, sustaining group work, and creating a positive learning environment for all students; evaluation of their ability to create and maintain the learning climate in portfolio reflections based on their 30 hours of observation work. STANDARD 4: THE TEACHER IMPLEMENTS AND MANAGES INSTRUCTION The teacher introduces/implements/manages instruction that develops student abilities to use communication skills, apply core concepts, become self-sufficient individuals, become responsible team members, think and solve problems, and integrate knowledge. Course Title Samples of Experiences/Assessments TSL/ED 250 TESL Assessment and Testing Creation of authentic sample assessments aimed to accurately match the instruction given. TSL/ED 460 Methods and Materials for P-12 Teaching Cap-stone portfolio reflections based on their 30 hours of observation work documenting their experience tutoring and teaching in an ESOL setting, analyzing what they have done and seen and then fine-tuning and making changes to their own teaching approaches where necessary. STANDARD 5: THE TEACHER ASSESSES AND COMMUNICATES LEARNING RESULTS The teacher assesses learning and communicates results to students and others with respect to student abilities to use communication skills, apply core concepts, become self-sufficient individuals, become responsible team members, think and solve problems, and integrate knowledge. Course Title Samples of Experience/Assessments TSL/ED 250 TESL Assessment and Testing Creation of assessments related to grammar, writing, speaking, listening, and reading with a focus upon creativity and authenticity. STANDARD 6: THE TEACHER DEMONSTRATES THE IMPLEMENTATION OF TECHNOLOGY The teacher uses technology to support instruction; access and manipulate data; enhance professional growth and productivity; communicate and collaborate with colleagues, parents, and the community; and conduct research. Course Title Sample Experiences/Assessments All courses All courses are taken on-line (using a learning management system); all courses involve research papers or projects which require library and internet research; future teachers are encourage to use technology in their presentations. STANDARD 7: REFLECTS ON AND EVALUATES TEACHING AND LEARNING The teacher reflects on and evaluates specific teaching/learning situations and/or programs. Course Title Sample Experiences/Assessments TSL/ED 460 Methods and Materials for P-12 Teaching Cap-stone portfolio reflections based on their 30 hours of observation work documenting their experience tutoring and teaching in an ESOL setting, analyzing 8

9 what they have done and seen and then fine-tuning and making changes to their own teaching approaches where necessary. STANDARD 8: COLLABORATES WITH COLLEAGUES/PARENTS/OTHERS The teacher collaborates with colleagues, parents, and other agencies to design, implement, and support learning programs that develop student abilities to use communication skills, apply core concepts, become self-sufficient individuals, become responsible team members, think and solve problems, and integrate knowledge. Course Title Sample Experiences/Assessments TSL/ED 250 TESL Assessment and Testing In addition to reading and discussions related to collaboration, future teachers complete one team project where they collaborate with their colleagues to create several assessments (a choice board). Field Experience In their observation hours or their participation in the cap-stone experience in Ukraine, students collaborate with one another and with the language learners that they are working with to meet desired goals. STANDARD 9: EVALUATES TEACHING AND IMPLEMENTS PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT The teacher evaluates his/her overall performance with respect to modeling and teaching Kentucky s learning goals, refines the skills and processes necessary, and implements a professional development plan. Course Title Sample Experiences/Assessments TSL/ED 460 Methods and Materials for P-12 Teaching Cap-stone portfolio reflections based on their 30 hours of observation work documenting their experience tutoring and teaching in an ESOL setting, analyzing what they have done and seen and then fine-tuning and making changes to their own teaching approaches where necessary. STANDARD 10: PROVIDES LEADERSHIP WITHIN SCHOOL/ COMMUNITY/ PROFESSION The teacher provides professional leadership within the school, community, and education profession to improve student learning and well-being. Course Title Sample Experiences/Assessments TSL/ED 460 Methods and Materials for P-12 Teaching Cap-stone portfolio reflections based on their 30 hours of observation work documenting their experience tutoring and teaching in an ESOL setting and helping students to learn. VI. Integration of Content Standards TESOL/NCATE STANDARDS FOR THE RECOGNITIONOF INITIAL TESOL PROGRAMS IN P 12 ESL TEACHER EDUCATION 9

10 Revision May 2010 Domain 1: Language Candidates know, understand, and use the major theories and research related to the structure and acquisition of language to support ESOL students language and literacy development and content area achievement. Standard 1.a. Language as a system Candidates demonstrate understanding of language as a system, including phonology, morphology, syntax and semantics, support ESOL students as they acquire English in order to communicate with native speakers of English. Rubric for Standard 1.a. Exceeds Standards assumes that the candidate has met the criteria under Meets Standards. Performance indicators provide examples of candidate performance, and are not intended to be prescriptive. Performance Indicator Meets Standard Exceeds Standard Evidence: Course Experiences and Assessments 1.a.1. Demonstrates knowledge of the components of language and language as an integrative system. Candidates can use the components of language and language as an integrative system to inform instruction with ESOL students. Candidates can use the components of language and language as an integrative system to create instructional plans for ESOL students. TSL/ED 340 Projects related to language learning and the analysis of this process to better understand the ESOL learner TSL/ED 440 Projects and research papers related to the stages of grammar acquisition and current topics and theories in linguistics and grammar instruction for the ESOL classroom. 1.a.2. Apply knowledge of phonology (the sound system), morphology (structure of words), syntax (phrase and sentence structure), semantics (word/sentence meaning), and pragmatics (effect of the context on language) to help ESOL students develop oral, reading, and writing (including spelling) skills in English. Candidates apply knowledge of developmental of phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and pragmatics to identify difficult aspects of English for their students, noting how ESOL students L1 and identity may affect their English learning. Candidates develop contextualized activities to assist ESOL students in recognizing, using, and acquiring the English sound system and communication skills, thus enhancing oral skills. Candidates teach syntactic structures that ESOL students need to communicate effectively for social and academic purposes. Candidates incorporate a variety of instructional techniques to assist ESOL students in developing literacy skills. Candidates design instructional activities to help ESOL students to understand and use vocabulary appropriately in spoken and written language. Candidates provide ESOL students with timely input and sufficient contextualized practice with idioms, cognates, and collocations. Candidates design contextualized instruction using formal an d informal Candidates help ESOL students develop strategies to monitor and develop proficiency in difficult aspects of English phonology. TSL/ED 440 Readings, homework assignments and class discussions on phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and pragmatics. 10

11 language to assist ESOL students in using and acquiring language for a variety of purposes. 1.a.3. Demonstrate knowledge of rhetorical and discourse structures as applied to ESOL learning. Candidates design contextualized activities that assist ESOL students in recognizing, using, acquiring, and practicing Roman script, spelling, punctuation, capitalization, and text organization in English. Candidates help ESOL students develop effective strategies to monitor their own use of English genres, discourse structures, and writing conventions. TSL/ED 250 & 460 Lesson planning and assessment creation related to writing conventions TSL/ED 440 Readings, homework assignments and class discussions related to discourse structures 1.a.4. Demonstrate proficiency in English and serve as a good language model for ESOL students. Candidates demonstrate proficiency in all aspects of English. Candidates serve as good English and home language models of ESOL students. TSL/ED 440 Readings, homework assignments and class discussions related to a review of grammar basics Standard 1.b. Language Acquisition and Development Candidates understand and apply theories and research of language acquisition and development to support their ESOL students learning. Rubric for Standard 1.b.Language Acquisition and Development These rubrics are additive. Exceeds Standards assumes that the candidate has met the criteria under Approaches Standard and Meets Standard. Performance Indicator Meets Standard Exceeds Standard Evidence: Course Experiences and Assessments 1.b.1. Demonstrate understanding of current and historical theories and research in language acquisition as applied to ESOL learners. 1.b.2. Candidates understand theories and research that explain how L1 literacy development differs from L2 literacy development. Candidates understand and apply their knowledge of L1 and L2 acquisition to ESOL learning. Candidates can explain theories and research that address how L1 literacy development differs from L2 literacy development. Candidates use their understanding of language acquisition theory and research to provide optimal learning environments for their ESOL learners and to conduct theory-based research in their own classrooms. Candidates use theories and research that explain how L1 literacy development differs from L2 literacy development to conduct their own classroom research. TSL/ED 340 Homework, readings and discussions related to SLA theory; projects related to language learning and the analysis of this process to better understand the ESOL learner TSL/ED 340 Homework, readings and discussions related to SLA theory; projects related to language learning and the analysis of this process to better understand the ESOL learner 1.b.3. Recognize the importance of ESOL students home languages and language varieties and build on these skills as a foundation for learning English. Candidates understand the importance of ESOL students home language and encourage families to use that language with their children at home. Whenever possible, candidates use the home language as a foundation and resource for learning English in the classroom through bilingual aides, families, and volunteer support. Candidates provide regular opportunities for ESOL students to read, learn, and express themselves in their home language in class. Candidates use the home language in the classroom to support literacy and content learning. TSL/ED 340 Homework, readings and discussions related to SLA theory and bilingualism TSL/ED 440 Summative and formative testing of knowledge of English conversational and interpersonal skills. TSL/ED 240 Homework, 11

12 1.b.4. Understand and apply knowledge of sociocultural, psychological and political variables to facilitate the process of learning English. Candidates understand the complex social, psychological and political nature of learning an L2 in school. Candidates investigate variables that affect language learning. Candidates apply knowledge of socio-cultural, psychological and political variables to inform instruction and improve communication with ESOL students and their families. readings, and research related to linguistic diversity in the ESOL classroom. TSL/ED 340 Homework, readings and discussions related to SLA theory; projects related to language learning and the analysis of this process to better understand the ESOL learner 1.b.5. Understand and apply knowledge of the role of individual learner variables in the process of learning English. Candidates know their ESOL students and understand that individual variables can have important effects on the process and level of L2 learning. Candidates apply this knowledge by setting high but reasonable expectations for individual students, varying instructional objectives and strategies, and monitoring student success. Candidates vary their teaching style to accommodate students different learning styles. Candidates use their understanding of learner variables to consistently provide individualized language- and contentlearning goals and appropriate instructional environments for ESOL learners. TSL/ED 240 Homework, readings, and research related to linguistic diversity in the ESOL classroom. TSL/ED 340 Lesson planning and microteaching of the skill set. TSL/ED 440 Summative and formative testing of knowledge of current theories and research. TSL/ED 250 & 460 Lesson planning and assessment creation related to student needs and proficiency level. Domain 2: Culture Standard 2 Culture as it Affects Student learning Candidates know, understand, and use in their instruction, major theories and research related to the nature and role of culture, and how cultural groups and individual cultural identities affect language learning and school achievement. Rubric for Standard 2 Culture as it Affects ESOL Learning Exceeds Standards assumes that the candidate has also met the criteria under Approaches Standard and Meets Standard. Performance Indicators Meets Standard Exceeds Standard Evidence: Course Experiences and Assessments 2.a. Understand and apply knowledge about cultural values and beliefs in the context of teaching and learning. 2.b. Understand and apply knowledge about the effects of racism, stereotyping, and discrimination to teaching and learning. Candidates teach using a variety of concepts about culture, including acculturation, assimilation, accommodation, biculturalism, the additive nature of culture, and the dynamics of prejudice, including stereotyping. Candidates consistently use and anti-bias curriculum and materials that promote an inclusive classroom climate, enhancing students skills and knowledge to interact with each other. Candidates consistently design and deliver instruction that incorporates students cultural values and beliefs. Candidates design and deliver instruction that includes anti-bias materials and develop a classroom climate that purposefully addresses bias, stereotyping and oppression. TSL/ED 240 Readings and class discussion on what is culture and its relationship to language TSL/ED 240 Readings and class discussion on diversity and similarities of language systems and world views Reflection of personal biases and cultural assumptions Reflection on personal beliefs and attitudes about languages, dialects, accents, 12

13 race, color, age, and any other line that is drawn to divide people 2.c. Understand and apply knowledge about cultural conflicts and home events that can have an impact on ESOL students learning. 2.d. Understand and apply knowledge about home/school communication to enhance ESL teaching and build partnerships with ESOL families. 2.e. Understand and apply concepts about the interrelationship between language and culture. 2.f. Use a range of resources, including the Internet, to learn about world cultures and specifically the cultures of students in their classrooms and apply that learning to instruction. 2.g. Understand and apply concepts of cultural competency, particularly knowledge about how an individual s cultural identity affects their learning and academic progress and how levels of cultural identity will vary widely among students. Candidates teach cross-cultural appreciation by addressing cross-cultural conflicts and establishing high expectations of ESOL students interactions across cultures. Candidates incorporate effective home/school communication techniques, including using the home language, as appropriate in their instruction. Candidates are able to communicate with and build partnerships with students families. Candidates choice of techniques and materials reflect their knowledge of the interdependence of language and culture. Candidates act as facilitators to help students transition be3tween the home culture and language and the U.S./school culture and language. Candidates use a range of resource about major cultural groups to deliver instruction. Candidates integrate different ways of learning and different cultural perspectives into their curriculum and instruction. Candidates plan and deliver instruction that values and adapts for students different cultural perspectives. Candidates design and deliver instruction that allows students to participate in cross-cultural studies and cross-cultural extracurricular opportunities. Candidates integrate conflict resolution into their instruction. Candidates communicate in a culturally respectful and linguistically appropriate manner with students families. Candidates establish ongoing partnerships with the community s adults and leaders by including them in curriculum and classroom activities. Candidates design and conduct classroom activities that encourage families to participate in their children s education. Candidates design classroom activities that enhance the connection between home and school culture and language. Candidates act as advocates to support students home culture and heritage language. Candidates consistently design activities that are based on their knowledge of cultural groups and incorporate them into their teaching. Candidates consistently design in-class activities and opportunities for students and families to share and apply their cultural perspectives to learning objectives. TSL/ED 240 Readings and class discussion on diversity and similarities of language systems and world views TSL/ED 240 Readings and class discussion on communicating high expectations and challenging students in positive and supportive ways TSL/ED 240 Readings and class discussion on what is culture and its relationship to language TSL/ED 240 Readings and class discussion on what is culture and its relationship to language; in-depth research projects related to cultural studies requiring library and internet research TSL/ED 240 Readings and class discussion on diversity and similarities of language systems and cultural world views Reflection of personal biases and cultural assumptions Reflection on personal beliefs and attitudes about languages, dialects, accents, 13

