CHRONIC D ISEASES AND EXERCISE

Save this PDF as:
 WORD  PNG  TXT  JPG

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "CHRONIC D ISEASES AND EXERCISE"

Transcription

1 Chapter 8 CHRONIC D ISEASES AND EXERCISE You will remember from Chapter 4 that having a chronic disease usually doesn t mean that a person can t exercise. If you have a client with a chronic disease, both you and the client need open communication with the client s physician. You need to be sure the disease is stable before prescribing exercise. Suggest that your clients discuss with their doctors the signs and symptoms that indicate trouble during exercise. There was a sample form letter included in Chapter 4 for you to send to the client s physician to disclose your role as a personal trainer. Make sure you ask for the doctor s input about any limitations that might be necessary for that patient. Due to legal issues related to new privacy laws called HIPPA, it might be difficult if not impossible to obtain information from a physician before the client grants permission for disclosure. In other words, the doctor will usually require a written release from the patient before answering your questions. Be aware that the doctor might not know much detail about exercise. Focus your discussion on discovering pertinent information about flare-ups or acute conditions that might limit exercise in this particular situation. Request specific descriptions of signals that would indicate trouble. Depending on the problem and the type of medical treatment that has been administered, there could be an exercise protocol already established by a therapist or physician. ASK FOR IT! The time you take to request this information from both the doctor and the client will not only protect you if a future problem does arise, but it will help you build a rapport with numerous physicians who might make referrals to you in the future. Next we will look at chronic diseases and some of the drugs used to treat these diseases. You will also learn to identify the special concerns related to exercise for each condition. Your goal with new clients will be to work at a very gradual and moderate pace to ease them into their programs regardless of whether they have a special condition or not. This should be an easy task given what you already know about exercise and armed with the information in the next section! SrFit 189

2 ARTHRITIS As you learned in an earlier chapter, arthritis is a general term that refers to many different types of rheumatic diseases. They all cause pain, stiffness, and swelling in the joints and their connective tissue. At this point, we will address the most common forms which are osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. Osteoarthritis is characterized by joint pain but not necessarily inflammation. It is commonly known as wear-and-tear arthritis because it results from a combination of aging, irritation, and abrasion. It is the leading cause of disability in older individuals and typically affects the articular cartilage in the synovial cavities at large, weight-bearing joints. Rheumatoid arthritis, on the other hand, is an inflammatory, multijoint and multisystem disease that affects the cardiac and pulmonary systems as well. It is an autoimmune disorder in which the person s immune system attacks its own cartilage and synovial membranes which leads to the accumulation of synovial fluid within the joint cavity. Thus, it is characterized by acute episodes of joint pain and stiffness. This form of arthritis is usually bilateral which means that if one wrist is affected, the other is also likely to be affected to some degree. Your clients with rheumatoid arthritis will tend to fatigue quickly, so help them pace themselves accordingly. Most of the treatment strategies and exercise guidelines for osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis are similar. No matter how severe their condition, older adults with arthritis need to participate in physical activity programs to prevent further deterioration from the condition. People are often reluctant to begin a program because they are afraid of hurting themselves; they think exercise will do more harm than good. They try to protect their joints by not using them, but this just makes the joints weaker and less flexible. Arthritis is classified into four levels or classes based on its severity. Class 1 means that the person is totally independent with little pain, while Class 4 means they are totally dependent and disabled by pain. You will probably be working with people in the Class 1 and 2 ranges. People in Class 3 and 4 will typically be under the care of a physical therapist. Your clients, especially those with arthritis, need to be taught to distinguish between the different types of pain. We sometimes distinguish pain as bad pain vs. good pain. A better description might be pain vs. soreness. Good pain, or soreness, is felt in the muscle, not in the joint. It stops within a few minutes after exercise ends. There is less soreness associated with each subsequent exercise session. Normally, soreness is what we all experience to some extent when we exercise. Bad pain occurs in or near the joint, continues to hurt after exercise is complete, and does not improve with future sessions. It might even worsen with time. This usually indicates a problem with a joint or a muscle that is not normal. Special concerns: The goal with arthritic clients is to limit progression of the existing damage in the affected joints. Consequently, the focus should be on posture, strength, and flexibility. Do not over-fatigue muscles as this can increase joint pain. Mild isometric exercises are helpful, especially during flare-ups, but remember isometric contractions are contraindicated for people with high blood pressure. SrFit 207

3 Remind your clients to take pain medication about one hour before exercising. Some clients like a hot shower or some other form of heat to loosen up joints before exercise. Others prefer ice for aching joints. Applying an ice pack or other cold compress is probably best after a workout because the cold tends to decrease blood flow to the area which can actually increase the risk for injury during use of the joint. A bag of frozen vegetables makes a good ice pack at the end of a workout. It is flexible, cheap, and reusable. Any exercise that causes pain two hours or more after exercise should be changed or replaced. Discomfort or soreness is okay. PAIN from the exercise itself is NOT okay. Watch carefully for an exercise that is causing increased pain. Clients often won t complain about pain for fear of disappointing you, their trainer. They just get used to it and drive on. No pain, no gain is a WRONG attitude! It should be WHERE THERE IS PAIN, THERE IS NO GAIN! While stretching is extremely important, avoid overstretching. Some clients can hold a stretch for only a few seconds. Always warm up slowly and completely to ensure that the joints are as warm and supple as possible. Do not expect clients to keep joints in the same position for too long. Prolonged stretching of a single joint, or even just holding a joint in one position for too long, can make it difficult to straighten the joint without pain. Use only pain-free range of motion. Stop exercising if PAIN occurs. Daily range of motion exercises, especially first thing in the morning, can really decrease morning stiffness. Help clients design a program to be done at home. Short and frequent exercise sessions are best. Vary endurance and strength training on different days. During acute episodes or flare ups, avoid exercising the affected joint. For strength exercises, use tubing or hand weights with a lower level of resistance. Compensate by doing a higher number of repetitions to fatigue the muscle. It is especially important to choose tubing with a lower resistance because the intensity level increases as the band is stretched. Therefore, the greatest resistance is encountered when the muscle is past its range of mechanical advantage. Try to do range of motion exercises even during a flare up. Some people might never be able to tolerate resistance exercise, but they might be able to tolerate weight bearing exercise. Make sure your client is aware of the mood benefits of exercise. Many people with chronic conditions (especially arthritis) are prone to depression; make certain they know that exercise has been proven to be as effective as medication in fighting depression for most people. 208 SrFit

