HIST 294 DEB Introduction to the Historian s Craft

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1 Columbia College Online Campus P a g e 1 HIST 294 DEB Introduction to the Historian s Craft Spring Session, March 16 May 2015 Course Description Designed for the history major or minor, but open to non-majors as well, this course provides hands-on exploration of history and gives students a broad foundation in learning how to think and work as historians. Topics include the assessment of issues such as the causes of events and the reliability of evidence. Students will learn how to critically analyze primary and sources and use a variety of approaches to history, including oral history, quantitative history and digital history. As a central project, students will craft a research proposal as a solid foundation for more advanced work in the history major/minor. Completion with a grade of C or higher is required. Prerequisite: A minimum of six hours of History at the 100 level Proctored Tests: Midterm and Final Textbooks Gilderhus, Mark T. History and Historians: A Historiographical Introduction, 7th edition (Upper Saddle River, New Jersey: Prentice Hall, 2010) ISBN: Hoefferle, Caroline. The Essential Historiography Reader (Boston: Prentice Hall, 2011) ISBN: Salevouris, Michael J., with Conal Furay. The Methods and Skills of History: A Practical Guide, 4th edition (Malden, MA: John Wiley and Sons, 2015). ISBN: Please note that this is a workbook that must be purchased new in the most recent, fourth, edition. Turabian, Kate. A Manual for Writers of Term Papers, Theses, and Dissertations, 8th edition (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2013) ISBN: Williams, Robert C. The Historian s Toolbox: A Student s Guide to the Theory and Craft of History, 3rd edition (Armonk, New York: M.E. Sharpe, 2013). ISBN: Textbooks for the course may be ordered from MBS Direct. You can order online at (be sure to select Online Education rather than your home campus before selecting your class) by phone at For additional information about the bookstore, visit Course Overview This course provides hands-on exploration of history and gives students a broad foundation in learning how to think and work as historians. Topics include major trends in historical scholarship, the assessment of issues such as causes of events, the reliability of evidence, and different theoretical schools of history. As a

2 Columbia College Online Campus P a g e 2 central project, students will craft a research proposal as a solid foundation for more advanced work in the history major or minor. There are two basic components to this course. The first is an introduction to historiography, the history of historical writing. Understanding how people have written about the past and how that has changed over time is critical to understanding cultures and to doing historical research. The second component of the course is a study of the research methods and skills historians use, including critical reading, asking historical questions, finding historical sources, and writing about history. HIST 294 is designed to equip you to complete quality research projects in history electives and to write the senior thesis in the capstone course, HIST 494. It is recommended that you take this course in your second year of study after having completed at least two of the survey courses in American History, World History, or Western Civilization. Technology Requirements Participation in this course will require the basic technology for all online classes at Columbia College: A computer with reliable Internet access, A web browser, Acrobat Reader, Microsoft Office or another comparable word processor (doc, docx or rtf only) You can find more details about standard requirements for our courses on our site. Familiarize yourself with the D2L environment and the syllabus. Particularly review the Content, Discussions, and Checklist areas of the course. Course Objectives To think seriously and systematically about history as a discipline shaped by many and often contradictory concerns. To analyze a selection of significant historical writings culled from the works of ancient, medieval and/or modern historians. To master the knowledge, theories and skills for researching a historical topic. Measurable Learning Outcomes Know about the scholarly literature of American and world history. Criticize a major school of history and its approach to historical methods. Summarize the best practices of great historians in the past and in the present. Identify appropriate primary sources on a historical topic. Detect assumptions, bias, and opinions in source materials on controversial issues in the past. Produce a literature review and a research prospectus using the Chicago Style. Evaluate the strengths and the weaknesses of a historical field of inquiry. Describe and explain an essential question for historical research. Grading

3 Columbia College Online Campus P a g e 3 Grading Scale GRADE POINTS PERCENT A 900-1, B C D F Grade Weights ASSIGNMENT POINTS PERCENT Discussions Research Project Design Annotated Bibliography Historiographical Essay Research Proposal Research Skills Labs Midterm Exam Final Exam Total Schedule of Due Dates WEEK ASSIGNMENT POINTS DUE 1 Weekly Focus Discussion (check requirements in the Assignment Overview Discussions) Workbook Exercises Discussion (check requirements in the Assignment Overview Discussions) 20 Friday/Sunday 15 Friday/Sunday Research Skills Lab Topics & Research Questions 30 Sunday 2 Weekly Focus Discussion 15 Friday/Sunday Workbook Exercises Discussion 15 Friday/Sunday Research Discussion--Topics 10 Friday/Sunday Research Skills Lab Libraries & Research 30 Sunday 3 Weekly Focus Discussion 15 Friday/Sunday Research Discussion Research Questions 15 Friday/Sunday Research Skills Lab Citations 30 Sunday 4 Weekly Focus Discussion 20 Friday/Sunday Workbook Discussion 15 Friday/Sunday Research Skills Lab Secondary Sources 30 Sunday Midterm Exam 100 Sunday 5 Weekly Focus Discussion 20 Friday/Sunday Workbook Discussion 15 Friday/Sunday Research Skills Lab Primary Sources 30 Sunday Annotated Bibliography 50 Sunday 6 Weekly Focus Discussion 20 Friday/Sunday Research Skills Lab Non-Print Sources 30 Sunday