14 race, color, age, and any other line that is drawn to divide people Domain 3: Planning, Implementing, and Managing Instruction Candidates know, understand, and use evidence-based practices and strategies related to planning, implementing, and managing standards-based ESL and content instruction. Candidates are skilled in using a variety of classroom organization techniques, program models and teaching strategies for developing and integrating language skills. They can integrate technology and choose and adapt classroom resources. Standard 3.a. Planning for Standards-Based ESL and Content Instruction Candidates know, understand, and apply concepts, research, best practices, and evidenced-based strategies to plan classroom instruction in a supportive learning environment for ESOL students. Candidates plan for multilevel classrooms with learners from diverse backgrounds using standards-based ESL and content curriculum. Rubric for Standard 3.a. These rubrics are additive. Exceeds Standards assumes that the candidate has also met the criteria under Meets Standard. Performance Indicator Meets Standard Exceeds Standard Evidence: Course Experiences and Assessments 3.a.1 Plan standardsbased ESL and content instruction. Candidates plan standards-based ESL and content instruction. Candidates inform and work with their colleagues to plan standards-based instruction. TSL/ED 250 Readings, homework assignments and class discussions on ESL standards TSL/ED 460 Projects related to ESL standards and implementation of these in lesson plans. 3.a.2. Create supportive, accepting classroom environments. Candidates implement standards-based programs and instructional models appropriate to individual student needs. Candidates systematically plan ESL and content instruction that is student centered. Candidates plan lesson such that students work collaboratively to meet learning objectives. TSL/ED 340 Discussion of the affective factors which impact second language acquisition and the need for creating an ideal environment for learning TSL/ED 250 Readings, homework assignments and class discussions on ESL standards TSL/ED 460 Summative and formative testing of knowledge of ESL standards and implementation of these in lesson plans; in-class discussions related to classroom environment and management. 3.a.3. Plan differentiated learning experiences based on assessment of students English and Candidates plan activities at the appropriate language levels, integrating students cultural backgrounds and learning styles. Candidates plan multilevel activities and are flexible in grouping students to meet instructional needs of TSL/ED 250 Discussion of the use of placement and assessment testing to determine proficiency level 14

15 first language proficiency, learning styles and prior formal educational experiences and knowledge. Candidates use students prior knowledge in planning ESL and content instruction. linguistically and culturally diverse student populations. TSL/ED 460 Projects involving ESL proficiency levels rubrics and implementation of them in lesson plans 3.a.4. Provide for particular needs of students with limited formal schooling (LFS). 3.a.5. Plan for instruction that embeds assessment, includes scaffolding and provides re-teaching when necessary for individuals and small groups to successfully meet learning objectives. Candidates plan learning tasks specific to the needs of LFS students. Candidates plan ESL and content instruction to meet reading and writing needs of LFS students. Candidates plan assessment of LFS students competence with text. Candidates plan lesson which scaffold and link students prior knowledge to newly-introduced learning objectives. Candidates continually monitor students progress toward learning objectives with formal and informal assessments. Following formal and informal assessments, candidates re-teach, using alternate materials, techniques and assessments for students who need additional time and approaches to master learning objectives. Candidates plan ways to motivate and guide LFS students to successful academic experiences. Candidates plan visually supportive, text-rich environments using appropriate materials that include students personal and shared experiences, language and culture. Candidates assist colleagues by sharing additional techniques, and assessments to meet individual students learning needs. Candidates connect ESOL students with additional supports for learning, such as after-school tutoring, homework clubs, or homework buddies. TSL/ED 440 Summative and formative testing of knowledge of current theories and research TSL/ED 460 Creation of a resource list for teaching and learning English Readings and class discussions and reflection on theories, research, and literacy TSL/ED 250 Homework and in-class discussions about matching assessment, student needs, and actual instruction. TSL/ED 460 Lesson planning creation Standard 3.b. Managing and Implementing Standards-Based ESL and Content Instruction Candidates know, manage, and implement a variety of standards-based strategies and techniques for developing and integrating English listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Candidates support ESOL students access to the core curriculum by teaching language through academic content. Rubric for Standard 3.b. These rubrics are additive. Exceeds Standards assumes that the candidate has also met the criteria under Meets Standard. Performance Indicator Meets Standard Exceeds Standard Evidence: Course Experiences and Assessments 3.b.1. Organize learning around standards-based subject matter and language learning objectives. Candidates provide standards-based ESL and content instruction from relevant national, state, and local frameworks. Candidates aid their colleagues in teaching from a stands-based perspective that meets national, state, and local objectives TSL/ED 460 Summative and formative testing of knowledge of ESL proficiency levels rubrics and implementation of them in lesson plans 3.b.2. Incorporate activities, tasks, and assignments that develop authentic uses of language, as students learn academic vocabulary and contentarea material. Candidates design and implement activities, tasks, and assignments that develop authentic uses of academic language as students access content-area learning objectives. Candidates collaborate with non-esl classroom teachers to develop authentic uses of academic language and activities in content areas. TSL/ED 440 Summative and formative testing of knowledge of ESL standards TSL/ED 460 Summative and formative testing of knowledge of ESL standards and implementation of these in lesson plans; in-class 15

16 discussions related to use of authentic teaching materials 3.b.3. Provide activities and materials that integrate listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Candidates provide integrated learning activities using authentic sources that build meaning through practice. Candidates model activities to demonstrate way students ay integrate skills (e.g., language and/ or content). Candidates design activities that integrate skill and content areas through thematic and inquiry-based units. TSL/ED 250 TSL/ED 250 Readings, homework assignments and class discussions on ESL standards TSL/ED 340 Lesson planning and micro-teaching of the skill set TSL/ED 460 Summative and formative testing of knowledge of ESL standards and implementation of these in lesson plans; in-class discussions related to use of authentic teaching materials related to the needed skill set 3.b.4. Develop students listening skills for a variety of academic and social purposes. 3.b.5. Develop students speaking skills for a variety of academic and social purposes. Candidates provide a variety of activities and settings to assist students in making use of what they know in order to listen effectively. Candidates provide opportunities for students to practice a variety of speech registers linked to academic and social activities. Candidates provide practice and assist students in learning to assess their own listening skulls in a variety of contexts. Candidates help students develop and use listening strategies. Candidates collaborate with non-esl classroom teachers to select listening goals for content areas. Candidates adapt activities to assist ESOL students social and academic speaking skills. Candidates collaborate with non-esl classroom teachers to select speaking goals for content areas. TSL/ED 460 Summative and formative testing of knowledge of ESL standards and implementation of these in lesson plans; in-class discussions related to use of authentic teaching materials related to the needed skill set TSL/ED 440 Summative and formative testing of knowledge teaching approaches for teaching speaking/conversation Readings, homework assignments and class discussions on teaching speaking/conversation TSL/ED 460 Summative and formative testing of knowledge of ESL methods and approaches and implementation of them in teaching speaking/conversation lesson plans; lesson planning and micro-teaching of a speaking/conversation lesson 3.b.6. Provide standards- Candidates provide standards-based Candidates develop a variety TSL/ED 440 Summative 16

17 based instruction that builds upon students oral English to support learning to read and write. instruction that builds and integrates learners reading and writing as their oral language develops. of ways to integrate learners reading and writing as their oral language develops. and formative testing of knowledge teaching approaches for teaching reading and writing TSL/ED 460 Summative and formative testing of knowledge of ESL methods and approaches and implementation of them in teaching reading and writing lesson plans 3.b.7. Provide standardsbased reading instruction adapted to ESOL learners. Candidates design reading instruction that includes various cueing systems appropriate for ESOL learners. Candidates design and model standards-based reading activities using different genres for students at different proficiency levels and developmental stages, including students with limited literacy in their home languages. Candidates use a variety of texts, including literature and other content materials, to support and aid ESOL students reading development. Candidates explain and model explicit reading strategies that assist students with standards-based texts from contentarea course work. Candidates engage ESOL students who are having difficulty developing their English reading skills. Candidates develop lessons around texts in a variety of genres related to students studies in content-area classes. Candidates collaborate with non-esl classroom teachers to select reading goals for content areas. TSL/ED 440 Summative and formative testing of knowledge teaching approaches for teaching reading and writing Readings, homework assignments and class discussions on teaching reading and writing TSL/ED 460 Summative and formative testing of knowledge of ESL methods and approaches and implementation of them in teaching reading and writing lesson plans 3.b.8. Provide standardsbased writing instruction adapted to ESOL learners. Develop students writing through a range of activities, from sentence formation to expository writing. Candidates design and model standards-based writing activities using different genres (e.g., narrative, expository, argumentative) for students at different proficiency levels and developmental stages, including students with limited literacy in their home languages. Candidates, when appropriate, instruct students regarding contrasts between English and the writing systems of their home language. Candidates provide opportunities for written assignments that are ungraded, including interactive journals. Candidates provide instruction in a variety of writing development models, including the writing process, which promote high expectations and personal value for writing. Candidates collaborate with non-esl classroom teachers to select writing goals and activities in content areas. TSL/ED 440 Summative and formative testing of knowledge teaching approaches for teaching reading and writing Readings, homework assignments and class discussions on teaching reading and writing TSL/ED 460 Summative and formative testing of knowledge of ESL methods and approaches and implementation of them in teaching reading and writing lesson plans Standard 3.c. Using Resources and Technology Effectively in ESL and Content Instructions Candidates are familiar with a wide range of standards-based materials, resources, and technologies, and choose, adapt, and use them in effective ESL and content teaching. 17

18 Rubric for Standard 3.c. Using Resources Effectively in ESL Instruction These rubrics are additive. Exceeds Standards assumes that candidate has also met the criteria under Meets Standard. Performance Indicator Meets Standard Exceeds Standard Evidence: Course Experiences and Assessments 3.c.1. Select, adapt, and use culturally responsive, age-appropriate, and linguistically accessible materials. Candidates select and adapt print and visual materials that are appropriate for students age, learning style and language proficiency. Candidates build on students culture in selecting, adapting, and sequencing ESL and content-area materials. Candidates use students community and family to locate and develop culturally appropriate materials. TSL/ED 240 Class discussions and homework related to culture and its influence in the classroom. TSL/ED 440 Summative and formative testing of knowledge of ESL standards TSL/ED 460 Summative and formative testing of knowledge of ESL standards and implementation of them in lesson plans. 3.c.2. Select materials and other resources that are appropriate to students developing language and contentarea abilities, including appropriate use of L1. Candidates incorporate a variety of resources at multiple proficiency levels, including selections from or adaptations of materials from content-area texts. Candidates use materials in students L1 as appropriate. Candidates collaborate with non-esl classroom teachers to develop materials and resources that integrate ESL and content areas. TSL/ED 440 Summative and formative testing of knowledge of ESL standards. Readings, homework assignments and class discussions on teaching content-based ESL. TSL/ED 460 Summative and formative testing of knowledge of methods and materials for teaching content-based ESL. 3.c.3. Employs a variety of materials for language learning, including books, visual aids, props, and realia. 3.c.4. Use technological resources (e.g., Web, software, computers, and related devices) to enhance language and content-area instruction for ESOL students. Candidates find and/or create instructional materials in English and the home language for student instruction and use. Candidates enable students to use a variety of learning tools, including hands-on, visual, and multimedia means of instruction. Candidates use technological resources to enhance, create, and/or adapt instruction to meet ESOL students language and content learning needs. Candidates assist students in learning how to evaluate and use technological resources for their own academic purposes. Candidates assist students in learning how to evaluate and use technological resources for their own academic purposes. TSL/ED 440 Readings, homework assignments and class discussions on teaching the ESL skill set TSL/ED 460 Summative and formative testing of knowledge of how to use technology and authentic materials in ESL teaching. TSL/ED 460 Summative and formative testing of knowledge of how to use technology and authentic materials in ESL teaching. Domain 4: Assessment Candidates understand issues and concepts of formative and summative assessment and use standards-based procedures with ESOL students. Standard 4.a. Issues of Assessment for English Language Learners. Rubric for Standard 4.a. Issues of Assessment for ESL These rubrics are additive. Exceeds Standards assumes that the candidate has also met the criteria under Meets Standard. Performance Indicator Meets Standard Exceeds Standard Evidence: Course Experiences and 18