4 For the client with severe arthritis, water exercise in a pool kept at 90 o will be the best choice, if available. If it is not available, try to find an activity that can be tolerated. For clients who are unable to do continuous activity, try doing a minute or two on one type of machine, rest for 30 seconds, and then switch to another type of machine that uses different joints. Take things slowly and don t forget to provide frequent rest periods. To accommodate these extra rest periods, you might just have to schedule as much as 60 minutes to allow for 30 minutes of work. Remember that the duration and frequency of exercise is more important than the intensity. This is true for everyone, but especially for seniors with arthritis. Many people with arthritis suffer from low back pain. Proceed cautiously, but encourage lower back strengthening exercises. You will learn more in Chapter 9, but remember you want extension, not flexion! LOW BACK PAIN Let s briefly look at back pain and exercise. While back pain is common among all ages, it is often a chronic problem for older persons, especially those with arthritis. It is usually classified as either chronic or acute pain. Chronic pain lasts for longer than three months, and the recommended treatment includes exercise. Acute back pain, on the other hand, lasts less than three months, and the symptoms often clear within a few days to a few weeks when treated with anti-inflammatory drugs and rest. Exercise might or might not be advised for those with acute back pain. Special concerns: If you have clients who have been seeing a physician or therapist, make sure they have been released or cleared for physical activity. Consider secondary conditions like arthritis, heart disease, or osteoporosis when designing a program. Your major goal for a person with back pain should be to prevent overall deconditioning. Be aware that people who have experienced acute episodes might be TERRIFIED of re-injuring their backs. You need to be supportive and understanding. Input from the physician or physical therapist is a good idea when designing low back exercises for anyone suffering from low back pain. Again, make sure the client has been cleared to resume activity and ask if there is already an exercise regimen in place. Remember good pain vs. bad pain. Stay within the client s pain threshold and watch out for sharp pain. Clients who have been in therapy know the warning signs. Have them tell you their guidelines; you can learn a lot of practical information from them that might even apply to other clients with back pain. Aerobic exercise that puts minimal stress on the back is necessary to encourage endurance training. The exact mode of exercise will vary from patient to patient, but a recumbent bike is often a good choice. SrFit 209

5 Strength and flexibility are also important. In the initial stages of exercise, use the abdominal crunch or pelvic tilt to strengthen abs and back extension exercises (but not the Roman Chair) to strengthen the back. If the client has chronic pain but has not been under a doctor s care, these exercises are a good place to begin. If in doubt, use your committee or refer to the appropriate professional. PAIN Years ago, people who were in pain were told to rest, says Edward Laskowski, M.D., a physical medicine and rehabilitation specialist and co-director of the Sports Medicine Center at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. But now we know the exact opposite is true. When you rest, you become deconditioned which may actually contribute to chronic pain. Regular exercise is an all-around weapon in the fight against chronic pain and can: 1. Prompt the body to release endorphins, which are the body's natural pain relievers and help alleviate anxiety and depression. 2. Help build strength and the stronger the muscles, the more force and load that will be taken off bones and cartilage. 3. Increase flexibility to allow joints to move through a full range of motion, which can decrease aches and pains. 4. Improve sleep quality by lowering stress hormones, resulting in better sleep. 5. Boost energy levels, giving a person more energy to cope with chronic pain. 6. Help maintain a healthy weight, which will reduce stress on the joints (weight loss is another way to improve chronic pain). 7. Enhance mood and contribute to an overall sense of well-being. It is not a bad thing (actually it is a very smart thing!) to be concerned about hurting a person who has chronic pain when you are designing an exercise program for them. But, unless the pain they are experiencing is protective pain, a well-designed program will be very beneficial for them. With that said, working with people recovering from injuries, surgery, chronic diseases or undergoing medical rehabilitation demands advanced training. The inexperienced personal trainer (even with a degree), and/or certified personal trainer without advanced training, is not in a position to safely work with at-risk clients and could be vulnerable to costly legal action. And even if you are qualified to work with these clients, you need to make certain that they do not have conditions that need the attention of a physician or other specialist and you also need to verify that the person has been released or cleared for exercise if they have been under the care of a medical professional. Given the flood of at-risk older clients in the fitness setting, trainers must utilize suitable preactivity screening methods to identify members who may need medical clearance and/ or medically supervised programs or a trainer with advanced skills. Studies have shown that more than 25% of all clubs surveyed do not complete preactivity screenings. It is not clear the percentage of personal trainers working independently that do not perform adequate screening prior to working with a new client. Proper screening of a new client is essential in deciding if there are conditions that need to be assessed by a therapist or physi- 210 SrFit