4 Columbia College Online Campus P a g e 4 Historiographical Essay 100 Sunday 7 Weekly Focus Discussion 20 Friday/Sunday Workbook Discussion 15 Friday/Sunday Research Skills Lab History for the Masses 30 Sunday 8 Weekly Focus Discussion 20 Friday/Saturday Research Skills Lab History in Film & Fiction 40 Saturday Research Proposal 100 Saturday Final Exam 150 Saturday Assignment Overview Discussions: Weekly discussion posts are objective academic exercises. Your postings should be original, relevant observations of the assigned topic(s). You are expected to read ALL the posts of your fellow classmates and respond to at least one other student posting in each discussion topic each week. Simply rephrasing another student s post is not acceptable. All responses should be original and relevant to the assigned topic. Discussion postings are formal writing, therefore they should be intelligible and effectively communicate your ideas, as well as following the rules of English including capitalization, spelling, sentence structure and paragraphs. Discussion posts are d into three discussion topics based on type: Weekly Focus, Workbook Exercises, and Research. You must participate in all discussion topics in order to receive full credit, and your participation will be considered holistically by the instructor. The total possible points available for participating in the weekly Discussions during the session is 250. The key to these posts is quality, NOT quantity! While you have until 11:59pm CT Sunday from Weeks 1 to 7 to participate, initial posts are due before midnight on Fridays and all responses and replies are due before midnight on Sunday. For Week 8, initial posts are due Friday and all replies and responses are due before midnight on Saturday. You are required to read ALL postings in all Discussions (Weekly Focus, Workbook and Research); you are required to respond to at least one initial post offered by your colleagues and to reply to every response to your own posts. Discussion posts will be graded according to the following criteria: Posts are submitted in a timely manner (initial posts are due Friday night and all replies and responses are due Sunday night). Posts fully address all of the questions. Posts are well written, and free from grammatical errors and formal (Turabian is the guide). Posts utilize and cite the assigned materials, following the standards of the Chicago Style Manual as interpreted by Turabian. Student responds to at least one other student posting in each discussion topic, and replies to ALL responses to his or her initial posts. Student reads all postings by other students and instructor.

5 Columbia College Online Campus P a g e 5 Research Skills Labs: Each week there will be a set of readings and an assignment that will help you build your research skills. Assignments vary by week and are tied to the skill set for that week. Assignments include workbook exercises, online library work, and essays. All assignments, except for the final one, are worth 30 points. The Week 8 assignment is worth 40 points. There is a total of 250 points possible for the research skills lab assignments. Reading assignments in the Course Schedule below that are related to the Skills Labs are noted with (SL). Research Project Design: Over the eight weeks of this session you will select a research topic and complete a variety of assignments related to that topic which will culminate in a written research proposal. The project design includes selection of a topic, writing of research questions, compilation of an annotated bibliography, a historiographical essay and the final research proposal. There is a total of 250 points possible for the assignments that are a part of the research project design. These are formal writing assignments that should be the Chicago Style (Turabian). Be sure to follow the Expectations for Formal Writing Assignments, located under Resources in the Course Content. Exams: There are two exams in this course, a midterm and a final. The midterm exam is worth 100 points and the final exam is worth 150 points. Each exam will consist of three parts: fill in the blank, short answer and essay. Please refer to the Study Guides located under Resources in the Course Content. Course Schedule Week 1 History and the Historian s Craft Activities: Research Skills Lab 1 Topics & Research Questions: Read the information posted in the Research Skills Lab section for Week One (the reading assignment/s designated with the (SL)). Identify three potential research topics you might like to explore for your research plan in this class. One must be an American History topic; one must be a European history topic; one must be a World History topic (Africa, Asia, Latin America not the United States, Western Europe, or Russia). For each topic explain what specifics you might research and what a good research question related to that topic would be. For each of your proposed topics, answer each of the questions about Choosing a Good Paper Topic listed in Chapter 8 of The Historian s Toolbox, and assign your topic a score of 1-10 (one being worst, ten being best). Explain your overall rating (out of 100) for each of your proposed topics. This is a formal writing assignment that is submitted to the Dropbox. Please note that you must first successfully complete the Plagiarism Tutorial (Course Content) and the Plagiarism Quiz (Quizzes) BEFORE you will be able to submit this assignment to the Dropbox. Proctor Information: Please read How to Submit Proctor Information topic in the Proctoring Information section of the Content area. Fill out the Student Proctor Information Form and submit it to the Proctor Information Dropbox by the end of Week 2. Reading Assignments: The Methods and Skills of History o Chapter 1, The Uses of History o Chapter 2, The Nature of History The Historian s Toolbox o Chapter 8, Doing History: An Overview (pp ) (SL) o Chapter 14, Everyday History (pp ) The Essential Historiography Reader o Introduction (pp. 1-14) History and Historians o Chapter 1, Aims and Purposes (pp. 1-11)