19 4.a.1. Demonstrate an understanding of the purposes of assessment as they relate to ESOL learners and use results appropriately. 4.a.2. Knowledgeable about an able to use a variety of assessment procedures for ESOL students. 4.a.3. Demonstrate an understanding of the advantages and limitations of assessments, including accommodations for ESOL students. 4.a.4. Demonstrate understanding of the advantages and limitations of assessments, including accommodations for ESOL students. 4.a.5. Distinguish among ESOL students language differences, giftedness and special education needs. Candidates understand and can identify/explain the different purposes for assessment. Candidates prepare their students appropriately for the type of assessment being used, including technology-based assessment. Candidates use multiple and appropriate formative and summative assessment measures for a variety of purposes, including classroom and student self-assessment and technologybased assessment (e.g., audio, video, computer). Candidates understand that procedures intended for native English speakers may not apply to English learners. Candidates can explain why tests are valid and/or reliable, and use this knowledge in making assessmentrelated decisions. Candidates understand obstacles English learners commonly face and enabling them to do their best in such situations. Candidates know state allowed test accommodations for English Learners and apply them when necessary or required. Candidates work with a variety of resources, including native-language assessment and knowledgeable colleagues, to distinguish among language differences, giftedness, and a learning disability for ESOL students. Candidates understand appropriate diagnostic processes and are able to document ESOL student growth and performance required before considering referral or special education assessment. Candidates share their knowledge and experience about the purposes of assessment with colleagues and parents. Candidates design and adapt classroom tests and alternative assessment measures to make them appropriate for ESOL learners for a variety of purposes. Candidates can create assessment measures that are standards based, valid, and reliable, as appropriate. Candidates evaluate formal and informal assessment measures for psychological, cultural, and linguistic limitations. Candidates work collaboratively with assessment personnel to assess ESOL students who are gifted and talented and/or have special learning needs. Candidates share with colleagues their knowledge and experience about gifted and talented and special learning needs of ESOL students. Assessments TSL/ED 250 Classroom discussion, homework and projects related to assessment TSL/ED 460 Summative and formative testing of knowledge of how to create ESL materials customtailored to individual needs. TSL/ED 250 Classroom discussion, homework and projects related to assessment TSL/ED 440 Readings, homework assignments and class discussions on teachermade and commercial materials/assessments. TSL/ED 460 Summative and formative testing of knowledge of how to create ESL assessments customtailored to individual needs. Resource list of commercial materials available and for what level of English proficiency they are appropriate. TSL/ED 250 Classroom discussion, homework and projects related to assessment TSL/ED 460 Summative and formative testing of knowledge of how to create ESL materials customtailored to individual needs. TSL/ED 250 Classroom discussion, homework and projects related to matching assessment with student needs TSL/ED 250 Classroom discussion, homework and projects related to matching assessment with student needs TSL/ED 460 Creation of a list of resources for teaching ESL including Internet sites and software 19

20 Standard 4.b. Language Proficiency Assessment Candidates can use and interpret a variety of standards-based language proficiency instruments, usually norm-referenced, to meet district, state and federal guidelines, and to inform their instruction. They also understand their uses for identification, placement, and demonstration of language growth of English learners. Rubric for 4.a. Language Proficiency Assessment These rubrics are additive. Exceeds Standards assumes that the candidate has also met the criteria under Meets Standard. Performance Indicator Meets Standard Exceeds Standard Evidence: Course Experiences and Assessments 4.b.1. Understand and implement national and state requirements for identification, reclassification, and exit of ESOL students from language support programs. 4.b.2. Understand the appropriate use of normreferenced assessments with ESOL learners. 4.b.3. Assess ESOL learners language skills and communicative competence using multiple sources of information. Candidates make informed decisions regarding placement and reclassification of students in ESOL programs based on national and state requirements. Candidates involve families in program decisions for ESOL students. Candidates understand the nature of norm-referenced assessments, including their strengths and weaknesses, and use this information to make decision s about ESOL students (e.g., identification, placement, achievement, reclassification, and possible giftedness and/or learning disabilities. Candidates assess ESOL learners discrete and integrated ability to use grammar, vocabulary, listening, speaking, reading, and writing to communicate appropriately using performance-based measures. Candidates share their knowledge and expertise regarding identification, placement, reclassification, and exiting of ESIK students with their colleagues. Candidates share this knowledge with their colleagues. Candidates create multiple performance-based measures to assess students language skills and communicative competence across the curriculum. Candidates share these measures with their colleagues. TSL/ED 250 Readings and class discussion of national and state requirements TSL/ED 250 Use of computer-based placement and assessment testing. TSL/ED 250 Use of computer-based placement and assessment testing. Summative and formative testing of knowledge of ESL proficiency levels rubrics and implementation of them in sample tests. Write sample tests for each area of the skill set using different testing techniques. Standard 4.c. Classroom-Based Assessment for ESL Candidates know, and can use a variety of standards-based, on-going, formative and summative, performance-based assessment tools and techniques to inform instruction in the classroom. Rubric for Standard 4.c. Classroom-Based Assessment for ESL These rubrics are additive. Exceeds Standards assumes that the candidate has also met the criteria under Meets Standard. Performance indicators provide examples of candidate performance, and are not intended to be prescriptive. Performance Indicator Meets Standard Exceeds Standard Evidence: Course Experiences and Assessments 4.c.1. Use performancebased assessment tools and tasks that measure ESOL learners progress. Candidates use a variety of performance-based assessment tools (e.g., portfolios, classroom observation checklists, reading logs, video, spreadsheet software) that measure ESOL students progress. Candidates design performance-based tasks and tools to measure ESOL learners progress. TSL/ED 250 Use of computer-based placement and assessment testing. Summative and formative testing of knowledge of ESL proficiency levels rubrics and implementation of them in sample tests. Write sample tests for each area of the skill set using different testing techniques. 4.c.2. Understand and Candidates use authentic and Candidates construct and TSL/ED

21 use criterion-referenced assessments appropriately with ESOL learners. 4.c.3. Use various instruments and techniques to assess content-area learning (e.g., math, science, social studies) for ESOL learners at varying levels of language and literacy development. 4.c.4. Prepare ESOL students and use self-and peer-assessment techniques when appropriate. 4.c.5. Use a variety of rubrics to assess ESOL students language development in classroom settings. traditional criterion- referenced procedures to assess ESOL students language and content-area learning. Candidates appropriately use these assessments to help determine possible special needs (e.g., giftedness and/or learning disabilities). Candidates use a variety of instruments and techniques, including technologybased assessment, to assess ESOL learners knowledge in the content areas at varying levels of English language and literacy ability. Candidates use test adaptation techniques, (e.g., simplifying the language of assessment measures and directions). Candidates model self- and peerassessment techniques and provide opportunities for students to practice these in the classroom. Candidates use a variety of rubrics to assess ESOL students language development. evaluate a range of criterionreferenced measures and item types to assess ESOL students learning. Candidates share this knowledge with their colleagues. Candidates develop and adapt a variety of techniques and instruments when appropriate to assess ESOL students content learning at all levels of language proficiency and literacy. Candidates embed self- and peer-assessment techniques in their instruction and model them across the curriculum. Candidates share self-and peer-assessment techniques with their colleagues. Candidates develop and adapt a variety of rubrics to assess ESOL students language development. Summative and formative testing of knowledge of ESL proficiency levels rubrics and implementation of them in sample tests. Write sample tests for each area of the skill set using different testing techniques. TSL/ED 250 Write sample tests for each area of the skill set using different testing techniques TSL/ED 250 Use of computer-based placement and assessment testing. Summative and formative testing of knowledge of ESL proficiency levels rubrics and implementation of them in sample tests. TSL/ED 250 Creation of rubrics based on content instruction for ESOL needs Domain 5: Professionalism Candidates keep current with new instructional techniques, research results, advances in the ESL field, and public policy issues. Candidates demonstrate knowledge of the history of ESL teaching. Candidates use such information to reflect upon and improve their instructional and assessment practices. Candidates work collaboratively with school staff and the community to improve the learning environment, provide support, and advocate for ESOL students and their families. Standard 5.a. ESL Research and History Rubric for Standard 5.a. ESL Research and History These rubrics are additive. Exceeds Standards assumes that the candidate has also met the criteria under Meets Standard. Performance Indicator Meets Standard Exceeds Standard Evidence: Course Experiences and Assessments 5.a.1. Demonstrate knowledge of language teaching methods in their historical contexts. Candidates use their knowledge of the evolution and research in the field of ESL to design effective instruction, and can articulate their personal educational philosophy in this area. Candidates use their knowledge of the evolution of the field of ESL to make instructional and assessment decisions and conduct their own classroom-based research. TSL/ED 340 Readings, homework assignments and class discussions on L2 acquisition theory and its progression over the years. Summative and formative testing of knowledge of L2 acquisition and the skill sets. TSL/ED 440 Readings, homework assignments and class discussions on Applied Linguistics and Grammar. 21

22 TSL/ED 460 Readings, homework assignments and class discussions on methods of teaching ESL and materials usage including the changes in methods over the years. Development of a teaching ESL professional portfolio. 5.a.2. Demonstrate knowledge of the evolution of laws and policy in the ESL profession. 5.a.3. Demonstrate ability to read and conduct classroom research. Candidates use their knowledge of the laws, judicial decisions, policies, and guidelines that have influenced the ESL profession to design appropriate instruction for students. Candidates are able to conduct classroom research. Candidates participate in discussions with colleagues and the public concerning federal, state, and local guidelines, laws, and policies which impact ESOL students. Candidates design and implement classroom research which will impact their instruction. TSL/ED 250 Readings and class discussion of national and state requirements TSL/ED 240, 250, 340, 440, & 460 Research papers and projects are a part of the overall assessment in each course. Standard 5.b. Professional Development, Partnerships, and Advocacy Candidates take advantage of professional growth opportunities and demonstrate the ability to build partnerships with colleagues and students families, serve as community resources, and advocate for ESOL students. Rubric for Standard 5.b. Professional Development, Partnerships, and Advocacy These rubrics are additive. Exceeds Standard assumes that the candidate has also met the criteria under Meets Standard. Performance Indicator Meets Standard Exceeds Standard Evidence: Course Experiences and Assessments 5.b.1. Participate in professional growth opportunities. 5.b.2. Establish professional goals and pursue opportunities to grow in the field of ESL. Candidates participate in local professional growth opportunities. Candidates participate in ESOL organizations. Candidates implement a personal professional development plan based on interests and reflection, taking advantage of opportunities in professional associations and other academic organizations. Candidates assist others professional growth by sharing their expertise and mentoring others. Candidates engage in a continuous cycle of ESL professional development that is informed by their instructional reflections and analysis. Candidates take active roles in their professional associations. TSL/ED 460 Site-based classroom observation. Readings, homework assignments and class discussions on methods of teaching ESL and materials usage. Development of a teaching ESL professional portfolio. TSL/ED 250 Peer work/group projects in the creation of assessments for use in the classroom. TSL/ED 340 Creation of a resource list for teaching and learning English with a focus on L2 acquisition and the skill sets. TSL/ED 440 Readings, homework assignments and class discussions on Applied Linguistics and Grammar. Summative and formative testing of knowledge of L2 acquisition and the skill sets. Creation of a resource list for teaching and learning English with a focus on Applied Linguistics and Grammar. 22

23 5.b.3. Work with other teachers and staff to provide comprehensive, challenging educational opportunities for ESOL students in the school. Candidates collaborate with general and specialist school staff (e.g., multidisciplinary faculty teams) to establish an instructional program appropriate for ESOL students at a variety of English proficiency levels. Candidates provide leadership to staff in establishing appropriate instructional opportunities for ESOL students. TSL/ED 460 Site-based classroom observation. Readings, homework assignments and class discussions on methods of teaching ESL and materials usage. Development of a teaching ESL professional portfolio. TSL/ED 240 Readings and class discussion on language and culture. Summative and formative testing of knowledge of language and culture. Creation of a resource list for teaching and learning English. 5.b.4. Engage in collaborative teaching in general education, content-area, special education, and gifted classrooms. 5.b.5. Advocate for ESOL students access to academic classes, resources, and instructional technology. Candidates teach collaboratively with other teachers to assist ESOL students in general education, content-area, special education, and gifted classrooms. Candidates advocate for ESOL students and their families when necessary as students work through school programs. Candidates share with colleagues the importance of ESOL students equal access to educational resources, including technology. Candidates take part on instructional teams advocating for appropriate instructional services for ESOL students who may have special needs and/or giftedness. Candidates share greater responsibility for effective instruction and student success in content-area classes. Candidates serve as advocates and ESOL resources to support ESOL students and their families as they make decisions in the schools and community. Candidates assist colleagues to appropriately select, adapt, and customize resources for use by ESO students. TSL/ED 240 Readings and class discussion on language and culture. Summative and formative testing of knowledge of language and culture. TSL/ED 240 Readings, homework assignments and class discussions on diversity in the classrooms and the relationship to language to culture. Summative and formative testing of knowledge of language and culture. TSL/ED Readings, homework assignments and class discussions on L2 acquisition and the skill sets. Summative and formative testing of knowledge of L2 acquisition and the skill sets. 5.b.6. Support ESOL families. Candidates provide ESOL students and their families with information, support, and assistance as they advocate together for the students and their families. Candidates assist families to participate fully in their school and community. Candidates engage with community members and policy makers with respect to issues affecting ESOL students. Candidates create the circumstances and environment that support ESOL student and family empowerment. TSL/ED 440 Readings, homework assignments and class discussions on Applied Linguistics and Grammar. Summative and formative testing of knowledge of L2 acquisition and the skill sets. TSL/ED 240 Readings, homework assignments and class discussions on diversity in the classrooms and the relationship to language to culture. Summative and formative testing of knowledge of language and culture. TSL/ED 340 Readings, homework assignments and class discussions on L2 acquisition and the skill sets. Summative and formative testing of knowledge of L2 23