6 cian prior to exercise or if the person needs to be referred to a trainer with more experience than you have. The general exercise guidelines for a client that who has no significant chronic pain, or one with pain who has been released from therapy and is in a stable phase, are much the same as for all older adults. In general: Aerobic exercise. For physical conditioning, start slowly at a safe point for your client's current abilities. Over several months, work up to a regular routine of working out for 20 to 30 minutes, three to five times a week. Low-impact exercise such as biking, the elliptical and walking are often good choices, and swimming may be especially effective for those with joint disease. Strength training. Start with a resistance that allows your client to perform 12 to 15 repetitions and try to work major muscle groups in the upper body, lower body and core. Stretching. Increasing flexibility can be a helpful component of pain relief. Prescribe a consistent stretching routine. Gentle stretching exercises like yoga or body movement exercises such as Pilates are good choices as well. A good rule of thumb for your clients that have chronic aches and pains is to have them keep a journal of what they are feeling and when they are feeling it. If you notice patterns or particular aches after certain types of exercise and after two weeks there is no improvement then you should recommend the client see a physical therapist, orthopedic doctor, or other health professional if they have not done so previously. As you already know, a small amount of muscle soreness one or two days after exercise is normal. Another rule of thumb is to discontinue or modify any exercise that causes pain or increases an already existing pain for more than two hours after the exercise. Your clients, especially those with arthritis, need to be taught to distinguish between the different types of pain. We sometimes distinguish pain as bad pain vs. good pain. A better description might be pain vs. soreness. Good pain, or soreness, is felt in the muscle, not in the joint. It stops within a few minutes after exercise ends. There is less soreness associated with each subsequent exercise session. Normally, soreness is what we all experience to some extent when we exercise. Bad pain occurs in or near the joint, continues to hurt after exercise is complete, and does not improve with future sessions. It might even worsen with time. This usually indicates a problem with a joint or a muscle that is not normal. COPD (INCLUDING ASTHMA) Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) includes emphysema, chronic bronchitis, and asthma. In all of these disorders, either the lungs are inefficient or ventilation is compromised. Exercise can improve efficiency in ventilation, increase cardiovascular function, and increase muscular strength all of which enhance breathing function and reduce dyspnea (difficulty breathing). SrFit 211

Once the immune system is triggered, cells migrate from the blood into the joints and produce substances that cause inflammation.

Once the immune system is triggered, cells migrate from the blood into the joints and produce substances that cause inflammation. HealthExchange Points For Your Joints An Arthritis Talk Howard Epstein, MD Orthopaedic & Rheumatologic Institute Rheumatic & Immunologic Disease Cleveland Clinic Beachwood Family Health & Surgery Center

More information

Self Management Program. Ankle Sprains. Improving Care. Improving Business.

Self Management Program. Ankle Sprains. Improving Care. Improving Business. Ankle Sprains Improving Care. Improving Business. What is an ankle sprain? Ligaments attach to the ankle bones and allow for normal movement and help prevent too much motion within the joint. Ankle sprains

More information

Running Injury Prevention Tips & Return to Running Program

Running Injury Prevention Tips & Return to Running Program Department of Rehabilitation Services Physical Therapy The intent of these guidelines is to provide the athlete with a framework for return to sports activity following injury. These guidelines should

More information

Physiotherapy in Rheumatoid Arthritis. Information for patients Gina Wall Senior Physiotherapist

Physiotherapy in Rheumatoid Arthritis. Information for patients Gina Wall Senior Physiotherapist Physiotherapy in Rheumatoid Arthritis Information for patients Gina Wall Senior Physiotherapist What do Physiotherapists do? We conduct assessments by asking detailed questions about your symptoms, medical

More information

Muscle strains and ligament injuries. Lupus. Back injuries. Scleroderma. Osteoarthritis. Fibromyalgia. Rheumatoid arthritis

Muscle strains and ligament injuries. Lupus. Back injuries. Scleroderma. Osteoarthritis. Fibromyalgia. Rheumatoid arthritis Causes of Joint Pain in Women Muscle strains and ligament injuries Back injuries Osteoarthritis Over 60% of people with arthritis are female Rheumatoid arthritis Affects women 3x more than men Lupus Affects

More information

Exercise Principles and Guidelines for Persons with Cerebral Palsy and Neuromuscular Disorders

Exercise Principles and Guidelines for Persons with Cerebral Palsy and Neuromuscular Disorders Exercise Principles and Guidelines for Persons with Cerebral Palsy and Neuromuscular Disorders INTRODUCTION: Health and well being are the result of many factors: Physical activity is one of these factors.

More information

Arthritis www.patientedu.org

Arthritis www.patientedu.org written by Harvard Medical School Arthritis www.patientedu.org Arthritis is the most common chronic disease in the world, and it s the leading cause of disability in the United States. There are more than

More information

Low Back Pain Exercise Guide

Low Back Pain Exercise Guide Low Back Pain Exercise Guide Active forms of back exercises are almost always necessary to help alleviate lower back pain and rehabilitate the spine for long-term health. Before starting any new exercise

More information

UNDERSTANDING STRESS AND YOUR BODY

UNDERSTANDING STRESS AND YOUR BODY UNDERSTANDING STRESS AND YOUR BODY Life s demands create stress and although some stress may be good, too much can cause health problems. Most people equate stress with high blood pressure, a heart attack

More information

Information on Rheumatoid Arthritis

Information on Rheumatoid Arthritis Information on Rheumatoid Arthritis Table of Contents About Rheumatoid Arthritis 1 Definition 1 Signs and symptoms 1 Causes 1 Risk factors 1 Test and diagnosis 2 Treatment options 2 Lifestyle 3 References

More information

X-Plain Rheumatoid Arthritis Reference Summary

X-Plain Rheumatoid Arthritis Reference Summary X-Plain Rheumatoid Arthritis Reference Summary Introduction Rheumatoid arthritis is a fairly common joint disease that affects up to 2 million Americans. Rheumatoid arthritis is one of the most debilitating