6 Columbia College Online Campus P a g e 6 Discussions: Discussion topics are listed under the Week 1 forum. Initial discussion posts are due midnight Friday and the required replies and responses are due midnight Sunday (this is the case for every weekly Discussion). Be sure to review the guidelines on page four of the Course Syllabus. Introductions: To get started with the course, post a message in the Introductions topic. As with every discussion, you are expected to make your initial submission before midnight on Friday. Between Friday and the end of the course week at midnight on Sunday night, students are expected to read the submissions of their classmates, comment on at least one such submission and reply to all responses to their initial submissions. Weekly Focus Questions: Please respond to the posted focus questions, read the work of your classmates, comment on at least one other student s posting and reply to all responses to your initial post. What are the various ways that we can define history? How and why can the definition of history change? Workbook Exercises Questions: Please read the assigned chapters in The Methods and Skills of History and complete the assigned workbook exercises, then post your answers to the assigned exercises, read the work of your classmates, comment on at least one other student s posting and reply to all responses to your initial post. Complete Exercises A1 & A2 in Chapter 1 and Exercises B1 & B2 in Chapter 2. Week 2 Historical Thinking Activities: Research Skills Lab 2 Libraries & Research: Read the assignment for the Research Skills Lab section for Week Two. Complete the Set A exercises in Chapter 7 of The Methods and Skills of History. Type your answers into a word document and upload it to the appropriate Dropbox. Please note that the Proctor Information Form for the Midterm and Final Examinations must be submitted to its folder in the Dropbox BEFORE it is possible to submit this assignment to the appropriate folder in the Dropbox. Proctor Information: Please read How to Submit Proctor Information topic in the Proctoring Information section of the Content area. Fill out the Student Proctor Information Form and submit it to the Proctor Information Dropbox by the end of Week 2. Please note that the Proctor Information Form for the Midterm and Final Examinations must be submitted to its folder in the Dropbox BEFORE it is possible to submit Research Skills Lab 2 to the appropriate folder in the Dropbox. Reading Assignments: The Methods and Skills of History o Chapter 3, Historical Thinking: Continuity and Change o Chapter 4, Historical Thinking: Multiple Causality o Chapter 5, Historical Thinking: Context o Chapter 6, Historical Writing: Telling a Story o Chapter 7, Libraries: Real and Virtual (SL) The Historian s Toolbox o Part I: The Craft of History (pp. 3-46) o Chapter 11, Narrative and Explanation (pp ) Discussions: Discussion topics are listed under the Week 2 forum. Initial discussion posts are due by midnight Friday and all replies and responses are due midnight Sunday. Weekly Focus Questions: Please post your response to the focus questions, comment on at least one other student s posting and reply to all responses to your initial post. How does each of the following impact historical thinking: continuity and change, causality, and context? Why is writing history considered a craft? What skills are necessary to be a good historian? Workbook Exercises Questions: Please read the assigned chapters in The Methods and Skills of History and complete the assigned workbook exercises, then post your answers, comment on at

7 Columbia College Online Campus P a g e 7 least one other student s posting and reply to all responses to your initial post. Complete exercises A & B in Chapter 3, A1 & A2 in Chapter 4, and A1 & B1 in Chapter 5. Research Topics: Post a description of the historical topic you plan to research for this course. Your description should include information about the topic, why you chose this topic, and, in particular, ways that could further define and narrow your topic. You must comment on at least one other student s posting and reply to all responses to your initial post. Please note that you must receive approval of your topic from the instructor before completing any future assignments related to the research project. This is a formal writing assignment. Please refer to the Guidelines for Formal Writing, located in the Course Content under Re Week 3 Historiography The Ancients to the Early Modern Period Activities: Research Skills Labs 3 Citations: Read the assigned Research Skills Lab assignment for this week and complete the following assignment. For each of the sources in the Exercises listed below write a sentence about that requires and includes a footnote at the end of the sentence and a formatted footnote at the bottom of the page. You must also complete a formatted bibliography listing all of the sources cited by you in this assignment. Please refer to Turabian s Manual (Chaps ) to be sure that you are formatting and inserting the footnotes (bibliography-style) into your document. Your sentences, citations and bibliography should then be uploaded to the appropriate Dropbox. Related to formatting footnotes and bibliographic citations in the Chicago Style (Turabian), this should be handled as a formal writing assignment and follow the guidelines for formal writing assignments located in the Course Content. For Set A Exercise 1 in Chapter 7 you need to have 5 footnotes. For each of the topics (World War I, Nat Turner, Women s Suffrage, the Collapse of the Soviet Union, and the Bubonic Plague) you should identify 1 book to use as your source for that sentence. For Set A Exercise 2 in Chapter 7 you should write a sentence and footnote for each of the 9 sources you identified in this exercise. For Set A Exercise 3 in Chapter 7 you should write a sentence and footnote for each of the websites you identified one good site and one unreliable site. (Turabian has examples of formatted footnotes and bibliographic citations for online materials in Chapter 17) For Set A Exercise 4 in Chapter 7 you should find one peer-reviewed journal article from either Project Muse or JStor (both are available through the library website under the databases listing) about each topic (Civil Rights Movement, Elizabeth I, Alcohol or the Temperance Movement in America, and the Renaissance). For each of the articles you should write a brief sentence describing the article s content, cite the article in the footnote at the end of that sentence, and include the article in the bibliography at the end of the assignment. Reading Assignments: The Methods and Skills of History o Chapter 14, The History of History (NOTE: You do not have to complete the workbook exercise for this chapter) The Essential Historiography Reader o Chapter 1, Early Histories (pp ) o Chapter 2, The Evolution of Modern History: (pp ) History and Historians o Chapter 2, The Beginnings of Historical Consciousness (pp ) The Historian s Toolbox o Chapter 10, Credit and Acknowledgment (pp ) (SL)