24 acquisition and the skill sets. TSL/ED 440 Readings, homework assignments and class discussions on Applied Linguistics and Grammar. Summative and formative testing of knowledge of L2 acquisition and the skill sets. 5.b.7. Serve as professional resource personnel in their educational communities. Candidates model for their colleagues a variety of techniques and attitudes needed to work effectively with ESOL students. Candidates keep current with media reports about the education of ESOL students. Candidates help other teachers and school administrators work effectively with ESOL students. Candidates provide instruction and professional growth activities for colleagues, sharing skills for working with ESOL students. Candidates assist policy makers to understand the curricula and instructional approaches that best meet the needs of ESOK students in their community. TSL/ED 240 Readings, homework assignments and class discussions on diversity in the classrooms and the relationship to language to culture. Case study of an ESL classroom. Summative and formative testing of knowledge of language and culture. TSL/ED 340 Readings, homework assignments and class discussions on L2 acquisition and the skill sets. Summative and formative testing of knowledge of L2 acquisition and the skill sets. TSL/ED 440 Readings, homework assignments and class discussions on Applied Linguistics and Grammar. Summative and formative testing of knowledge of L2 acquisition and the skill sets. VII. KY P-12 Curricular Documents: Courses Program of Studies Grades P-12/KY Core Academic Standards (KCAS) (In transition to all core academic standards) Core Content for Assessment (To be replaced with new Assessment when available) Program of Studies Core Content/ Kentucky Core Academic Standards (KCAS) TSL/ED 240 Introduction to all Core Content SS-E SS-E SS-E SS-M SS-M SS-H SS-H KCAS CC.6-8.W.1a-e CC.6-8.W.2a-f CC.6-8.W.4-10 CC.9-10.W.1.c-e CC.9-10.W.2a-f Examples of Course/Field Experiences Use reference materials Make sense of professional reading materials Make sense of observations in field experiences Make sense of things they hear in field experiences Communicate ideas & information Make presentations to peers Use computers & other technology to enhance instruction Interact with diverse ethnic & cultural groups Recognize continuity & change to make decisions Analyze & interpret human behaviors Be adaptable & flexible Make decisions based on ethical values Use productive team membership skills Be sensitive to multicultural ideas Demonstrate open mind to alternative perspectives 24

25 CC.9-10.W.4-5 CC.9-10.W.7-10 CC W.1-1a CC W.1.c-e CC W.2.a-c CC W.2.e CC W.4-10 TSL/ED 250 All applicable KCAS CC.6-8.W.1a-e CC.6-8.W.2a-f CC.6-8.W.4-10 CC.9-10.W.1.c-e CC.9-10.W.2a-f CC.9-10.W.4-5 CC.9-10.W.7-10 CC W.1-1a CC W.1.c-e CC W.2.a-c CC W.2.e CC W.4-10 Use critical thinking skills Use problem-solving processes Address situations from multiple perspectives Use knowledge base to gain new knowledge Expand knowledge by making connections Students write one term paper and also often complete one semester project requiring written arguments and explanations related to TESL content. Students engage in class discussions and homework assignments related to critically evaluating topics related to TESL content. Students write a term paper for each course or complete a semester project requiring research and the adequate presentation of that research. Students engaged in class discussions and homework assignments where they are asked to clearly present their findings, understanding of topics, and opinions. Students write one term paper and also often complete one semester project requiring written arguments and explanations related to TESL content using a formal academic style. Students write one term paper and also often complete one semester project requiring a conclusion that synthesizes the information discussed. Students write a term paper related to important theories and theorists in the field of TESL. Students write term papers, complete semester projects and make presentations based on these activities, all requiring clear introductions. Students write a term paper for each course or complete a semester project requiring research supporting their topic. Students write a term paper for each course and complete a semester project requiring research supporting their topic. Students write a term paper for each course and complete semester projects requiring the explanation and clarification of ideas related to TESL. Students engage in class discussions and written homework assignments where the use of TESL terminology is needed. Students write one term paper and also often complete one semester project requiring written arguments and explanations related to TESL content using a formal, objective, and academic style. Students use the internet to post homework assignments in blog/discussion forums. Students peer review and provide feedback to fellow students concerning the term papers that they are writing. Students write a term paper for each course or complete a semester project requiring research through the library databases and the internet and careful paraphrasing and citing of the information found. Students are continually writing throughout the semester, from daily reflections and journaling to term papers. Write assessment and testing materials Use reference materials Make sense of professional reading materials Make sense of observations in field experiences Make sense of things they hear in field experiences Communicate ideas & information Make presentations to peers Use computers & other technology to enhance instruction Interact with diverse ethnic & cultural groups Recognize continuity & change to make decisions Analyze & interpret human behaviors Be adaptable & flexible Make decisions based on ethical values Use productive team membership skills Be sensitive to multicultural ideas Demonstrate open mind to alternative perspectives Use critical thinking skills Use problem-solving processes Address situations from multiple perspectives Use knowledge base to gain new knowledge E Students write one term paper and also often complete one semester project requiring written arguments and explanations related to TESL content. Students engage in class discussions and homework assignments related to critically evaluating topics related to TESL content. Students write a term paper for each course or complete a semester project requiring research and the adequate presentation of that research. 25

26 Students engaged in class discussions and homework assignments where they are asked to clearly present their findings, understanding of topics, and opinions. Students write one term paper and also often complete one semester project requiring written arguments and explanations related to TESL content using a formal academic style. Students write one term paper and also often complete one semester project requiring a conclusion that synthesizes the information discussed. Students write a term paper related to important theories and theorists in the field of TESL. Students write term papers, complete semester projects and make presentations based on these activities, all requiring clear introductions. Students write a term paper for each course or complete a semester project requiring research supporting their topic. Students write a term paper for each course and complete a semester project requiring research supporting their topic. Students write a term paper for each course and complete semester projects requiring the explanation and clarification of ideas related to TESL. Students engage in class discussions and written homework assignments where the use of TESL terminology is needed. Students write one term paper and also often complete one semester project requiring written arguments and explanations related to TESL content using a formal, objective, and academic style. Students use the internet to post homework assignments in blog/discussion forums. Students peer review and provide feedback to fellow students concerning the term papers that they are writing. Students write a term paper for each course or complete a semester project requiring research through the library databases and the internet and careful paraphrasing and citing of the information found. Students are continually writing throughout the semester, from daily reflections and journaling to term papers. Expand knowledge by making connections TSL/ED 340 Introduction to all Core Content All Reading and Writing Applicable KCAS CC.6-8.W.1a-e CC.6-8.W.2 CC.6-8.W.2a-f CC.6-8.W.4-10 CC.9-10.W.1.a-e CC.9-10.W.2 CC.9-10.W.2a-f CC.9-10.W.4-5 CC.9-10.W.7-10 CC W.1.a-e CC W.2 CC W.2.a-e CC W.4-10 Use reference materials Make sense of professional reading materials Make sense of observations in field experiences Make sense of things they hear in field experiences Communicate ideas & information Make presentations to peers Use computers & other technology to enhance instruction Interact with diverse ethnic & cultural groups Recognize continuity & change to make decisions Analyze & interpret human behaviors Be adaptable & flexible Make decisions based on ethical values Use productive team membership skills Be sensitive to multicultural ideas Demonstrate open mind to alternative perspectives Use critical thinking skills Use problem-solving processes Address situations from multiple perspectives Use knowledge base to gain new knowledge Expand knowledge by making connections Students write one term paper and also often complete one semester project requiring written arguments and explanations related to TESL content. Students engage in class discussions and homework assignments related to critically evaluating topics related to TESL content. Students write a term paper for each course or complete a semester project requiring research and the adequate presentation of that research. Students engaged in class discussions and homework assignments where they are asked to clearly present their findings, understanding of topics, and opinions. Students write one term paper and also often complete one semester project requiring written arguments and explanations related to TESL content using a formal academic style. Students write one term paper and also often complete one semester project requiring a conclusion that synthesizes the information discussed. Students write a term paper related to important theories and theorists in the field of TESL. 26

27 Students write term papers, complete semester projects and make presentations based on these activities, all requiring clear introductions. Students write a term paper for each course or complete a semester project requiring research supporting their topic. Students write a term paper for each course and complete a semester project requiring research supporting their topic. Students write a term paper for each course and complete semester projects requiring the explanation and clarification of ideas related to TESL. Students engage in class discussions and written homework assignments where the use of TESL terminology is needed. Students write one term paper and also often complete one semester project requiring written arguments and explanations related to TESL content using a formal, objective, and academic style. Students use the internet to post homework assignments in blog/discussion forums. Students peer review and provide feedback to fellow students concerning the term papers that they are writing. Students write a term paper for each course or complete a semester project requiring research through the library databases and the internet and careful paraphrasing and citing of the information found. Students are continually writing throughout the semester, from daily reflections and journaling to term papers. Students write a term paper related to important theories and theorists in the field of TESL. Students engage in class discussions regarding the arguments and counterarguments for certain theories related to second language acquisition. Students write a research paper related to one particular specialist or theory. TSL/ED 440 ELA-P-W-1 thru 29 ELA-4-W-1 thru 6 ELA-5-W-1 thru 6 ELA-6-W-1 thru 5 ELA-7-W-1 thru 7 ELA-8-W-1 thru 8 ELA-EI-W- 1 thru 7 ELA-EII- W-1 thru 7 ELA- EIII-W-1 thru 6 ELA-EIV-V-1 thru 7 Core Content All Writing Applicable KCAS CC.6-8.W.1a-e CC.6-8.W.2a-f CC.6-8.W.4-10 CC.9-10.W.1.c-e CC.9-10.W.2a-f CC.9-10.W.4-5 CC.9-10.W.7-10 CC W.1-1a CC W.1.c-e CC W.2.a-c CC W.2.e CC W.4-10 Use reference materials Make sense of professional reading materials Make sense of observations in field experiences Make sense of things they hear in field experiences Communicate ideas & information Make presentations to peers Use computers & other technology to enhance instruction Interact with diverse ethnic & cultural groups Recognize continuity & change to make decisions Analyze & interpret human behaviors Be adaptable & flexible Make decisions based on ethical values Use productive team membership skills Be sensitive to multicultural ideas Demonstrate open mind to alternative perspectives Use critical thinking skills Use problem-solving processes Address situations from multiple perspectives Use knowledge base to gain new knowledge Expand knowledge by making connections Students write one term paper and also often complete one semester project requiring written arguments and explanations related to TESL content. Students engage in class discussions and homework assignments related to critically evaluating topics related to TESL content. Students write a term paper for each course or complete a semester project requiring research and the adequate presentation of that research. Students engaged in class discussions and homework assignments where they are asked to clearly present their findings, understanding of topics, and opinions. Students write one term paper and also often complete one semester project requiring written arguments and explanations related to TESL content using a formal academic style. Students write one term paper and also often complete one semester project requiring a conclusion that synthesizes the information discussed. Students write a term paper related to important theories and theorists in the field of TESL. Students write term papers, complete semester projects and make presentations based on these activities, all requiring clear introductions. Students write a term paper for each course or complete a semester project requiring research supporting their topic. Students write a term paper for each course and complete a semester project requiring research supporting their topic. 27

28 Students write a term paper for each course and complete semester projects requiring the explanation and clarification of ideas related to TESL. Students engage in class discussions and written homework assignments where the use of TESL terminology is needed. Students write one term paper and also often complete one semester project requiring written arguments and explanations related to TESL content using a formal, objective, and academic style. Students use the internet to post homework assignments in blog/discussion forums. Students peer review and provide feedback to fellow students concerning the term papers that they are writing. Students write a term paper for each course or complete a semester project requiring research through the library databases and the internet and careful paraphrasing and citing of the information found. Students are continually writing throughout the semester, from daily reflections and journaling to term papers. TSL/ED 460 Introduction to all Core Content All Reading and Writing Applicable KCAS CC.6-8.W.1a-e CC.6-8.W.2a-f CC.6-8.W.4-10 CC.9-10.W.1.c-e CC.9-10.W.2a-f CC.9-10.W.4-10 CC W.1-1a CC W.1.c-e CC W.2.a-c CC W.2.e CC W.4-10 Use reference materials Make sense of professional reading materials Make sense of observations in field experiences Make sense of things they hear in field experiences Communicate ideas & information Make presentations to peers Use computers & other technology to enhance instruction Interact with diverse ethnic & cultural groups Recognize continuity & change to make decisions Analyze & interpret human behaviors Be adaptable & flexible Make decisions based on ethical values Use productive team membership skills Be sensitive to multicultural ideas Demonstrate open mind to alternative perspectives Use critical thinking skills Use problem-solving processes Address situations from multiple perspectives Use knowledge base to gain new knowledge Expand knowledge by making connections Students write one term paper and also often complete one semester project requiring written arguments and explanations related to TESL content. Students engage in class discussions and homework assignments related to critically evaluating topics related to TESL content. Students write a term paper for each course or complete a semester project requiring research and the adequate presentation of that research. Students engaged in class discussions and homework assignments where they are asked to clearly present their findings, understanding of topics, and opinions. Students write one term paper and also often complete one semester project requiring written arguments and explanations related to TESL content using a formal academic style. Students write one term paper and also often complete one semester project requiring a conclusion that synthesizes the information discussed. Students write a term paper related to important theories and theorists in the field of TESL. Students write term papers, complete semester projects and make presentations based on these activities, all requiring clear introductions. Students write a term paper for each course or complete a semester project requiring research supporting their topic. Students write a term paper for each course and complete a semester project requiring research supporting their topic. Students write a term paper for each course and complete semester projects requiring the explanation and clarification of ideas related to TESL. Students engage in class discussions and written homework assignments where the use of TESL terminology is needed. Students write one term paper and also often complete one semester project requiring written arguments and explanations related to TESL content using a formal, objective, and academic style. Students use the internet to post homework assignments in blog/discussion forums. 28