More information

If I eat certain foods, will my rheumatoid arthritis symptoms improve? Answer

If I eat certain foods, will my rheumatoid arthritis symptoms improve? Answer August 17, 2010 Rheumatoid arthritis Question Rheumatoid arthritis diet: Do certain foods reduce symptoms? If I eat certain foods, will my rheumatoid arthritis symptoms improve? Answer By April Chang-Miller,

More information

SENIOR S HEALTH INFORMATION PACK. www.northsfitness.com.au

SENIOR S HEALTH INFORMATION PACK. www.northsfitness.com.au SENIOR S HEALTH INFORMATION PACK www.northsfitness.com.au North Sydney Leagues Club 12 Abbott Street, Cammeray NSW 2062 T: 02 9245 3011 E: fitness@norths.com.au It s never too late to start... Seniors

More information

Physical Activity and Weight Control

Physical Activity and Weight Control Physical Activity and Weight Control WIN Weight-control Information Network U.S. Department of Health and Human Services NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH Physical Activity and Weight Control Physical activity

More information

STRESS. Health & Wellness The Newsletter About Achieving and Maintaining Optimal Well-being UNDERSTANDING AND YOUR BODY. www.neorthopt.

STRESS. Health & Wellness The Newsletter About Achieving and Maintaining Optimal Well-being UNDERSTANDING AND YOUR BODY. www.neorthopt. Health & Wellness The Newsletter About Achieving and Maintaining Optimal Well-being UNDERSTANDING STRESS AND YOUR BODY Life s demands create stress and although some stress may be good, too much can cause

More information

Preventing & Treating Low Back Pain

Preventing & Treating Low Back Pain Preventing & Treating Low Back Pain An Introduction to Low Back Pain Low back pain is the number two reason that Americans see a health care practitioner second only to colds and flu. While most people

More information

Lumbar Disc Herniation/Bulge Protocol

Lumbar Disc Herniation/Bulge Protocol Lumbar Disc Herniation/Bulge Protocol Anatomy and Biomechanics The lumbar spine is made up of 5 load transferring bones called vertebrae. They are stacked in a column with an intervertebral disc sandwiched

More information

Helping you manage your pain

Helping you manage your pain Helping you manage your pain This booklet contains confidential personal information. If found, please mail to the address below. Personal details Name Address Telephone My health care team (please tick)

More information

July 2012 Exercise Away Your Knee Pain It seems counterintuitive, but when it hurts to move

July 2012 Exercise Away Your Knee Pain It seems counterintuitive, but when it hurts to move Exercise Away Your Knee Pain It seems counterintuitive, but when it hurts to move your knee, the best thing you can do is move your knee. A 2009 study in the British Medical Journal found that supervised

More information

Shoulder Joint Replacement

Shoulder Joint Replacement Shoulder Joint Replacement Many people know someone with an artificial knee or hip joint. Shoulder replacement is less common, but it is just as successful in relieving joint pain. Shoulder replacement

More information

Pulmonary Rehabilitation. Steve Crogan RRT Pulmonary Rehabilitation, University of Washington Medical Center Seattle, Washington 10/13/07

Pulmonary Rehabilitation. Steve Crogan RRT Pulmonary Rehabilitation, University of Washington Medical Center Seattle, Washington 10/13/07 Pulmonary Rehabilitation Steve Crogan RRT Pulmonary Rehabilitation, University of Washington Medical Seattle, Washington 10/13/07 Pulmonary Rehabilitation Created in the 1970 s Initially intended for COPD

More information

The Knee Joint. Patella Cartilage. Fibula Tibia

The Knee Joint. Patella Cartilage. Fibula Tibia The Knee Joint Femur Patella Cartilage Fibula Tibia A joint is where two or more bones meet. A joint allows the bones to move freely. The knee joint is a strong weight bearing joint. It has to be strong

More information

Pulmonary Rehabilitation Program - Home Exercise Program

Pulmonary Rehabilitation Program - Home Exercise Program Pulmonary Rehabilitation Program - Home Exercise Program Getting Started Regular exercise should be a part of life for everyone. Exercise improves the body's tolerance to activity and work, and strengthens

More information

Medical Clearance Form

Medical Clearance Form Medical Clearance Form Client: Physician: Address: Address: Telephone: Telephone: Dear Physician: Please provide the following information to assist my senior fitness trainer in implementing my physical

More information

Asthma, anxiety & depression

Asthma, anxiety & depression Anxiety and are common in people with asthma. The good news is that there are effective treatments both for asthma and for anxiety and. With careful management, the symptoms of anxiety and can be treated

More information

Therapeutic Canine Massage

Therapeutic Canine Massage Meet our Certified Canine Massage Therapist, Stevi Quick After years of competitive grooming and handling several breeds in conformation, I became interested in training and competing with my dogs in the

More information

PLANTAR FASCITIS (Heel Spur Syndrome)

PLANTAR FASCITIS (Heel Spur Syndrome) PLANTAR FASCITIS (Heel Spur Syndrome) R. Amadeus Mason MD Description Plantar fascitis is characterized by stiffness and inflammation of the main fascia (fibrous connective [ligament-like] tissue) on the

More information

ELBOW FRACTURE (Epicondyle)

ELBOW FRACTURE (Epicondyle) Montefiore Pediatric Orthopedic and Scoliosis Center Children s Hospital at Montefiore Norman Otsuka MD Eric Fornari MD Jacob Schulz MD Jaime Gomez MD Christine Moloney PA 3400 Bainbridge Avenue, 6 th

More information

PHYSICAL ACTIVITY & EXERCISE STRATEGIES FOR BARIATRIC SURGERY PATIENTS

PHYSICAL ACTIVITY & EXERCISE STRATEGIES FOR BARIATRIC SURGERY PATIENTS PHYSICAL ACTIVITY & EXERCISE STRATEGIES FOR BARIATRIC SURGERY PATIENTS The University of Chicago Hospitals Center for the Surgical Treatment of Obesity (March 2005) BENEFITS OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY In order