8 Columbia College Online Campus P a g e 8 Discussions: Discussion topics are listed under the Week 3 forum. Initial discussion posts are due by midnight Friday and all replies and responses are due midnight Sunday. Weekly Focus Questions: What were the major characteristics of each type of history: mythopoetic and Greek? How were they alike? Different? What were the major characteristics of Christian historiography in its beginning and throughout the Renaissance and Early Modern Period? Explain the contributions of one major Christian historian during this time. How did the Scientific Revolution change the writing of history? Research Research Questions: In one to two pages, further define your proposed Research Project and develop two or three research questions that you plan to explore as part of your research proposal. You must comment on at least one other student s posting, read the submissions of your classmates and reply to all responses to your own initial post. This is a formal writing assignment. Week 4 Nineteenth-Century Historiography Activities: Research Skills Lab 4 Secondary Sources: Read the information posted in the Research Skills Lab for Week 4 and complete the assignment noted there. See the Secondary Sources Research Skills Assignment Sheet for the specific details of this assignment. It is located in the Course Content under Week 4. Midterm Exam: Please complete the Midterm exam by midnight Sunday. Be sure you have an appointment (2 hours) with your proctor to take the Midterm. The test will cover all assigned material from the start of Week 1 through the end of Week 4. The Midterm Study Guide is located under Resources in the Course Content. Reading Assignments: The Methods and Skills of History o Chapter 8, Reading History (SL) The Essential Historiography Reader o Chapter 3, Nineteenth-Century European Historiography (pp ) o Chapter 4, American History in the Nineteenth Century (pp ) History and Historians o Chapter 3, Historical Consciousness in the Modern Age (pp ) o Chapter 4, Philosophy of History: Speculative Approaches (pp ) The Historian s Toolbox o Chapter 12, Interpretation (pp ) (SL) Discussions: Discussion topics are listed under the Week 4 forum. Initial discussion posts are due by midnight Friday and all replies and responses are due midnight Sunday. Weekly Focus Questions: Briefly explain the major points and one major author in each of the following historiographical schools: Marxism, Romanticism, Empiricism. How were American historians impacted by these schools of history? Which do you believe is the best approach to writing history? Why? Workbook Exercises Questions: Please read the assigned chapters in The Methods and Skills of History and complete the assigned workbook exercises, then post your answers to the appropriate Discussion. Complete exercises A1 and A2 in Chapter 8. Week 5 Twentieth-Century Historiography Activities: Research Skills Lab 5 Primary Sources: Read the information posted in the Research Skills Lab section for Week Five (found under Week 5 in the Course Content) and complete the assignment noted there. See the Primary Sources Research Skills Assignment Sheet for the specific details of this assignment. Submit this assignment to the Dropbox before midnight on Sunday.

9 Columbia College Online Campus P a g e 9 Annotated Bibliography: As part of your research project design you must submit an annotated bibliography that includes 10 sources (6 books and 4 peer-reviewed journal articles) and 5 primary sources all related to your research topic. Related to the collection and proper formatting of bibliographic citations, this is a formal writing assignment and it is to be submitted to the Dropbox before midnight on Sunday. Reading Assignments: The Methods and Skills of History o Chapter 10, Evidence (SL) The Historian s Toolbox o Chapter 9, Sources and Evidence (pp ) (SL) The Essential Historiography Reader o Chapter 5, Conflict and Consensus (pp ) o Chapter 6, Marxism, Annales, and the New Left (pp ) History and Historians o Chapter 5, Philosophy of History: Analytical Approaches (pp ) Discussions: Discussion topics are listed under the Week 5 forum. Initial discussion posts are due by midnight Friday and all replies and responses are due midnight Sunday. Weekly Focus Questions: Please submit your response to the posted focus questions, read the submissions of your classmates, comment on at least one other student s posting and reply to all responses to your initial post. What was consensus history and why did it become the preferred method in the United States in the mid-twentieth century? How did the new approaches of the Annales school and the New Left challenge consensus history? Workbook Exercises Questions: Please read the assigned chapters in The Methods and Skills of History and complete the assigned workbook exercises, then post your answers to the assigned exercises, read the work of your classmates, comment on at least one other student s posting and reply to all responses to your initial post. Complete exercises A1, A2, A3 and A4 in Chapter 10. Week 6 Varieties of History Activities: Historiographical Essay: As part of your research project design you must submit an historiographical essay. (See Appendix B in The Essential Historiography Reader for an example of an historiographical review essay.) In this paper, you will analyze how and what other historians have argued about your topic. DO NOT focus on your answer to your specific research question! You must explain how historical interpretations on your topic have changed over time and the differences between various schools of historical interpretation regarding your topic. In other words, you are going to compare and contrast what many historians have argued about your topic and try to explain why interpretations have changed. Essays should be six to eight pages in length for the body, must consult a minimum of eight sources and must present and defend a thesis. The thesis is your own main argument about the major trends (patterns) or schools in historical interpretations related to your topic. In defending your thesis, you must present detailed evidence from your These must include identified and cited paraphrases, summaries, and quotations from your You can analyze the development of the historiography on your topic either chronologically or thematically, as long as you trace changes and explain differences in interpretation. You must provide proper footnote citations (and bibliographic citations in the Works Cited list) to all sources quoted, paraphrased, or summarized in your paper (Turabian). Your notes must be precise--they must refer to the specific pages of works that demonstrate the interpretations you are examining in your paper.