29 Students peer review and provide feedback to fellow students concerning the term papers that they are writing. Students write a term paper for each course or complete a semester project requiring research through the library databases and the internet and careful paraphrasing and citing of the information found. Students are continually writing throughout the semester, from daily reflections and journaling to term papers. Students create their own blog page where they post daily journal entries and create their online portfolio highlighting their work. VIII. Integration of EPSB Themes: EPSB Themes/Examples from Courses: Analytic Matrix Course Title EPSB Theme 1: Diversity With specific attention to exceptional children including gifted/talented, cultural & ethnic diversity TSL/ED 240 TSL/ED 250 TSL/ED 340 TSL/ED 440 TSL/ED 460 Language and Culture TESL Assessment and Testing L2 Acquisition and the Skill Set Applied Linguistics and English Grammar TESL Methods and Materials for P-12 Teaching Given that the ELL student population is by its very nature culturally and ethnically diverse, all of our courses prepare the student to work with this unique student group while being culturally sensitive and appropriate. For example, students learn about the nature of culture itself and learn how to create assignments and assessments that are not culturally-bound and therefore confusing or difficult for their students. Given that the ELL student population is by its very nature culturally and ethnically diverse, all of our courses prepare the student to work with this unique student group while being culturally sensitive and appropriate. For example, students learn about the nature of culture itself and learn how to create assignments and assessments that are not culturally-bound and therefore confusing or difficult for their students. Given that the ELL student population is by its very nature culturally and ethnically diverse, all of our courses prepare the student to work with this unique student group while being culturally sensitive and appropriate. For example, students learn about the nature of culture itself and learn how to create assignments and assessments that are not culturally-bound and therefore confusing or difficult for their students. Given that the ELL student population is by its very nature culturally and ethnically diverse, all of our courses prepare the student to work with this unique student group while being culturally sensitive and appropriate. For example, students learn about the nature of culture itself and learn how to create assignments and assessments that are not culturally-bound and therefore confusing or difficult for their students. Given that the ELL student population is by its very nature culturally and ethnically diverse, all of our courses prepare the student to work with this unique student group while being culturally sensitive and appropriate. For example, students learn about the nature of culture itself and learn how to create assignments and assessments that are not culturally-bound and therefore confusing or difficult for their students. Course Title EPSB Theme 2: Assessment Develop skills to assess student learning TSL/ED TESL Assessment and Testing Students design appropriate sample assessments for the various skill 29

30 250 sets (speaking, listening, reading, writing and grammar). Course Title EPSB Theme 3: Literacy Education TSL/ED 250 TSL/ED 460 TESL Assessment and Testing TESL Methods and Materials for P-12 Teaching In our Assessment course, students learn how to accurately assess reading skills. In our Materials and Methods course, students create sample lesson plans related to reading skills. In our Assessment course, students learn how to accurately assess reading skills. In our Materials and Methods course, students create sample lesson plans related to reading skills. Course Title EPSB Theme 4: Closing the Achievement Gap Identify what courses emphasize strategies for closing the gap TSL/ED 240 Language and Culture TSL/ED 250 TSL/ED 340 TSL/ED 440 TSL/ED 460 TESL Assessment and Testing L2 Acquisition and Testing Applied Linguistics and English Grammar TESL Methods and Materials for P-12 Teaching IX. Program Faculty In all of our courses, students are taught to work with the ELL to help bring them up to speed with traditional students in the classroom. They learn about the manner in which languages are learned and how to create the proper environment conducive to learning. They learn how to create stimulating lesson plans and appropriate assessments. They learn about the nature of the English language itself and how to teach the rules and nuances of English to their future students. In all of our courses, students are taught to work with the ELL to help bring them up to speed with traditional students in the classroom. They learn about the manner in which languages are learned and how to create the proper environment conducive to learning. They learn how to create stimulating lesson plans and appropriate assessments. They learn about the nature of the English language itself and how to teach the rules and nuances of English to their future students. In all of our courses, students are taught to work with the ELL to help bring them up to speed with traditional students in the classroom. They learn about the manner in which languages are learned and how to create the proper environment conducive to learning. They learn how to create stimulating lesson plans and appropriate assessments. They learn about the nature of the English language itself and how to teach the rules and nuances of English to their future students. In all of our courses, students are taught to work with the ELL to help bring them up to speed with traditional students in the classroom. They learn about the manner in which languages are learned and how to create the proper environment conducive to learning. They learn how to create stimulating lesson plans and appropriate assessments. They learn about the nature of the English language itself and how to teach the rules and nuances of English to their future students. In all of our courses, students are taught to work with the ELL to help bring them up to speed with traditional students in the classroom. They learn about the manner in which languages are learned and how to create the proper environment conducive to learning. They learn how to create stimulating lesson plans and appropriate assessments. They learn about the nature of the English language itself and how to teach the rules and nuances of English to their future students. 30

31 List name, highest degree, area(s) of specialization, responsibilities in the program, and relationship to the institution, unit, and program. Do not send vitae. Name & Rank Erin Holmes Dr. Sandra Kroh Assistant Professor Andrea Giordana Highest Degree M.A. Ph.D. M.Ed. Field/University Assignment Scholarship Leadership in professiona l association s TESOL Campbellsville University Applied Linguistics Ball State University TESOL Shenandoah University Instructo r TSL 510 TSL 640 TSL 650 TSL 660 TSL 661 as able TSL 661 as needed X. Syllabi for all of the Endorsement Courses Full-time, ESL Endorsement Specialist Published 10+ textbooks for English in China; Published articles in Indiana TESOL journal; Presentations at Indiana and Kentucky TESOL conferences ESL Endorsement Specialist part-time instructo r Member, TESOL and KY TESOL Instructo r Service Instructor ESL Program Director since 2005 Colleague Assistant Director/ Relationship to Institution, Unit and Program FT to CU, FT to ESL program FT to CU, FT to ESL program Full-time ESLI Assistant Director/ Instructor in ESLI 31

32 Campbellsville University TSL/ED 240 Language and Culture Professor: Erin Holmes Address: 1 University Dr. UPO 821 Campbellsville, KY Phone: Office Hours: Office hours are posted on the professor s door, and the professor can be reached by phone or . The School of Education Model Empowerment for Learning I. REQUIRED TEXTS: Topics in Language and Culture for Teachers, Steven Brown and Jodi Eisterhold. Ann Arbor, Michigan. University of Michigan Press, II. III. COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course will assist pre-service and currently practicing teachers in understanding the diversity in foundational belief systems and world views and the relationship between the belief system/world view and how language is used to express those systems. It will introduce the student to the idea of universal and particular beliefs of various cultures. SCHOOL OF EDUCATION MISSION STATEMENT: The School of Education, in support of the mission of Campbellsville University, prepares teachers for their respective fields in society by providing an academic infrastructure based on scholarship, service and Christian leadership. The primary aim 32

33 of the program is to advance scholars who are competent, caring and qualified educators, who can positively impact student learning and who are committed to lifelong learning in a global society. The educator preparation program strives to achieve this mission globally by preparing educators who demonstrate the knowledge, skills and dispositions to plan, implement and evaluate instruction through information technology, honoring, understanding and respecting diverse voices and communities in society, establishing partnerships and collaborating with the professional community, supporting and enhancing Christian characteristics of servant leadership. IV. METHODS OF INSTRUCTION: The instructional methods will include: Group discussion (through Forums) Cooperative learning activities Classroom observation and site visits The primary format for the course will be discussion/forum. The instructor will coordinate discussions and guide collaborative relationships among all course participants. Students will spend considerable time conducting research, designing/selecting materials, undertaking peer teaching, observing classes, and critiquing each other s work. V. PURPOSE OF COURSE: The purpose of this course is to expose the student to a wide range of world views, and begin to have an understanding across cultures that will make the student to examine their own beliefs of what is a universal belief and what is not. VI. ALIGNMENT WITH CURRICULAR GUIDELINES AND NATIONAL STANDARDS: TESOL Standards (2002) This course meets the guidelines designated under TESOL s ESL standards for P-12 Teacher Education Programs: Domain 2: Culture Standard 2.a. Nature and the Role of Culture Standard 2.b. Cultural Groups and Identity Domain 5: Professionalism Standard 5.b. Partnerships and Advocacy Standard 5.c. Professional Development and Collaboration VII. COURSE OBJECTIVES: As a result of the experiences in this course, each class member will be able to demonstrate the ability to: 33

34 Demonstrate a knowledge of and appreciation for the language systems and cultural worldviews of the peoples of the world KTS 1 Demonstrate a general understanding of the nature of language and of the nature of culture. Understand how to look at language cross-culturally. Reflect on personal linguistic beliefs and attitudes. Recognize the diversity and similarities of language systems and world views. Recognize some personal biases and cultural assumptions. Plan, design, and implement instruction that reflects effective instructional principles. KTS 2, 3, 4 Understand and apply knowledge about cultural values and beliefs in the context of teaching ESL. TESOL Standards, Domain 2, Standard 2 Understand and apply knowledge about the effects of racism, stereotyping, and discrimination to ESL teaching and learning. TESOL Standards, Domain 2, Standard 2 Understand and apply concepts about the interrelationship between language and culture. TESOL Standards, Domain 2, Standard 2 Show sensitivity to individual and linguistic differences. KTS 3, KY School Personnel Code of Ethics Understand and apply knowledge about how an individual s cultural identity affects their ESL learning and how levels of cultural identity will vary widely among students. TESOL Standards, Domain 2, Standard 2 Describe how to present curriculum in a way that addresses linguistic diversity and learning styles in the classroom. Respond to students in a consistently sensitive and caring manner regardless of linguistic backgrounds and/or learning styles. Use effective communication and collaboration with parents/colleagues/administrators to enhance LEP student learning. KTS 1, 3, 4, 5, 7 Understand and apply knowledge about home/school communication to enhance ESL teaching and build partnerships with ESOL families. TESOL Standards, Domain 2, Standard 2 Communicate high expectations and challenge students in a positive and supportive manner by providing verbal and nonverbal cues to students and projecting genuine enthusiasm and interest in the topic and the students. Use effective communication strategies such as eye contact and body language in providing information and feedback to each student. Use computers and other technologies to enhance professional productivity and support instruction. KTS 6 34

35 Use a range of resources, including the Internet, to learn about world cultures and cultures of students in their classrooms and apply that learning to instruction. TESOL Standards, Domain 2, Standard 2 Course Assignments/Assessments 1. Class Participation 2. Students will be graded on their ability to ask pertinent questions and critically discuss issues related to the learning activities of the class (in forum discussions, study questions and reflective writing assignments). Class attendance is mandatory. Attendance is defined as checking into class each week, participating in online discussions, and attending any scheduled meetings. Failure to participate or attend will result in a failing grade. 3. Readings In class/online discussions will be based upon assigned readings. The readings are crucial to this course and the homework assignments will be based upon the readings. 4. Mid-term Project and Final Paper Details posted separately inside class in Learning House. These two tasks will take the place of a mid-term exam and a final exam. 5. Field Trip and Reflection Paper We will be taking a field trip this semester in our local region where we will get the chance to experience a unique piece of American culture. Following the field trip, students will need to write a two page reflection paper where they analyze their experience. Further details of the field trip will be provided later in the semester. 6. Observations The student will participate in 6 hours of site-based classroom observation of ESL children and youth. This should include at least two different classes with at least one LEP student, preferably in two different skill/knowledge areas, at two different levels, and taught by two different instructors. Each student will present a 10-minute oral report of their observation in class. Recorded observations will be made in typing. Practice will be provided in observing, recording and analyzing the classroom environment, instruction, and teacher/student interactions. Recorded documents should be typed and submitted to the professor. The following elements are expected in the report: 1. Place/Institution where you observed the classes 2. Instructor(s) 3. What you did in addition to observing 4. Students age. Proficiency level, and educational background 5. Students academic orientation, if applicable 6. Program/Curriculum orientation 7. Textbook(s) being used 8. Class size 9. Topic(s)/ Skills/Grammatical points covered/lessons objectives 10. How the material is presented 11. How the material is practiced 12. How the feedback is provided 35

36 13. Things you like the most about the classes you observed 14. Things that you would do different if you were to teach the classes 15. Any suggestions for the instructor and others in this class This will fulfill 6 hours of the 30-hour field experience required for students seeking endorsement from the state of Kentucky. Students who will be doing or have done the Ukraine practicum will be exempted. 7. Evaluation: Your final grade will be based upon the weekly homework assignments, the mid-term project, the field trip and reflection paper, and the final paper. Your overall score will be based on a weighted system as explained below: Assignments Percentage of Overall Grade Classroom Participation/Readings/Homework 25% Midterm Project 25% Field Trip & Reflection Paper 25% Final Paper 25% Grading Scale: A = % B = 80-89% C = 70-79% D = 60-69% F = below 60% Disability Statement: Campbellsville University is committed to reasonable accommodations for students who have documented learning and physical disabilities, as well as medical and emotional conditions. If you have a documented disability or condition of this nature, you may be eligible for disability services. Documentation must be from a licensed professional and current in terms of assessment. Please contact the Director of Disability Services at to inquire about services. In case of emergencies, Campus Security can be reached at the following numbers: Office (270) ; Cell Phone: (270) BOOK LIST Althen, Gary, Amanda Doran, Susan Szmania, & Gary Gardner. (2003) American Ways: A Guide for Foreigners in the United States, 2 nd Ed. Intercultural Press.* Arnold, J. (1999) Affect and language learning. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.* Axtell, Roger. (1990) Do s and Taboos of Hosting International Visitors. John Wiley & Sons. * 36