More information

The Arizona Quarterly Spine Official Newsletter of SpineScottsdale Physical Therapy and the Center for SpineHealth

The Arizona Quarterly Spine Official Newsletter of SpineScottsdale Physical Therapy and the Center for SpineHealth Q2 2013 What s new in 2013? P a g e 1 SpineScottsdale Physical Therapy The Arizona Quarterly Spine Official Newsletter of SpineScottsdale Physical Therapy and the Center for SpineHealth Center for SpineHealth

More information

Rheumatoid Arthritis

Rheumatoid Arthritis Rheumatoid Arthritis While rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has long been feared as one of the most disabling types of arthritis, the outlook has dramatically improved for many newly diagnosed patients. Certainly

More information

The advanced back rehabilitation programme

The advanced back rehabilitation programme Physiotherapy Department The advanced back rehabilitation programme This booklet explains what happens during the advanced back rehabilitation programme and how the exercises may help your condition. We

More information

Sports Injury Treatment

Sports Injury Treatment Sports Injury Treatment Participating in a variety of sports is fun and healthy for children and adults. However, it's critical that before you participate in any sport, you are aware of the precautions

More information

Heart Failure Patient information exercise sheets

Heart Failure Patient information exercise sheets Aerobic Exercise and Chronic Heart Failure Shortness of breath and tiredness are common symptoms for people with chronic heart failure. Many people find that they are unable to do some activities that

More information

What you can do to help your child in pain

What you can do to help your child in pain What you can do to help your child in pain About pain A child with cancer or other diseases will likely have pain at times. The pain can keep him or her from being active, from sleeping well, from enjoying

More information

Elbow Injuries and Disorders

Elbow Injuries and Disorders Elbow Injuries and Disorders Introduction Your elbow joint is made up of bone, cartilage, ligaments and fluid. Muscles and tendons help the elbow joint move. There are many injuries and disorders that

More information

(Intro to Arthritis with a. Arthritis) Manager of Education & Services for the Vancouver Island Region of The Arthritis Society

(Intro to Arthritis with a. Arthritis) Manager of Education & Services for the Vancouver Island Region of The Arthritis Society Arthritis 101 (Intro to Arthritis with a Focus on Rheumatoid Arthritis) by Cari Taylor by Cari Taylor Manager of Education & Services for the Vancouver Island Region of The Arthritis Society What You Will

More information

.org. Achilles Tendinitis. Description. Cause. Achilles tendinitis is a common condition that causes pain along the back of the leg near the heel.

.org. Achilles Tendinitis. Description. Cause. Achilles tendinitis is a common condition that causes pain along the back of the leg near the heel. Achilles Tendinitis Page ( 1 ) Achilles tendinitis is a common condition that causes pain along the back of the leg near the heel. The Achilles tendon is the largest tendon in the body. It connects your

More information

Hand Injuries and Disorders

Hand Injuries and Disorders Hand Injuries and Disorders Introduction Each of your hands has 27 bones, 15 joints and approximately 20 muscles. There are many common problems that can affect your hands. Hand problems can be caused

More information

PAIN MANAGEMENT During Your Hospital Stay

PAIN MANAGEMENT During Your Hospital Stay PAIN MANAGEMENT During Your Hospital Stay TABLE OF CONTENTS Understanding Pain...2 Pain Assessment...2 Describing Your Pain...5 Pain Treatment...5 Comfort Measures...6 Medication...7 Specialty Procedures...8

More information

Osteoporosis and Arthritis: Two Common but Different Conditions

Osteoporosis and Arthritis: Two Common but Different Conditions and : Two Common but Different Conditions National Institutes of Health and Related Bone Diseases ~ National Resource Center 2 AMS Circle Bethesda, MD 20892 3676 Tel: 800 624 BONE or 202 223 0344 Fax:

More information

Rheumatoid Arthritis www.arthritis.org.nz

Rheumatoid Arthritis www.arthritis.org.nz Rheumatoid Arthritis www.arthritis.org.nz Did you know? RA is the second most common form of arthritis Approximately 40,000 New Zealanders have RA RA can occur at any age, but most often appears between

More information

ARTHRITIS INTRODUCTION

ARTHRITIS INTRODUCTION ARTHRITIS INTRODUCTION Arthritis is the most common disease affecting the joints. There are various forms of arthritis but the two that are the most common are osteoarthritis (OA), and rheumatoid arthritis

More information

world-class orthopedic care right in your own backyard.

world-class orthopedic care right in your own backyard. world-class orthopedic care right in your own backyard. Patient Promise: At Adventist Hinsdale Hospital, our Patient Promise means we strive for continued excellence in everything we do. This means you

More information

Sacro Iliac Joint Sprains

Sacro Iliac Joint Sprains Sacro Iliac Joint Sprains The sacroiliac joint(s) is an amazingly complex joint. It is formed by the sacrum and its connection or articulation to the iliac bones or pelvis. It is a compound joint, where

More information

The Benefits of Exercise for People with Heart Disease

The Benefits of Exercise for People with Heart Disease The Benefits of Exercise for People with Heart Disease Your heart is a muscle that needs regular exercise. When you exercise, your heart has to pump blood faster to get it to your muscles and lungs, and

More information

ILIOTIBIAL BAND SYNDROME

ILIOTIBIAL BAND SYNDROME ILIOTIBIAL BAND SYNDROME Description The iliotibial band is the tendon attachment of hip muscles into the upper leg (tibia) just below the knee to the outer side of the front of the leg. Where the tendon