10 Columbia College Online Campus P a g e 10 Reading Assignments: The Historian s Toolbox o Chapter 16, Material Culture (pp ) (SL) o Chapter 19, New Tools: GIS and CSI (pp ) (SL) o Chapter 20, History on the Internet (pp ) (SL) o The Essential Historiography Reader o Chapter 7, New Social History (pp ) o Chapter 8, The Linguistic Turn, Postmodernism, and New Cultural History (pp ) Discussions: Discussion topics are listed under the Week 6 forum. Initial discussion posts are due by midnight Friday and all replies and responses are due midnight Sunday. Weekly Focus Questions: Please post your response to the posted focus questions, comment on at least one other student s posting and reply to all responses to your initial post. How did the events of the 1960s and 1970s impact the emergence of the New Social History? How is the new social history an outgrowth of the New Left? In what ways do postmodernism and the new cultural history both build on and challenge the new social history? Research Skills Lab 6 Non-Print Sources: Read the information posted in the Research Skills Lab section for Week 6 and complete the assignment noted there. Post your work before midnight Friday and then read the work of your classmates, comment on at least one other student s posting and reply to all responses to your initial posting before the Sunday night deadline. Complete the Task assigned at the end of Chapter 16 in The Historian s Toolbox. Take a picture of your object, and write your answers to these questions in a 2-3 paragraph essay. Post your picture and answer to the discussion thread so that the class can read about the range objects the class selected to analyze. Course Evaluations: Please evaluate the course. You will be able to submit your course evaluation between Sunday of Week 5 and Thursday of Week 7. A link will be sent to your CougarMail that will allow you to access the evaluation. Week 7 History in the Academy Activities: Research Skills Lab 7 History for the Masses: Read the Skills Lab assignment for Week 7 located under Week 7 of the Course Content. Visit the Smithsonian Institutes website, and select one of their Online Exhibitions to review. Visit the exhibit web site and thoroughly explore all of the displays and topics available on the website. After your visit to the exhibit, write a 2-3 page essay that reviews the exhibit. Your essay should fully describe the exhibit (be sure to include the full title of the exhibit), its main points and the types of primary and sources used in the exhibit. How effective is this exhibit at telling the history it is relating to the public? Is this an effective way to present history to the masses? Why or why not? Submit your work to the Dropbox, Week 7. Course Evaluations: Please evaluate the course. You will be able to submit your course evaluation between Sunday of Week 5 and Thursday of Week 7. A link will be sent to your CougarMail that will allow you to access the evaluation. Reading Assignments: The Methods and Skills of History o Chapter 11, Oral Histories, Statistics, and Photographs (SL) o Chapter 15, History and the Disciplines The Historian s Toolbox o Chapter 15, Oral History (pp ) (SL) o Chapter 17, Public History (pp ) (SL) o Chapter 18, Event Analysis (pp ) (SL)

11 Columbia College Online Campus P a g e 11 Discussions: Discussion topics are listed under the Week 7 forum. Initial Discussion posts are due by midnight Friday and all replies and responses are due before midnight Sunday. Weekly Focus Questions: Please post your response to the posted focus questions, read the work of your classmates, comment on at least one other student s posting and reply to all responses to your initial post. What are the benefits and challenges of the oral history method? What relationship does history have with other disciplines, especially the social sciences? How would you defend the need for history courses as part of the general education curriculum in a college and the need for a history major at a liberal arts college? Workbook Exercises Questions: Please read the assigned chapters in The Methods and Skills of History and complete the assigned workbook exercises, then post your answers to the assigned exercises to the appropriate Discussion thread, comment on at least one other student s posting and reply to all responses to your initial post. Complete exercises A1 and A2 in Chapter 11 and exercises 1, 2 and 3 in Chapter 15. Week 8 The Historical Profession Today Activities: Research Proposal: You will write a brief research proposal; you should aim for 6-7 pages (not counting the bibliography). In that 6-7 pages you must explain the general area of history addressed by your research; (e.g., the history of the Great Depression in the United States); your specific research topic (e.g., ethnic and religious tensions in Pennsylvania mining communities towns during strikes labor conflicts in the 1930s); the precise questions you will address in your research (e.g., did employers manipulate such tensions as an anti-union strategy, and did union organizers try to build multi-ethnic/multi-religious alliances); how your question relates to issues raised/discussed by other historians who have worked on similar/related topics; why this question is worth answering from an historian's viewpoint; what primary sources you will use to answer this question; and what methods of analysis you will use to draw answers out of the primary The proposal is due Friday night in the appropriate Week 8 Discussion topic and all replies and responses assessing your work are due before midnight Saturday. Finally, please upload a copy of your work to the Dropbox before midnight Saturday. Final Exam: Please complete the Final exam by midnight Saturday. Contact your proctor to set up a place and time to sit for the test. Your proctor will have already received the access password. The test will cover all material from the start of Week 5 through the end of Week 8. There is a Study Guide for the Final Exam under Resources in the Course Content. Reading Assignments: The Methods and Skills of History o Chapter 9, History on Film (SL) The Historian s Toolbox o Chapter 13, Speculation (pp ) (SL) o The Essential Historiography Reader o Chapter 9, World Histories (pp ) o Epilogue, Recent Trends in the Historical Profession (pp ) o History and Historians o Chapter 6, Professional History in Recent Times (pp ) o Chapter 7, Postscript: Culture Wars, Postmodernism, and Other Issues (pp ) Discussions: All discussions take place in the Discussions area of the course. Initial discussion posts are due by midnight Friday and all replies and responses are due before midnight Saturday. Weekly Focus Questions: Please post your response to the posted focus questions, comment on at least one other student s posting and reply to all responses to your initial post. How have studies of world history changed since the mid-twentieth century? What have been the major