37 Barnet/Berman/Burto. (1984) Literature for Composition. Little, Brown and Company.* Bassano, S. and Christison, M.A (1995b). Community spirit: A practical guide to collaborative language learning. San Francisco, CA: Alta Book Center. Bryson, Bill. (1990) The Mother Tongue English and How It Got That Way. Morrow.* Cranmer, David. (1996) Motivating High Level Learners. Longman.* Diaz-Rico, L. and Weed, K. (2002). The Crosscultural, language, and academic development handbook (2d ed.) Boston: Allyn and Bacon.* ESL Standards for Pre-K-12 Students. (1997). Alexandria, VA TESOL. * Grades 6-8, Suzanne Irujo, Editor Grades 9-12, Barbara Agor, Editor Grades Pre-K-2, Betty Ansin Smallwood, Editor Grades, 3-5, Katharine Davies Samway, Editor Evans, Faun Bernbach. (1997) A World of Diversity: Multicultural Readings in the News. NTC Publishing Group.* Fu, Danling. (1995) My Trouble Is My English Asian Students and the American Dream. Boynton/Cook.* Gardner, David, & Lindsay Miller, eds.. (1996) Tasks for Independent Language Learning. Alexandria, VA: TESOL. * Gebhard, J. and Oprandy, R. (1999) Language teaching awareness: A Guide to exploring beliefs and practices. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.* Gesteland, Richard. (1999) Cross-Cultural Business Behavior: Marketing, Negotiating and Managing Across Cultures. Copenhagen Business School. * Gibson, Robert. (2002). Intercultural Business Communication. Oxford University Press.* Hall, Charles. (1994) Working with the ESL Student. Harcourt Brace & Company.* Hill, L. A., (1981) Advanced Anecdotes in American English. Oxford University Press. * Hill, L. A., (1981) Elementary Anecdotes in American English. Oxford University Press.* Hill, L. A., (1981) Intermediate Anecdotes in American English. Oxford University Press.* Horwitz, E., and Young, D. (1991). Language anxiety: From theory and research to classroom implications. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall. 37

38 Igoa, C. (1995). The inner world of the immigrant child. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlaum. Jordan, R. (1997) English for Academic Purposes: A Guide and Resource Book for Teachers. Cambridge University.* Judy, Stephen N. (1989). Explorations in the Teaching of English. Harper/Row Publishers.* Kerwin, Michael. (1996) Topics and Language Competencies. Prentice Hall Regents. * Law, Barbara/ Eckes, Mary. (1990). The More Than Just Serving Handbook: ESL for every classroom teacher. Peguis Publishers Limited. * Lee, W. R. (1986). Language Teaching Games and Contests. Oxford University Press.* Lewis, G. and Bedson, G. (1999). Games for children. Oxford, England: Oxford University.* Lightbown, P. and Spada, N. (1999). How languages are learned, 2d edition. Oxford: Oxford University.* McCallum, George P. (1980). 101 Word Games. Oxford University Press.* McGroarty, M. (1992). Cooperative learning: The benefits for content-area teaching. In Richard-Amato, P., and M.A. Snow, eds. The multicultural classroom: Readings for content area teachers. White Plains, NY: Pearson Education/ Longman, pp Morgan, Brian. (1998) The ESL Classroom: Teaching, Critical Practice, and Community Development. University of Toronto. * Pipher, Mary. (2002). The Middle of Everywhere: The World s Refugees Come to Our Town. Harcourt.* Reid, Joy. (1995). Learning Styles in the ESL/EFL Classroom. Heinle & Heinle.* Reid, Joy. (1998) Understanding Learning Styles in the Second Language Classroom. Prentice Hall Regents. * Richard Amato, P. and Snow, M. A. (1991). The multicultural classroom: Readings for contentarea teachers. (2d ed.) White Plains, NY: Addison-Wesley. Richard-Amato, P. (1997). Affect and related factors in second and foreign language acquisition. In TESOL s Voices of Experience Series. Alexandria, VA: TESOL.* Romaine, Suzanne. (1992) The Cambridge History of English Language Vol. 4. Cambridge University Press.* 38

39 Schulman, J. and Mesa-Bains (eds.) (1993). Diversity in the classroom: A casebook for teachers and teacher educators. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum. Schumann, J. (1997). The neurobiology of affect in language. Oxford: Blackwell. Shameem, Nikhat, & Makhan Tickoo, eds., (1999). New Ways in Using Communicative Games in Language Teaching. Alexandria, VA: TESOL. * Snow, Marguerite, ed. (2000). Implementing the ESL Standards for Pre-K-12 Students Through Teacher Education. Arlington, VA TESOL. * Spratt, Mary. (1994) English for the Teacher. Cambridge University Press.* Tchudi, Stephen N. (1986). English Teachers at Work: Ideas and Strategies from five countries. Boyton/Cook Publishers Inc.* Trudgill, Peter and Hannah, Jean. (1985) International English: A Guide to Varieties of Standard English. Edward Arnold.* Tucker, Amy. (1995). Decoding ESL. Boyton/Cook Publishers Inc.* Warschauer, Mark, Heidi Shetzer, & Christine Meloni. (2000). Internet for English Teaching. Alexandria, VA: TESOL.* Windeatt, S., Hardisty, D., and Eastment, D. (2000). The Internet. New York: Oxford University Press.* 39

40 TESL Assessment and Testing ED/TSL 250 Instructor: Mrs. Erin Holmes Address: 1 University Dr. UPO 821 Campbellsville, KY Phone: Office: AB 300 School of Education Model Empowerment for Learning I. REQUIRED TEXTS: Authentic Assessment for English Language Learners: Practical Approaches for Teachers, J. Michael O Malley and Lorraine Valdez Pierce. NY, NY, Longman, ISBN II. III. COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course is a survey of the principles and practices of second language classroom and standardized testing and evaluation, and of assessment of levels of proficiency for initial placement. Exposure to various types of tests and test items with a view toward designing and critiquing classroom tests is provided. Various commercial tests are evaluated. SCHOOL OF EDUCATION MISSION STATEMENT: The School of Education, in support of the mission of Campbellsville University, prepares teachers for their respective fields in society by providing an academic infrastructure based on scholarship, service and Christian leadership. The primary aim of the program is to advance scholars who are competent, caring and qualified 40

41 educators, who can positively impact student learning and who are committed to lifelong learning in a global society. The educator preparation program strives to achieve this mission globally by preparing educators who demonstrate the knowledge, skills and dispositions to plan, implement and evaluate instruction through information technology, honoring, understanding and respecting diverse voices and communities in society, establishing partnerships and collaborating with the professional community, supporting and enhancing Christian characteristics of servant leadership. IV. METHODS OF INSTRUCTION: The instructional methods will include: Group discussion (through Forums) Cooperative learning activities Classroom observation and site visits The primary format for the course will be discussion/forum. The instructor will coordinate discussions and guide collaborative relationships among all course participants. Students will spend considerable time conducting research, designing/selecting materials, undertaking peer teaching, observing classes, and critiquing each other s work. V. PURPOSE OF COURSE: The purpose of this course is to develop students understanding of the principles and issues involving tests and evaluation in the second language classroom, and assessment tools and methods for initial placement and proficiency level. VI. ALIGNMENT WITH CURRICULAR GUIDELINES AND NATIONAL STANDARDS: TESOL Standards (2002) This course meets the guidelines designated under TESOL s ESL standards for P-12 Teacher Education Programs: Domain 4: Assessment Standard 4.a. Issues of Assessment for ESL Standard 4.b. Language Proficiency Assessment Standard 4.c. Classroom-Based Assessment for ESL VII. COURSE OBJECTIVES: As a result of the experiences in this course, each class member will be able to demonstrate the ability to: 1. Manage ESL/LEP student work and assess learning results. KTS 5 2. Use multiple assessments, both summative and formative, and sources of data including a range of assessment activities such as observation; interview; log or journal, guided, 41

42 collaborative, or independent practice; tests or quizzes; and portfolios, projects or performance tasks. KTS 5 3. Systematically collect and maintain up-to-date records of student progress using detailed record keeping systems, anecdotal records, and rubrics/scoring guides. KTS 5 4. Promote student self-assessment by clearly explaining criteria or rubrics to provide opportunities for students to apply them to their own work. KTS 5 5. Gather background information and administer nonbiased formal and informal assessment. KTS 5 6. Interpret information from formal and informal, summative and formative assessments. KTS 5 7. Use assessment information in making eligibility, program, and placement decisions for LEP individuals. KTS 5, 8 8. Report assessment results to all stakeholders using effective communication skills. KTS 8 9. Demonstrate legal and ethical considerations in assessment. KTS 1 KY Personnel Code of Ethics 10. Understand standardized measurement related to referral, eligibility, program planning, instruction, and placement for LEP individuals. KTS 1, 2, 3, 4, Understand the appropriate use and limitation of various types of assessments. KTS Use computers to conduct assessment. KTS 6 CONTENT OUTLINE: This course will begin by looking at the theoretical issues of assessment, such as testing, evaluation, direction, construction, and administration. These issues will then be used to construct various types of tests for all levels of second language learners. Students will examine and develop rubrics for evaluating different kinds of standardized tests and alternative methods of assessment. There will also be a focus on the use of assessment results for eligibility and correct placement purposes. English Language Proficiency Levels rubrics will be studied. Course Assignments/Assessments 8. Class Participation Students will be graded on their ability to ask pertinent questions and critically discuss issues related to the learning activities of the class (in forum discussions, study questions and reflective writing assignments). Class attendance is mandatory. Attendance is defined as checking into class each week, participating in online discussions, and attending scheduled meetings (as listed in our tentative class schedule during week 4 and for our mid-term). Failure to participate or attend will result in a failing grade. 9. Observations/Assessment Study The student will participate in 6 hours of site-based classroom observation of ESL children and youth. The student should learn what kind of pre- and post- testing and progress testing is done with LEP students from an experienced classroom teacher who has LEP student(s) in his/her classroom. This should include at least two ESL classes, preferably in two different skill/knowledge areas, at two different levels, and taught by two different instructors. Each student will present a 10-minute oral report of their experience when they return to class. Recorded 42

43 observations will be made in typing. Practice will be provided in observing, recording and analyzing the classroom environment, instruction, and teacher/student interactions. Recorded documents should be typed and submitted to the professor. The following elements are expected in the report: 15. Place/Institution where you observed the classes 16. Instructor(s) 17. What you did in addition to observing 18. Students age. Proficiency level, and educational background 19. Students academic orientation, if applicable 20. Program/Curriculum orientation 21. Textbook(s) being used 22. Class size 23. Topic(s)/ Skills/Grammatical points covered/lessons objectives 24. How the material is presented 25. How the material is practiced 26. How the feedback is provided 27. Things you like the most about the classes you observed 28. Things that you would do different if you were to teach the classes 15. Any suggestions for the instructor and others in this class This will fulfill 6 hours of the 30-hour field experience required for students seeking endorsement from the state of Kentucky. Students who will be doing or have done the Ukraine practicum will be exempted. 10. Sample Tests Students will develop one sample test for each of the following language skill areas: 1) reading comprehension, 2) writing, 3) grammar, 4) speaking/listening and 5) vocabulary. Each test should be a thirty-minute or twenty-item test, and should use a different specific technique (scaffolding strategies, cloze, dictation, etc.). Each test should include the following components: a heading with purpose, skill/ability tested, level, time allotment, directions, an example, the test items, and a separate answer key. Grading System: Grading Scale: Assignments A = % Classroom Participation B = 80-89% Observations/Resource List C = 70-79% Sample Tests D = 60-69% Mid-term Project F = below Disability Statement: Campbellsville University is committed to reasonable accommodations for students who have documented learning and physical disabilities, as well as medical and emotional conditions. If you have a documented disability or condition of this nature, you may be eligible for disability services. Documentation must be from a licensed professional and current in terms of assessment. Please contact the Director of Disability Services at to inquire about services. 43

44 BOOK LIST Brown, J.D. (1998) New Ways of Classroom Assessment. Alexandria, VA: TESOL. * Ekbatani, G. and Pierson, H. eds. (2000). Learner-Directed Assessment in ESL. Mawhah, NJ: Erlbaum. ESL Standards for Pre-K-12 Students. (1997). Alexandria, VA TESOL. * Gardner, David, & Lindsay Miller, eds.. (1996) Tasks for Independent Language Learning. Alexandria, VA: TESOL. * Genesee, F. and Upshur, J. (1996). Classroom-Based Evaluation in Second Language Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.* Integrating the ESL Standards into Classroom Practice (2000)* Johnson, Brian (1987) Assessing English: Helping Students to reflect on their work. St. Clair Press.* Kerwin, Michael. (1996) Topics and Language Competencies. Prentice Hall Regents. * Madsen, Harold. (1983). Techniques in Testing. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Mohan, B. (1992). What are we really testing? In P. Richard-Amato and M.A Snow, eds. (1991). The multicultural classroom: Readings for content area teachers. White Plains, NY: Longman, pp Morgan, Brian. (1998) The ESL Classroom: Teaching, Critical Practice, and Community Development. University of Toronto. * O Malley, J.M and Pierce, L.V (1996). Authentic assessment for English language learners: Pratical approaches for teachers. Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley. Reid, Joy. (1995). Learning Styles in the ESL/EFL Classroom. Heinle & Heinle.* Reid, Joy. (1998) Understanding Learning Styles in the Second Language Classroom. Prentice Hall Regents. * Scenarios for ESL Standards-Based Assessment. (2001). TESOL. * Short, D. (1993). Assessing integrated language and content instruction. TESOL Quartely, 27 (4):

45 Snow, Marguerite, ed. (2000). Implementing the ESL Standards for Pre-K-12 Students Through Teacher Education. Arlington, VA TESOL. * Tucker, Amy. (1995). Decoding ESL. Boyton/Cook Publishers Inc.* Warschauer, Mark, Heidi Shetzer, & Christine Meloni. (2000). Internet for English Teaching. Alexandria, VA: TESOL.* Windeatt, S., Hardisty, D., and Eastment, D. (2000). The Internet. New York: Oxford University Press.* 45