More information

PATIENT REGISTRATION

PATIENT REGISTRATION Orthopedic & Sports Therapy Center PATIENT REGISTRATION NAME DATE OF BIRTH SSN# FIRST MI LAST PHONE INFO: HOME BEST WAY TO CONFIRM APPOINTMENTS WORK CALL TEXT EMAIL MOBILE (TEXT) MOBILE CARRIER EMAIL ADDRESS

More information

Electroconvulsive Therapy - ECT

Electroconvulsive Therapy - ECT Electroconvulsive Therapy - ECT Introduction Electroconvulsive therapy, or ECT, is a safe and effective treatment that may reduce symptoms related to depression or mental illness. During ECT, certain parts

More information

The Annual Direct Care of Asthma

The Annual Direct Care of Asthma The Annual Direct Care of Asthma The annual direct health care cost of asthma in the United States is approximately $11.5 billion; indirect costs (e.g. lost productivity) add another $4.6 billion for a

More information

Community-Acquired Pneumonia

Community-Acquired Pneumonia GREY BRUCE HEALTH NETWORK EVIDENCE-BASED CARE PROGRAM Community-Acquired Pneumonia Patient Education Booklet (In-Patient) 2003-2010 Grey Bruce Health Network Table of Contents What is Pneumonia?...1 What

More information

Acute Low Back Pain. What is low back pain? What are the risk factors? How does it occur?

Acute Low Back Pain. What is low back pain? What are the risk factors? How does it occur? What is low back pain? Almost everyone has back pain at one time or another. The pain may be in the center of the back or to one side, or even move down the leg. Symptoms may also include pain in the back

More information

SCRIPT NUMBER 82 SPRAINED ANKLE (TWO SPEAKERS)

SCRIPT NUMBER 82 SPRAINED ANKLE (TWO SPEAKERS) SCRIPT NUMBER 82 SPRAINED ANKLE (TWO SPEAKERS) PROGRAM NAME: HEALTH NUGGETS PROGRAM TITLE: SPRAINED ANKLE PROGRAM NUMBER: 82 SUBJECT: PATHOLOGY, CAUSES, DIAGNOSIS, TREATMENT, PREVENTION OF SPRAINED ANKLES

More information

.org. Arthritis of the Hand. Description

.org. Arthritis of the Hand. Description Arthritis of the Hand Page ( 1 ) The hand and wrist have multiple small joints that work together to produce motion, including the fine motion needed to thread a needle or tie a shoelace. When the joints

More information

Shoulder Replacement Arthroplasty to repair your shoulder

Shoulder Replacement Arthroplasty to repair your shoulder Patient Education Shoulder Replacement Arthroplasty to repair your shoulder When you have arthritis in your shoulder, moving your shoulder becomes painful. You may have trouble with tasks such as lifting

More information

Arthritis in Children: Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis By Kerry V. Cooke

Arthritis in Children: Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis By Kerry V. Cooke Reading Comprehension Read the following essay on juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. Then use the information in the text to answer the questions that follow. Arthritis in Children: Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis

More information

Therall. Arthritis. Living with. A guide to understanding and managing Arthritis

Therall. Arthritis. Living with. A guide to understanding and managing Arthritis Therall Arthritis PAin relief Living with Arthritis A guide to understanding and managing Arthritis Arthritis Facts There are currently 4.5 million persons suffering from arthritis in Canada This number

More information

Schiffert Health Center Shoulder Pain COMMON CAUSES: QUICK TREATMENT : SHOULDER PAIN TREATING SHOULDER PAIN:

Schiffert Health Center  Shoulder Pain COMMON CAUSES: QUICK TREATMENT : SHOULDER PAIN TREATING SHOULDER PAIN: Schiffert Health Center www.healthcenter.vt.edu Patient Information: Shoulder Pain COMMON CAUSES: Shoulder injury or pain may be triggered by a specific event, such as a direct blow or fall. More common

More information

IMGPT: Exercise After a Heart Attack 610 944 8140 805 N. RICHMOND ST (Located next to Fleetwood HS) Why is exercise important following a heart

IMGPT: Exercise After a Heart Attack 610 944 8140 805 N. RICHMOND ST (Located next to Fleetwood HS) Why is exercise important following a heart Why is exercise important following a heart attack? Slow progression back into daily activity is important to strengthen the heart muscle and return blood flow to normal. By adding aerobic exercises, your

More information

Schiffert Health Center www.healthcenter.vt.edu. Neck Pain (Cervical Strain) COMMON CAUSES: QUICK TREATMENT : NECK PAIN TREATING NECK PAIN:

Schiffert Health Center www.healthcenter.vt.edu. Neck Pain (Cervical Strain) COMMON CAUSES: QUICK TREATMENT : NECK PAIN TREATING NECK PAIN: Schiffert Health Center www.healthcenter.vt.edu Patient Information: Neck Pain (Cervical Strain) COMMON CAUSES: Neck pain may be triggered by a specific event, such a sport injury or motor vehicle accident.

More information

The type of cancer Your specific treatment Your pre training levels before diagnose (your current strength and fitness levels)

The type of cancer Your specific treatment Your pre training levels before diagnose (your current strength and fitness levels) Exercise and Breast Cancer: Things you can do! Cancer within the fire service is one of the most dangerous threats to our firefighter s health & wellness. According to the latest studies firefighters are

More information

Health Tips. Medications Will Vary from Patient to Patient

Health Tips. Medications Will Vary from Patient to Patient 450 Bedford Street Lexington, MA 02420 USA 781-301-6060 781-862-1116 fax info@fshsociety.org www.fshsociety.org Health Tips FSHD is highly variable, even among family affected members. Each person is different

More information

A Patient's Guide to Arthritis of the Finger Joints

A Patient's Guide to Arthritis of the Finger Joints Introduction A Patient's Guide to Arthritis of the Finger Joints When you stop to think about how much you use your hands, it's easy to see why the joints of the fingers are so important. Arthritis of