12 Columbia College Online Campus P a g e 12 factors that prompted these changes? Discuss the biggest challenges facing historians in today s world? Workbook Exercises Questions: Research Skills Lab 8 History in Film & Fiction: Read the Skills Lab assignment for Week 8. Watch the video The Witness: From the Balcony of Room 306 and write an essay that answers all of the questions from the Chapter 9 workbook exercises in The Methods and Skills of History on page Submit your initial work to the proper Discussion topic before the Friday night deadline, then read the work of your classmates, comment on at least one other student s posting and reply to all responses to your initial post before the end of the course on Saturday night. Course Policies Student Conduct All Columbia College students, whether enrolled in a land-based or online course, are responsible for behaving in a manner consistent with Columbia College's Student Conduct Code and Acceptable Use Policy. Students violating these policies will be referred to the office of Student Affairs and/or the office of Academic Affairs for possible disciplinary action. The Student Code of Conduct and the Computer Use Policy for students can be found in the Columbia College Student Handbook. The Handbook is available online; you can also obtain a copy by calling the Student Affairs office (Campus Life) at The teacher maintains the right to manage a positive learning environment, and all students must adhere to the conventions of online etiquette. Plagiarism Your grade will be based in large part on the originality of your ideas and your written presentation of these ideas. Presenting the words, ideas, or expression of another in any form as your own is plagiarism. Students who fail to give credit for information contained in their written work (papers, journals, exams, etc.) are violating the intellectual property rights of the original author. For proper citation of the original authors, you should reference the appropriate publication manual for your degree program or course (CMS). Violations are taken seriously in higher education and may result in a failing grade on the assignment, a grade of "F" for the course, or dismissal from the College. Collaboration conducted between students without prior permission from the instructor is considered plagiarism and will be treated as such. Spouses and roommates taking the same course should be particularly careful. All required papers may be submitted for textual similarity review to Turnitin.com for the detection of plagiarism. All submitted papers may be included in the Turnitin.com reference database for the purpose of detecting plagiarism. This service is subject to the Terms and Conditions of Use posted on the Turnitin.com site. Non-Discrimination There will be no discrimination on the basis of sex, race, color, national origin, sexual orientation, religion, ideology, political affiliation, veteran status, age, physical handicap, or marital status. Disability Services Students with documented disabilities who may need academic services for this course are required to register with the Coordinator for Disability Services at (573) Until the student has been cleared through the disability services office, accommodations do not have to be granted. If you are a student who has a documented disability, it is important for you to read the entire syllabus before enrolling in the course. The structure or the content of the course may make an accommodation not feasible.

13 Columbia College Online Campus P a g e 13 Online Participation You are expected to read the assigned texts and participate in the discussions course activities each week. Assignments should be posted by the due dates stated on the grading schedule in your syllabus. If an emergency arises that prevents you from participating in class, please let your instructor know as soon as possible. Attendance Policy Attendance for a week will be counted as having submitted a course assignment for which points have been earned during that week of the session or if the proctoring information has been submitted or the plagiarism quiz taken if there is no other assignment due that week. A class week is defined as the period of time between Monday and Sunday (except for Week 8, when the week and the course will end on Saturday at midnight). The course and system deadlines are all based on the Central Time Zone. Cougar All students are provided a CougarMail account when they enroll in classes at Columbia College. You are responsible for monitoring from that account for important messages from the College and from your instructor. You may forward your Cougar account to another account; however, the College cannot be held responsible for breaches in security or service interruptions with other providers. Students should use for private messages to the instructor students. The class discussions are for public messages so the class members can each see what others have to say about any given topic and respond. Late Assignment Policy An online class requires regular participation and a commitment to your instructor and your classmates to regularly engage in the reading, discussion and writing assignments. Although most of the online communication for this course is asynchronous, you must be able to commit to the schedule of work for the class for the next eight weeks. You must keep up with the schedule of reading and writing to successfully complete the class. Tests must be completed according to the course schedule unless an emergency leave is obtained in advance. Late work will not be accepted except in those cases in which the student and the Instructor have made prior agreement, and with the understanding that the score will nevertheless be penalized. Course Evaluation You will have the opportunity to evaluate the course near the end of the session. Course evaluations will open on Sunday of Week 5 and will remain open until Thursday of Week 7. A link will be sent to your CougarMail that will allow you to access the evaluation. Be assured that the evaluations are anonymous and that your instructor will not be able to see them until after final grades are submitted. Proctor Policy Students taking courses that require proctored exams must submit their completed proctor request forms to their instructors by the end of the second week of the session. Proctors located at Columbia College campuses are automatically approved. The use of Proctor U services is also automatically approved. The instructor of each course will consider any other choice of proctor for approval or denial. Additional proctor choices the instructor will consider include: public librarians, high school or college instructors, high school or college counseling services, commanding officers, education service officers, proctoring services. Personal friends, family members, athletic coaches

14 Columbia College Online Campus P a g e 14 and direct supervisors are not acceptable. Additional Resources Orientation for New Students This course is offered online, using course management software provided by Desire2Learn and Columbia College. The Student Manual provides details about taking an online course at Columbia College. You may also want to visit the course demonstration to view a sample course before this one opens. Technical Support If you have problems accessing the course or posting your assignments, contact your instructor, the Columbia College Helpdesk, or the D2L Helpdesk for assistance. Contact information is also available within the online course environment ex Online Tutoring Smarthinking is a free online tutoring service available to all Columbia College students. Smarthinking provides real-time online tutoring and homework help for Math, English, and Writing. The Writing Center can be used for writing assistance in any course. Smarthinking also provides access to live tutorials in writing and math, as well as a full range of study resources, including writing manuals, sample problems, and study skills manuals. You can access the service from wherever you have a connection to the Internet. I encourage you to take advantage of this free service provided by the college. Access Smarthinking through CougarTrack under Students->Academics->Academic Re Grading Criteria Discussions Rubric Discussions Criteria (21-25 pts.) (16-20 pts.) (11-15 pts.) (6-11 pts.) (0-5 pts.) Original Post (20 pts.) Addresses all topics. Reflects a full understanding of all key concepts and questions. Reflects thorough familiarity with the assigned readings. Addresses all topics. Reflects a decent understanding of all key concepts and questions and familiarity with the assigned readings. Connections to Addresses all topics, yet, reflects a partial understanding of the key concepts and questions. Lacks familiarity with the readings. Connections to Does not address all topics. Only briefly touches on one or more elements. Shows lack of understanding of key concepts and little or no Posting is plagiarized or does not address all topics. Reflects little to no effort. Content may be off-topic or only summarizes others' posts.