46 L2 Acquisition and the Skill Set TSL/ED 340 Instructor: Mrs. Erin Holmes Address: 1 University Dr. UPO 821 Campbellsville, KY Phone: Office: AB 300 Office Hours: Office hours are posted on the professor s door, and the professor can be reached any time by phone or . The School of Education Model Empowerment for Learning I. REQUIRED TEXTS: Saville-Troike, Muriel. Introducing Second Language Acquisition. Cambridge University Press ISBN II. III. COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course will assist pre-service and currently practicing teachers in understanding how language is learned, and therefore in understanding how to better teach the English language. There will be an emphasis on the impact of the theories of second language acquisition on ESL/EFL pedagogy. SCHOOL OF EDUCATION MISSION STATEMENT: 46

47 The School of Education, in support of the mission of Campbellsville University, prepares teachers for their respective fields in society by providing an academic infrastructure based on scholarship, service and Christian leadership. The primary aim of the program is to advance scholars who are competent, caring and qualified educators, who can positively impact student learning and who are committed to lifelong learning in a global society. The educator preparation program strives to achieve this mission globally by preparing educators who demonstrate the knowledge, skills and dispositions to plan, implement and evaluate instruction through information technology, honoring, understanding and respecting diverse voices and communities in society, establishing partnerships and collaborating with the professional community, supporting and enhancing Christian characteristics of servant leadership. IV. METHODS OF INSTRUCTION: The instructional methods will include: Discussions Group discussion (plenary and small group) Cooperative learning activities Classroom observation and site visits The primary format for the course will be discussion/forum. The instructor will coordinate discussions and guide collaborative relationships among all course participants. Students will spend considerable time preparing reading assignments for class discussion, and observing classes. V. PURPOSE OF COURSE: The purpose of this course is to develop students understanding of how language (first, second, or other) is learned and how that knowledge should inform and impact ESL pedagogy for each area of the skill set. VI. ALIGNMENT WITH CURRICULAR GUIDELINES AND NATIONAL STANDARDS: TESOL Standards (2002) This course meets the guidelines designated under TESOL s ESL standards for P-12 Teacher Education Programs: Domain 1: Language Standard 1.a. Describing Language Standard 1.b. Language Acquisition and Development Domain 3: Planning, Implementing, and Managing Instruction Standard 3.a. Planning for Standards-Based ESL and Content Instruction Standard 3.b. Managing and Implementing Standards-Based ESL and Content Instruction Standard 3.c. Using Resources Effectively in ESL and Content Instruction 47

48 Domain 5: Professionalism Standard 5.a. ESL Research and History Standard 5.b. Professional Development and Collaboration VII. COURSE OBJECTIVES: As a result of the experiences in this course, each class member will be able to demonstrate the ability to: Demonstrate a knowledge of and appreciation for second language acquisition. KTS 1 Demonstrate knowledge of the historical context for the empirical study of classroom language acquisition by examining early attempts to formulate a theory of L2 acquisition. Demonstrate knowledge of a wide range of research which has investigated classroom language acquisition. Demonstrate knowledge of theories of second language acquisition which is compatible with the results of this research. Understand the theoretical concepts/models of reading in general and second language reading in particular. Understand the theoretical concepts/models of writing in general and second language reading in particular. Understand the theoretical concepts/models of oral communication in general and second language reading in particular. Understand the theoretical concepts/models of aural in general and second language reading in particular. Demonstrate a general understanding of human language and a heightened sensitivity to the language encountered daily. Plan, design, and implement instruction that reflects effective instructional management principles. KTS 2, 3, 4 Gain experience in practicing techniques for teaching reading, writing, oral and aural communication by designing lessons, activities, units and courses for various English proficiency levels. Write and execute reading, writing, oral and aural activities. Critically evaluate existing ESL/EFL reading, writing, oral and aural texts and materials, and to create original materials for teaching each skill. Show sensitivity to individual and linguistic differences. KTS 3, KY School Personnel Code of Ethics Describe how to present curriculum in a way that addresses linguistic diversity and learning styles in the classroom. Respond to students in a consistently sensitive and caring manner regardless of linguistic backgrounds and/or learning styles. 48

49 Use effective communication and collaboration with parents/colleagues/administrators to enhance LEP student learning. KTS 1, 3, 4, 5, 8 Communicate high expectations and challenge students in a positive and supportive manner by providing verbal and nonverbal cues to students and projecting genuine enthusiasm and interest in the topic and the students. Use effective communication strategies such as eye contact and body language in providing information and feedback to each student. Accurately communicate skills and concepts related to ESL by providing sufficient demonstration and practice. Use computers and other technologies to enhance professional productivity and support instruction. KTS 6 Understand and apply CALL (Computer Assisted Language Learning) for the benefit of ESL learners, and cite examples of its use. Course Assignments/Assessments 11. Class Participation Students will be graded on their ability to ask pertinent questions and critically discuss issues related to the learning activities of the class (in online forums, study questions and reflective writing assignments). Class attendance is mandatory. Attendance is defined as checking into class each week, participating in online discussions, and attending mandatory scheduled meetings (i.e. the mid-term presentations and the finals week meeting). Failure to participate or attend will result in a failing grade. 12. Observations/Tutoring The student will participate in 6 hours of site-based classroom observation of ESL children and youth. This should include at least two ESL classes, preferably in two different skill/knowledge areas, at two different levels, and taught by two different instructors. The student will work individually with at least 2 different LEP children in their classroom. Each student will present a 10-minute oral report of their experience when they return to class. Recorded observations will be made in typing. Practice will be provided in observing, recording and analyzing the classroom environment, instruction, and teacher/student interactions. Recorded documents should be typed and submitted to the professor. The following elements are expected in the report: 29. Place/Institution where you observed the classes 30. Instructor(s) 31. What you did in addition to observing 32. Students age. Proficiency level, and educational background 33. Students academic orientation, if applicable 34. Program/Curriculum orientation 35. Textbook(s) being used 36. Class size 37. Topic(s)/ Skills/Grammatical points covered/lessons objectives 49

50 38. How the material is presented 39. How the material is practiced 40. How the feedback is provided 41. Things you like the most about the classes you observed 42. Things that you would do different if you were to teach the classes 15. Any suggestions for the instructor and others in this class This will fulfill 6 hours of the 30-hour field experience required for students seeking endorsement from the state of Kentucky. Students who will be doing or have done the Ukraine practicum will be exempted. 13. Papers and projects There will be weekly writing assignments, one research paper, and one on-going project. Grading System: Grading Scale: Assignments A = % Classroom Participation B = 80-89% Research Paper C = 70-79% Weekly Reflections/Assignments D = 60-69% Final Project F = below 60% Disability Statement: Campbellsville University is committed to reasonable accommodations for students who have documented learning and physical disabilities, as well as medical and emotional conditions. If you have a documented disability or condition of this nature, you may be eligible for disability services. Documentation must be from a licensed professional and current in terms of assessment. Please contact the Director of Disability Services at to inquire about services. VIII. BOOK LIST Adams, W. Royce / Brody, Jane. (1983) Reading Beyond Words. Holt, Rinehart and Winston.* Allen, Edward, Rebecca Valette. (1994) Classroom Techniques: Foreign Languages and English as a Second Language. Waveland Press.* Arnold, J. (1999) Affect and language learning. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.* Barnet/Berman/Burto. (1984) Literature for Composition. Little, Brown and Company.* Bassano, S. and Christison, M.A (1995b). Community spirit: A practical guide to collaborative language learning. San Francisco, CA: Alta Book Center. Belcher, Diane, & George Braine. (1995) Academic Writing in a Second Language: Essays on Research and Pedagogy. Ablex Publishing Corporation. * Bell, Arthur/ Klammer, Thomas. (1983) The Practicing Writer. Houghton Mifflin Company.* 50

51 Berish, Lynda, & Sandra Thibaudeau. (1999) Amazing Stories: To Tell & Retell. Houghton Mifflin Company.* Blumenthel, Joseph C. (1981) English 3200 A Programmed course in Grammar and Usage. Hartcourt Brace Jovanich Inc. * Brisk, M. and Harrington, M. (2000). Literacy and bilingualism: a handbook for all teachers. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum. Brown, James I. (1987). Reading Power. D. C Heath and Company. * Celce-Murcia, Marianne. (1994) Teaching English as a Second or Foreign Language. Heinle & Heinle Publishers.* Celce-Murcia, Marianne/ Diane Larsen-Freeman. (1999) The Grammar Book. An ESL/EFL Teachers Course. Heinle & Heinle. * Chapelle, C. (2001). Computer applications in second language acquisition. New York: Cambridge University Press.* Choy, Penelope/ McCormick, James. (1985) Basic Grammar and Usage. Hartcourt Brace Jovanich Publishers.* Cranmer, David. (1996) Motivating High Level Learners. Longman.* Crookall, D., and Oxford, R., eds., (1990). Simulation, gaming, and language learning. New York: Newbury House. Diaz-Rico, L. and Weed, K. (2002). The Crosscultural, language, and academic development handbook (2d ed.) Boston: Allyn and Bacon.* Dubin, F. & Olshtain, E Course design: developing programs and materials for language leraning. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.* Ellis, R. (1997). Second language acquisition. Oxford: Oxford University.* ESL Standards for Pre-K-12 Students. (1997). Alexandria, VA TESOL. * Freedman, S., ed. (1989). The Acquisition of Written Language: Response and Revision. Norwood, NJ: Ablex. Gardner, David, & Lindsay Miller, eds.. (1996) Tasks for Independent Language Learning. Alexandria, VA: TESOL. * Hall, Charles. (1994) Working with the ESL Student. Harcourt Brace & Company.* 51

52 Hill, L. A., (1981) Advanced Anecdotes in American English. Oxford University Press. * Hill, L. A., (1981) Elementary Anecdotes in American English. Oxford University Press.* Hill, L. A., (1981) Intermediate Anecdotes in American English. Oxford University Press.* Horwitz, E., and Young, D. (1991). Language anxiety: From theory and research to classroom implications. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall. Igoa, C. (1995). The inner world of the immigrant child. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlaum. Integrating the ESL Standards into Classroom Practice (2000)* Jordan, R. (1997) English for Academic Purposes: A Guide and Resource Book for Teachers. Cambridge University.* Judy, Stephen N. (1989). Explorations in the Teaching of English. Harper/Row Publishers.* Kerwin, Michael. (1996) Topics and Language Competencies. Prentice Hall Regents. * Kreefi-Peyton Joy. (1990) Dialogue Journal : Writing with Nonnative English Speakers. A Handbook For Teachers. * Kroll, B. (1990). Second language writing: Research insights for the classroom. New York: Cambridge University Press. Language Through Literature. The University of Michigan Press.* Larsen-Freeman, D. (1995) On the teaching and learning of grammar: Challenging the myths. In F. Eckman et al., eds., Second language acquisition theory and pedagogy. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbraum. Larsen-Freeman, D. and Long, M. (1991). An Introduction to Second Language Acquisition Research. London: Longman. Larsen-Freeman, Diane (L-F), Techniques and Principles of Language Teaching. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Law, Barbara/ Eckes, Mary. (1990). The More Than Just Serving Handbook: ESL for every classroom teacher. Peguis Publishers Limited. * Le Master, Jordan. (1980) Making Sense Of Grammar. Teachers College Press.* Lee, W. R. (1986). Language Teaching Games and Contests. Oxford University Press.* 52

53 Leki, Ilona. (1992) Understanding ESL writers; A Guide for Teachers. Boyton/Cook Publishers.* Lewis, G. and Bedson, G. (1999). Games for children. Oxford, England: Oxford University.* Lightbown, P. and Spada, N. (1999). How languages are learned, 2d edition. Oxford: Oxford University.* McCallum, George P. (1980). 101 Word Games. Oxford University Press.* McGroarty, M. (1992). Cooperative learning: The benefits for content-area teaching. In Richard-Amato, P., and M.A. Snow, eds.(1991). The multicultural classroom: Readings for content area teachers. White Plains, NY: Pearson Education/ Longman, pp Morgan, Brian. (1998) The ESL Classroom: Teaching, Critical Practice, and Community Development. University of Toronto. * Newwirk, Thomas. (1986) To Compose: Teaching English in the High School. Heinemann.* Reid, Joy (1990). Teaching ESL Writing. Prentice Hall Regents.* Reid, Joy. (1995). Learning Styles in the ESL/EFL Classroom. Heinle & Heinle.* Reid, Joy. (1998) Understanding Learning Styles in the Second Language Classroom. Prentice Hall Regents. * Resnick, Judith. (1984) Reading and Reasoning. MacMillan Publishing Company.* Reynolds, Audrey L. (1983) Exploring Written English. Little, Brown and Company.* Richard Amato, P. and Snow, M. A. (1991). The multicultural classroom: Readings for contentarea teachers. (2d ed.) White Plains, NY: Addison-Wesley. Richard-Amato, P. (1997). Affect and related factors in second and foreign language acquisition. In TESOL s Voices of Experience Series. Alexandria, VA: TESOL.* Richards, Jack C. (1996) Functional English Grammar: An Introduction for Second Language Teachers. Cambridge University Press.* Roman, Kenneth/ Raphaelson, Joel. (1981) Writing that Works. Harper and Row Publishers.* Roth, Audrey J./ Altshuler, Thelma. (1985) Writing Step by Step. Houghton Mifflin Company.* Scenarios for ESL Standards-Based Assessment. (2001). TESOL. * Schoenberg, Irene E. (1994) Focus on Grammar. Addison-Wesley Publishing Company.* 53