More information

WORKERS COMPENSATION INTAKE FORM

WORKERS COMPENSATION INTAKE FORM WORKERS COMPENSATION INTAKE FORM related injury? No Yes INSURANCE INFORMATION RELEASE By clicking this box,i hereby authorize ABA Physical Therapy Associates to release to my Insurance company/attorney,

More information

CONTENTS. Note to the Reader 00. Acknowledgments 00. About the Author 00. Preface 00. Introduction 00

CONTENTS. Note to the Reader 00. Acknowledgments 00. About the Author 00. Preface 00. Introduction 00 Natural Therapies for Emphysema By Robert J. Green Jr., N.D. CONTENTS Note to the Reader 00 Acknowledgments 00 About the Author 00 Preface 00 Introduction 00 1 Essential Respiratory Anatomy and Physiology

More information

Introduction: Anatomy of the spine and lower back:

Introduction: Anatomy of the spine and lower back: Castleknock GAA club member and Chartered Physiotherapist, James Sherry MISCP, has prepared an informative article on the common causes of back pain and how best it can be treated. To book a physiotherapy

More information

How to treat your injured neck

How to treat your injured neck How to treat your injured neck Exceptional healthcare, personally delivered Your neck is made up of a number of bones bound together by strong discs and ligaments. It is also protected by strong muscles.

More information

15 things you might not know about back pain

15 things you might not know about back pain 15 things you might not know about back pain Mary O Keeffe (University of Limerick), Dr Kieran O Sullivan (University of Limerick), Dr Derek Griffin (Tralee Physiotherapy Clinic) Managing back pain costs

More information

Cervical Spondylosis (Arthritis of the Neck)

Cervical Spondylosis (Arthritis of the Neck) Copyright 2009 American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Cervical Spondylosis (Arthritis of the Neck) Neck pain is extremely common. It can be caused by many things, and is most often related to getting

More information

Your Life Called. It Wants You Back.

Your Life Called. It Wants You Back. Your Life Called. It Wants You Back. Duke Raleigh Orthopaedic and Spine Center Duke Raleigh Orthopaedic and Spine Center A quick trip to the grocery store. A walk to the mailbox. A hug from a grandchild.

More information

Your knee: Rheumatoid arthritis or osteoarthritis?

Your knee: Rheumatoid arthritis or osteoarthritis? Your knee: Rheumatoid arthritis or osteoarthritis? Age Rheumatoid arthritis can come on at any age while osteoarthritis usually starts later in life. How does it start? Rheumatoid arthritis comes on rapidly

More information

Back & Neck Pain Survival Guide

Back & Neck Pain Survival Guide Back & Neck Pain Survival Guide www.kleinpeterpt.com Zachary - 225-658-7751 Baton Rouge - 225-768-7676 Kleinpeter Physical Therapy - Spine Care Program Finally! A Proven Assessment & Treatment Program

More information

IFA Senior Fitness Certification Test Answer Form

IFA Senior Fitness Certification Test Answer Form IFA Senior Fitness Certification Test Answer Form In order to receive your certification card, take the following test and mail this single page answer sheet in with your check or money order in US funds.

More information

USCGA Health and Physical Education Fitness Preparation Guidelines

USCGA Health and Physical Education Fitness Preparation Guidelines USCGA Health and Physical Education Fitness Preparation Guidelines MUSCULAR STRENGTH Muscular strength and endurance can be improved by systematically increasing the load (resistance) that you are using.

More information

Patient Guide. Sacroiliac Joint Pain

Patient Guide. Sacroiliac Joint Pain Patient Guide Sacroiliac Joint Pain Anatomy Where is the Sacroiliac Joint? The sacroiliac joint (SIJ) is located at the bottom end of your spine, where the "tailbone" (sacrum) joins the pelvis (ilium).

More information

Fact Sheet: Occupational Overuse Syndrome (OOS)

Fact Sheet: Occupational Overuse Syndrome (OOS) Fact Sheet: Occupational Overuse Syndrome (OOS) What is OOS? Occupational Overuse Syndrome (OOS) is the term given to a range of conditions characterised by discomfort or persistent pain in muscles, tendons

More information

What is Osteoarthritis? Who gets Osteoarthritis? What can I do when I am diagnosed with Osteoarthritis? What can my doctor do to help me?

What is Osteoarthritis? Who gets Osteoarthritis? What can I do when I am diagnosed with Osteoarthritis? What can my doctor do to help me? Knee Osteoarthritis What is Osteoarthritis? Osteoarthritis is a disease process that affects the cartilage within a joint. Cartilage exists at the surface of the ends of the bones and provides joints with

More information

.org. Distal Radius Fracture (Broken Wrist) Description. Cause

.org. Distal Radius Fracture (Broken Wrist) Description. Cause Distal Radius Fracture (Broken Wrist) Page ( 1 ) The radius is the larger of the two bones of the forearm. The end toward the wrist is called the distal end. A fracture of the distal radius occurs when

More information

Frozen Shoulder Surgery. Decreasing Pain and Improving Flexibility

Frozen Shoulder Surgery. Decreasing Pain and Improving Flexibility Frozen Shoulder Surgery Decreasing Pain and Improving Flexibility Understanding Frozen Shoulder Have you felt nagging pain and stiffness in your shoulder? If so, you may have frozen shoulder. This problem

More information

.org. Tennis Elbow (Lateral Epicondylitis) Anatomy. Cause

.org. Tennis Elbow (Lateral Epicondylitis) Anatomy. Cause Tennis Elbow (Lateral Epicondylitis) Page ( 1 ) Tennis elbow, or lateral epicondylitis, is a painful condition of the elbow caused by overuse. Not surprisingly, playing tennis or other racquet sports can

More information

Acute Low Back Pain. North American Spine Society Public Education Series

Acute Low Back Pain. North American Spine Society Public Education Series Acute Low Back Pain North American Spine Society Public Education Series What Is Acute Low Back Pain? Acute low back pain (LBP) is defined as low back pain present for up to six weeks. It may be experienced

More information

Do You Have the Courage to Finally Unite Your Mind, Body and Spirit for a Health and Fitness Awakening?