15 Columbia College Online Campus P a g e 15 Connections to the course material are evident and fully developed. Specific and appropriate examples are used. Cited correctly where appropriate. the course materials and examples are evident, but not fully developed. Cited correctly where appropriate. the course materials and examples are not fully evident. Cited where appropriate, but may not be full citation. familiarity with the readings. Reflects minimal effort and no original insight. Not cited or citations are incorrect. Not cited or citations are incorrect. Response Posts (5 pts.) Responses are substantive and provoke further thought or discussion, providing indepth analysis or application of the concepts and questions. Responds to at least one classmate in each topic. Reads all of other students postings. Response posts show insight and analysis, but are not fully developed. Viewpoints are expressed but lack elaboration and detail. Offers some new line of thinking. Responds to at least one classmate in each topic. Reads most of other students postings. Response posts are simple, but show some insight and analysis. Viewpoints are not expressed and overall the posting lacks detail. Responds to at least one classmate in each topic. Reads an adequate number of other students postings. Response is vague and does not address readings. Does not express a position clearly. Lacks insight and analysis. Posts do not inspire further thinking. Does not respond to a classmate in each topic. Reads little to none of other students postings. Posting is plagiarized or no response posting is given for each topic. Posting consist of Good idea or I agree. Does not inspire further thinking. Skills Lab Assignments Rubric Research Skills Lab Assignments Criteria Content (20 points) A (27-30 pts.) fully addresses the question or prompt. demonstrates critical thinking and analysis of the topic. fully utilizes material from the assigned B (24-26 pts.) partially addresses the question or prompt. demonstrates a clear understanding of the material but minimal analysis of the topic. C (21-23 pts.) refers to the question or prompt. does not demonstrate a clear understanding of the material and lacks analysis. D (18-20 pts.) does not include material relevant to the question or prompt. demonstrates a lack of understanding of the material. F (0-17 pts.) does not answer the assigned question or prompt. is plagiarized.

16 Columbia College Online Campus P a g e 16 Writing (5 points) readings and sources as evidence. Paragraphs are unified, coherent, and effective, with transitions between ideas. Sentences are correctly constructed, logical, and complete. Incorporates an introduction, body, and conclusion. Avoids spelling errors, and other mistakes. refers to material from the assigned readings as sources but does not adequately analyze them as evidence. Shows organization through a logical progression of ideas and fairly sophisticated transitional devices. May contain a few errors such as spelling errors, and other mistakes that do not impede overall understanding. mentions assigned readings and May list ideas or arrange them randomly rather than using clear logical structure. Usually contains mechanical errors, such as spelling errors, mistakes which are confusing but do not impede overall understanding. does not refer to assigned readings and May have random organization. Usually contains many mechanical errors such as spelling errors, mistakes or few major errors that impede reader's understanding and ability to see idea progression. Lacks organization. Contains many mechanical errors or few major errors such as spelling errors, mistakes that block reader's understandin g and ability to recognize connections between thoughts. Citations (3 points) Cites sources sufficiently and appropriately. Chicago Manual of Style is used for all citations and the bibliography. Cites sources appropriately. Uses Chicago Manual of Style. May have a few minor errors, but nothing major. Cites sources using Chicago Manual of Style, but may have some errors in the citation style. May cite sources, but may do so incorrectly. Does not use Chicago Manual of Style or uses it incorrectly. Does not cite Does not use Chicago Manual of Style or uses it incorrectly. Format (2 points) is typed, doublespaced with 1- inch margins and 12-point font and numbered pages. is not regards to font, margins, and page numbers. includes a is not regards to font, margins, and page numbers. includes a is not regards to font, margins, and page numbers. is not regards to font, margins, and page numbers.

17 Columbia College Online Campus P a g e 17 includes a bibliography with primary and sources listed ly (if applicable). bibliography that is not formatted (if applicable). bibliography that is not formatted (if applicable). does not includes a bibliography (if applicable). does not include a bibliography (if applicable). Historiographical Essay Rubric Historiographical Essay Rubric Criteria Content (50 points) A ( points) Paper constructs a thesis statement based upon the Thesis is original and not self-evident. Paper analyzes sources as evidence to support the thesis. B (80-89 points) Paper constructs a thesis statement based upon the Thesis lacks originality. not adequately analyze sources as evidence to support the thesis. C (70-79 points) Paper lacks a clear thesis statement based upon the Thesis lacks originality. not adequately analyze sources as evidence to support the thesis. D (60-69 points) Paper lacks a thesis statement based upon the Thesis lacks originality. not analyze sources as evidence to support the thesis. F (0-59 points) Paper lacks a coherent topic or direction. not include a thesis statement based upon the Thesis lacks originality. not analyze sources as evidence to support the thesis. Paper is plagiarized in part or whole. Writing (25 points) Paragraphs are unified, coherent, and effective, with transitions between ideas. Sentences are correctly constructed, logical, and complete. Shows organization through a logical progression of ideas and fairly sophisticated transitional devices. May contain a few errors such as spelling errors, May list ideas or arrange them randomly rather than using clear logical structure. Usually contains mechanical errors, such as spelling errors, May have random organization. Usually contains many mechanical errors such as spelling errors, Lacks organization. Contains many mechanical errors or few major errors such as spelling errors,