54 Schram-Pfeazar, Betty. (1996) Basic English Grammar. Pretince Hall Regents.* Schultz, M., and Fisher, A. (1988). Games for all reasons: Interacting in the language classroom. Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley. Schumann, J. (1997). The neurobiology of affect in language. Oxford: Blackwell. Shameem, Nikhat & Makhan Tickoo, eds., (1999). New Ways in Using Communicative Games in Language Teaching. Alexandria, VA: TESOL. * Snow, Marguerite, ed. (2000). Implementing the ESL Standards for Pre-K-12 Students Through Teacher Education. Arlington, VA TESOL. * Spangenberg-Urbschat, Karen/ Pritchard, Robert. (1994) Kids Come in All Languages: Reading Instruction for ESL Students. IRA. * Spratt, Mary. (1994) English for the Teacher. Cambridge University Press.* Stempleski, S., and Tomalin, B. (1990). Video in action: Recipes for using video in language teaching. New York: Prentice Hall Regents. Tchudi, Stephen N. (1986). English Teachers at Work: Ideas and Strategies from five countries. Boyton/Cook Publishers Inc.* Warschauer, Mark, Heidi Shetzer, & Christine Meloni. (2000). Internet for English Teaching. Alexandria, VA: TESOL.* Watkins/Dillingham/Hiers. (1986) Practical English Workbook. Houghton Mifflin Company.* Weaver, Constance. (1996) Teaching Grammar In Context. Boyton/Cook Publishers.* Williams, James D. (1999) The Teacher Grammar Book. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.* Willis/Quinn. (1983) Basic Usage, Vocabulary and Composition. Holt, Rinehart and Winston.* Windeatt, S., Hardisty, D., and Eastment, D. (2000). The Internet. New York: Oxford University Press.* Zamel, V. (1992). Writing one s way into reading. TESOL Quartely, 26 (3),

55 Campbellsville University School of Education TSL/ED 440 Applied Linguistics and English Grammar Professor: Mrs. Erin Holmes Address: 1 University Dr. UPO 821 Campbellsville, KY Phone: Office Hours: The professor can be reached any time by phone or . The School of Education Model Empowerment for Learning I. REQUIRED TEXTS: The Study of Language. Yule, G. Cambridge University Press, ISBN# II. COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course will assist pre-service and currently practicing teachers in understanding the linguistic sciences such as phonology, morphology, semantics, psycholinguistics, sociolinguistics, the nature of language and how it is learned, and the history of the English language. There will be an emphasis on the impact of the theories of linguistics on ESL/EFL pedagogy. This course is also a review of modern English Grammar for teachers and of the rules L2 learners need for language decision making and self-monitoring. It will promote an understanding of how the linguistic sciences affect L2 learner processing of English grammar. 55

56 III. SCHOOL OF EDUCATION MISSION STATEMENT: The School of Education, in support of the mission of Campbellsville University, prepares teachers for their respective fields in society by providing an academic infrastructure based on scholarship, service and Christian leadership. The primary aim of the program is to advance scholars who are competent, caring and qualified educators, who can positively impact student learning and who are committed to lifelong learning in a global society. The educator preparation program strives to achieve this mission globally by preparing educators who demonstrate the knowledge, skills and dispositions to plan, implement and evaluate instruction through information technology, honoring, understanding and respecting diverse voices and communities in society, establishing partnerships and collaborating with the professional community, supporting and enhancing Christian characteristics of servant leadership. IV. METHODS OF INSTRUCTION: The instructional methods will include: Online Group discussion and reflections Cooperative learning activities and projects Classroom observation and site visits The primary format for the course will be online. The instructor will coordinate online discussions and guide collaborative relationships among all course participants. Students will spend considerable time preparing reading assignments for discussion, undertaking observations for the group project, and preparing research. V. PURPOSE OF COURSE: The purpose of this course is to develop students understanding of the principles and issues of applied linguistics, and to review modern English grammar and the rules that L2 learners need in order to process and use it so that the students are able to relate those issues to their own ESL teaching. VI. ALIGNMENT WITH CURRICULAR GUIDELINES AND NATIONAL STANDARDS: TESOL Standards (2002) This course meets the guidelines designated under TESOL s ESL standards for P-12 Teacher Education Programs: Domain 1: Language Standard 1.a. Describing Language Standard 1.b. Language Acquisition and Development Domain 3: Planning, Implementing, and Managing Instruction 56

57 Standard 3.a. Planning for Standards-Based ESL and Content Instruction Standard 3.b. Managing and Implementing Standards-Based ESL and Content Instruction Standard 3.c. Using Resources Effectively in ESL and Content Instruction Domain 5: Professionalism Standard 5.a. ESL Research and History Standard 5.b. Professional Development and Collaboration VII. COURSE OBJECTIVES: As a result of the experiences in this course, each class member will be able to demonstrate the ability to: Demonstrate a knowledge of and appreciation for the language systems of the world, and an in-depth knowledge of modern English grammar. New Teacher Standards VIII Demonstrate a general understanding of human language and a heightened sensitivity to the language encountered daily. Understand how to look at language objectively. Reflect on personal linguistic beliefs and attitudes. Recognize the diversity and similarities of language systems. Recognize uninformed statements about language. Identify and describe most of the subfields of linguistics including phonetics, phonology, morphology, semantics and syntax, synchronic and diachronic linguistics, psycholinguistics and sociolinguistics. Apply knowledge of the relationships of language systems to each other and within a single language system, especially modern English, to more effective teaching of English language learners. Demonstrate a knowledge of modern English and its grammatical rules. Recognize grammar errors in LEP student language samples and explain how, why, when and whether or not to correct them. Plan, design, and implement instruction that reflects effective instructional management principles. KTS 2, 3, 4 Explain and model English grammar to LEP learners. Create, design and implement effective activities for the teaching and practice of English grammar and its rules. Show sensitivity to individual and linguistic differences. KTS 3, KY School Personnel Code of Ethics Describe how to present curriculum in a way that addresses linguistic diversity and learning styles in the classroom. Respond to students in a consistently sensitive and caring manner regardless of linguistic backgrounds and/or learning styles. 57

58 Use effective communication and collaboration with parents/colleagues/administrators to enhance LEP student learning. KTS 1, 3, 4, 5, 8 Communicate high expectations and challenge students in a positive and supportive manner by providing verbal and nonverbal cues to students and projecting genuine enthusiasm and interest in the topic and the students. Use effective communication strategies such as eye contact and body language in providing information and feedback to each student. Accurately communicate skills and concepts related to ESL by providing sufficient demonstration and practice. Use computers and other technologies to enhance professional productivity and support instruction. KTS 6 Understand and apply grammar practice computer software. VIII. CONTENT OUTLINE: Course Assignments/Assessments will include 1. Online Participation/Homework Students will be graded on their ability to ask pertinent questions and critically discuss issues related to the learning activities in their blogs. Homework assignments will be posted each week and will either involve reflecting on questions related to that week s chapter or engaging in a collaborative discussion. Online participation is mandatory. 2. Observations The student will participate in 6 hours of site-based classroom observation of ESL children and youth. The student will assist an experienced classroom teacher by working with small groups that include at least one ELL student within the classroom. Practice will be provided in observing, recording and analyzing the classroom environment, instruction, and teacher/student interactions. The following elements are expected in the report: 43. Place/Institution where you observed the classes 44. Instructor(s) 45. What you did in addition to observing 46. Students age. Proficiency level, and educational background 47. Students academic orientation, if applicable 48. Program/Curriculum orientation 49. Textbook(s) being used 50. Class size 51. Topic(s)/ Skills/Grammatical points covered/lessons objectives 52. How the material is presented 53. How the material is practiced 54. How the feedback is provided 55. Things you like the most about the classes you observed 56. Things that you would do different if you were to teach the classes 15. Any suggestions for the instructor and others in this class 58

59 This will fulfill 6 hours of the 30-hour field experience required for students seeking endorsement from the state of Kentucky. Students who will be doing or have done the Ukraine practicum will be exempted. 3. Mid-term project The students will conduct a series of 3 observations related to first language acquisition. Analysis and findings will be discussed in a paper (3 to 5 pages in length). 4. Final Research Project There will be a final research paper (6 to 8 pages in length) analyzing an English grammar topic (as relates to an EFL/ESL classroom) or a topic related to linguistics. Grading Scale: A = % B = 80-89% C = 70-79% D = 60-69% F = below 60% BOOK LIST Bassano, S. and Christison, M.A (1995b). Community spirit: A practical guide to collaborative language learning. San Francisco, CA: Alta Book Center. Blumenthel, Joseph C. (1981) English 3200 A Programmed course in Grammar and Usage. Hartcourt Brace Jovanich Inc. * Bryson, Bill. (1990) The Mother Tongue English and How It Got That Way. Morrow.* Celce-Murcia, Marianne/ Diane Larsen-Freeman. (1999) The Grammar Book. An ESL/EFL Teachers Course. Heinle & Heinle. * Chapelle, C. (2001). Computer applications in second language acquisition. New York: Cambridge University Press.* Choy, Penelope/ McCormick, James. (1985) Basic Grammar and Usage. Hartcourt Brace Jovanich Publishers.* Crookall, D., and Oxford, R., eds., (1990). Simulation, gaming, and language learning. New York: Newbury House. Diaz-Rico, L. and Weed, K. (2002). The Crosscultural, language, and academic development handbook (2d ed.) Boston: Allyn and Bacon.* Ellis, R. (1997). Second language acquisition. Oxford: Oxford University.* ESL Standards for Pre-K-12 Students. (1997). Alexandria, VA TESOL. * 59

60 Freedman, S., ed. (1989). The Acquisition of Written Language: Response and Revision. Norwood, NJ: Ablex. Fu, Danling. (1995) My Trouble Is My English Asian Students and the American Dream. Boynton/Cook.* Gardner, David, & Lindsay Miller, eds.. (1996) Tasks for Independent Language Learning. Alexandria, VA: TESOL. * Gebhard, Jerry G. (1996) Teaching English as A Foreign or Second Language. The University of Michigan Press. * Gesteland, Richard. (1999) Cross-Cultural Business Behavior: Marketing, Negotiating and Managing Across Cultures. Copenhagen Business School. * Gibson, Robert. (2002). Intercultural Business Communication. Oxford University Press.* Horwitz, E., and Young, D. (1991). Language anxiety: From theory and research to classroom implications. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall. Integrating the ESL Standards into Classroom Practice (2000)* Kreefi-Peyton Joy. (1990) Dialogue Journal : Writing with Nonnative English Speakers. A Handbook For Teachers. * Larsen-Freeman, D. (1995) On the teaching and learning of grammar: Challenging the myths. In F. Eckman et al., eds., Second language acquisition theory and pedagogy. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbraum. Le Master, Jordan. (1980) Making Sense Of Grammar. Teachers College Press.* Lee, W. R. (1986). Language Teaching Games and Contests. Oxford University Press.* Leki, Ilona. (1992) Understanding ESL writers; A Guide for Teachers. Boyton/Cook Publishers.* Lewis, G. and Bedson, G. (1999). Games for children. Oxford, England: Oxford University.* Lightbown, P. and Spada, N. (1999). How languages are learned, 2d edition. Oxford: Oxford University.* McCallum, George P. (1980). 101 Word Games. Oxford University Press.* 60

61 Morgan, Brian. (1998) The ESL Classroom: Teaching, Critical Practice, and Community Development. University of Toronto. * Newwirk, Thomas. (1986) To Compose: Teaching English in the High School. Heinemann.* Richards, Jack C. (1996) Functional English Grammar: An Introduction for Second Language Teachers. Cambridge University Press.* Romaine, Suzanne. (1992) The Cambridge History of English Language Vol. 4. Cambridge University Press.* Schoenberg, Irene E. (1994) Focus on Grammar. Addison-Wesley Publishing Company.* Schram-Pfeazar, Betty. (1996) Basic English Grammar. Pretince Hall Regents.* Shameem, Nikhat & Makhan Tickoo, eds., (1999). New Ways in Using Communicative Games in Language Teaching. Alexandria, VA: TESOL. * Snow, Marguerite, ed. (2000). Implementing the ESL Standards for Pre-K-12 Students Through Teacher Education. Arlington, VA TESOL. * Spratt, Mary. (1994) English for the Teacher. Cambridge University Press.* Trudgill, Peter and Hannah, Jean. (1985) International English: A Guide to Varieties of Standard English. Edward Arnold.* Warschauer, Mark, Heidi Shetzer, & Christine Meloni. (2000). Internet for English Teaching. Alexandria, VA: TESOL.* Watkins/Dillingham/Hiers. (1986) Practical English Workbook. Houghton Mifflin Company.* Weaver, Constance. (1996) Teaching Grammar In Context. Boyton/Cook Publishers.* Williams, James D. (1999) The Teacher Grammar Book. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.* Willis/Quinn. (1983) Basic Usage, Vocabulary and Composition. Holt, Rinehart and Winston.* Windeatt, S., Hardisty, D., and Eastment, D. (2000). The Internet. New York: Oxford University Press.* 61

62 Campbellsville University School of Education TSL ED 460 TESL Methods and Materials for P-12 Teaching Professor: Erin Holmes Address: 1 University Dr. UPO 928 Campbellsville, KY Phone: School of Education Model Empowerment for Learning I. REQUIRED TEXTS: Teaching by Principles: an interactive approach, Brown, H.D. Pearson Longman, II. III. COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course will use knowledge derived from the linguistic sciences about the nature of language and how it is learned, to assist preservice and currently practicing teachers in the exploration and evaluation of the various methods, techniques and approaches to the teaching of English as a Second Language, and in the development of skills, procedures, and strategies for teaching from and utilizing commercial materials and developing teacher-made materials for teaching English as a Second Language. SCHOOL OF EDUCATION MISSION STATEMENT: 62

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