18 Columbia College Online Campus P a g e 18 Incorporates an introduction, body, and conclusion. Avoids spelling errors, mistakes. and other mistakes that do not impede overall understanding. mistakes which are confusing but do not impede overall understanding. mistakes or few major errors that impede reader's understanding and ability to see idea progression. mistakes that block reader's understandin g and ability to recognize connections between thoughts. Sources & Citations (15 points) Paper utilizes a minimum of 8 sources as evidence for the overall argument. Secondary sources are pertinent and critically analyzed. Cites sources sufficiently and appropriately. Chicago Manual of Style is used for all citations and the bibliography. Paper utilizes a minimum of 8 Secondary sources are pertinent but are not critically analyzed as supporting evidence for the overall argument. Cites sources appropriately. Uses Chicago Manual of Style. May have a few minor errors, but nothing major. Paper utilizes fewer than 8 Secondary sources are pertinent but are not critically analyzed as supporting evidence for the overall argument. Cites sources using Chicago Manual of Style, but may have some errors in the citation style. Paper utilizes fewer than 8 Secondary sources are not analyzed as support for the overall argument. May cite sources, but may do so incorrectly. Does not use Chicago Manual of Style or uses it incorrectly. Paper utilizes fewer than 8 Secondary sources are not analyzed as support for the overall argument. Does not cite Does not use Chicago Manual of Style or uses it incorrectly. Format (10 points) Paper is typed, double-spaced with 1-inch margins and 12-point font and numbered pages. Paper includes a title and title page. Paper is a minimum of 8 pages in length. Essay includes a bibliography. Paper is not regards to font, margins, and page numbers. Paper includes a title and title page. Paper is less than 8 pages in length. Paper includes a bibliography that is not formatted. Paper is not regards to font, margins, and page numbers. Paper is less than 8 pages in length. not include a title and/or title page. Paper includes a bibliography that is not Paper is not regards to font, margins, and page numbers. Paper is less than 8 pages in length. not include a title and/or title page. not include a Paper is not regards to font, margins, and page numbers. Paper is less than 8 pages in length. not include a title and/or title page. not include a

19 Columbia College Online Campus P a g e 19 formatted. bibliography. bibliography. Paper is plagiarized in part or whole. Research Proposal Rubric Research Proposal Criteria Content (60 points) A ( points) Proposal explains the general area of history addressed by the research Proposal explains the specific research topic and places it within the general area of history Proposal explains the historiographic al context of the specific research topic. Proposal defines two to three specific research questions. Proposal addresses why the specific topic is of historical interest and significance. Proposal addresses what primary sources will be used. B (80-89 points) Proposal explains the general area of history addressed by the research Proposal explains the specific research topic and places it within the general area of history Proposal explains the historiographical context of the specific research topic. not clearly define two to three specific research questions. not adequately addresses why the specific topic is of historical interest and significance. not adequately addresses what primary sources will be used. not adequately consider the C (70-79 points) not adequately explain the general area of history addressed by the research not adequately explain the specific research topic and place it within the general area of history not explain the historiographic al context of the specific research topic. not clearly define two to three specific research questions. not adequately addresses why the specific topic is of historical interest and significance. D (60-69 points) not adequately explain the general area of history addressed by the research not explain the specific research topic and place it within the general area of history not explain the historiographi cal context of the specific research topic. not define two to three specific research questions. not address why the specific topic is of historical interest and significance. F (0-59 points) not explain the general area of history addressed by the research not place the specific research topic within the general area of history or fully explain its historiographi cal context. not define two to three specific research questions. not address why the specific topic is of historical interest and significance. not address what primary sources will be used. not consider the methods

20 Columbia College Online Campus P a g e 20 Writing (20 points) Proposal considers the methods of analysis that will be used to draw answers out of the primary Paragraphs are unified, coherent, and effective, with transitions between ideas. Sentences are correctly constructed, logical, and complete. Incorporates an introduction, body, and conclusion. Avoids spelling errors, mistakes. methods of analysis that will be used to draw answers out of the primary Shows organization through a logical progression of ideas and fairly sophisticated transitional devices. May contain a few errors such as spelling errors, and other mistakes that do not impede overall understanding. not adequately address what primary sources will be used. not adequately consider the methods of analysis that will be used to draw answers out of the primary May list ideas or arrange them randomly rather than using clear logical structure. Usually contains mechanical errors, such as spelling errors, mistakes which are confusing but do not impede overall understanding. not address what primary sources will be used. not consider the methods of analysis that will be used to draw answers out of the primary May have random organization. Usually contains many mechanical errors such as spelling errors, mistakes or few major errors that impede reader's understanding and ability to see idea progression. of analysis that will be used to draw answers out of the primary Proposal is plagiarized in part or whole. Lacks organization. Contains many mechanical errors or few major errors such as spelling errors, mistakes that block reader's understandin g and ability to recognize connections between thoughts. Sources & Citations (15 points) Cites sources sufficiently and appropriately. Chicago Manual of Style is used for all citations and the bibliography. Cites sources appropriately. Uses Chicago Manual of Style. May have a few minor errors, but nothing major. Cites sources using Chicago Manual of Style, but may have some errors in the citation style. May cite sources, but may do so incorrectly. Does not use Chicago Manual of Style or uses it incorrectly. Does not cite Does not use Chicago Manual of Style or uses it incorrectly.

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