Do You Have the Courage to Finally Unite Your Mind, Body and Spirit for a Health and Fitness Awakening? 1 P a g e Adult & Senior Personal Training, Health, Fitness, Martial Arts Training and Coaching Use Exercise as Your Fountain of Youth -- Combat the Effects of Aging with Exercise Do You Have the Courage

More information

Manage cancer related fatigue:

Manage cancer related fatigue: Manage cancer related fatigue: For People Affected by Cancer In this pamphlet: What can I do to manage fatigue? What is cancer related fatigue? What causes cancer related fatigue? How can my health care

More information

Understanding Rheumatoid Arthritis

Understanding Rheumatoid Arthritis Understanding Rheumatoid Arthritis Understanding Rheumatoid Arthritis What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis? 1,2 Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune disease. It causes joints to swell and can result

More information

INFORMED CONSENT INFORMED CONSENT FOR PARTICIPATION IN A HEALTH AND FITNESS TRAINING PROGRAM

INFORMED CONSENT INFORMED CONSENT FOR PARTICIPATION IN A HEALTH AND FITNESS TRAINING PROGRAM INFORMED CONSENT INFORMED CONSENT FOR PARTICIPATION IN A HEALTH AND FITNESS TRAINING PROGRAM NAME: DATE: 1. PURPOSE AND EXPLANATION OF PROCEDURE I hereby consent to voluntarily engage in an acceptable

More information

Knee Arthroscopy Post-operative Instructions

Knee Arthroscopy Post-operative Instructions Amon T. Ferry, MD Orthopedic Surgery Sports Medicine Knee Arthroscopy Post-operative Instructions PLEASE READ ALL OF THESE INSTRUCTIONS CAREFULLY. THEY WILL ANSWER MOST OF YOUR QUESTIONS. 1. You may walk

More information

Herniated Lumbar Disc

Herniated Lumbar Disc Herniated Lumbar Disc North American Spine Society Public Education Series What Is a Herniated Disc? The spine is made up of a series of connected bones called vertebrae. The disc is a combination of strong

More information

Benefits of a Working Relationship Between Medical and Allied Health Practitioners and Personal Fitness Trainers

Benefits of a Working Relationship Between Medical and Allied Health Practitioners and Personal Fitness Trainers Benefits of a Working Relationship Between Medical and Allied Health Practitioners and Personal Fitness Trainers Introduction The health benefits of physical activity have been documented in numerous scientific

More information

Hand & Plastics Physiotherapy Department Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Information for patients

Hand & Plastics Physiotherapy Department Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Information for patients Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust Hand & Plastics Physiotherapy Department Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Information for patients page 2 What is the Carpal Tunnel? The carpal tunnel is made up of the bones

More information

Personal Training Pre-Participation Packet

Personal Training Pre-Participation Packet Client name: W# Personal Trainer: Returning Client: YES or NO Personal Training Pre-Participation Packet Dear Client, Welcome to the Personal Training Program. We are excited that you have chosen to participate

More information

GALLAND/KIRBY INTERVAL DISTANCE RUNNING REHABILITATION PROGRAM

GALLAND/KIRBY INTERVAL DISTANCE RUNNING REHABILITATION PROGRAM GALLAND/KIRBY INTERVAL DISTANCE RUNNING REHABILITATION PROGRAM PHASE I: WALKING PROGRAM Must be able to walk, pain free, aggressively (roughly 4.2 to 5.2 miles per hour), preferably on a treadmill, before

More information

TOTAL HIP REPLACEMENT

TOTAL HIP REPLACEMENT TOTAL HIP REPLACEMENT 2 Causes of Hip Pain Arthritis is the leading cause of disability in the United States, and the most frequent cause of discomfort and chronic hip pain. In fact, it s estimated that

More information

TAKING CARE OF YOUR RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

TAKING CARE OF YOUR RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS TAKING CARE OF YOUR RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS (RA) FAST FACTS What is Rheumatoid Arthritis? Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic disease that can affect your ability to function and be

More information

Shoulder Replacement Surgery

Shoulder Replacement Surgery In What Activities May I Participate After I Recover? Shoulder Replacement Surgery After undergoing shoulder replacement surgery, it is important to have realistic expectations about the types of activities

More information

REPs CPD UPSKILLING PAPER 14 16 year olds (Children's Fitness)

REPs CPD UPSKILLING PAPER 14 16 year olds (Children's Fitness) Young People This guidance relates to the provision of safe exercise instruction to young people in a gym and studio environment (aged 14 to 17). Gym and studio environments are typically designed with

More information

Treatment depends on the severity of the injury. Many times, self-care measures and over-the-counter pain medications are all that you'll need.

Treatment depends on the severity of the injury. Many times, self-care measures and over-the-counter pain medications are all that you'll need. Sprains and Strains Overview When you overdo it physically, you may experience sudden pain and swelling around a joint or a muscle. This may occur when you stretch too far, change direction or slow down

More information

.org. Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction. Anatomy. Cause. Symptoms

.org. Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction. Anatomy. Cause. Symptoms Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction Page ( 1 ) Posterior tibial tendon dysfunction is one of the most common problems of the foot and ankle. It occurs when the posterior tibial tendon becomes inflamed

More information

Pain-Relief Exercise: The Lower Back

Pain-Relief Exercise: The Lower Back Pain-Relief Exercise: The Lower Back by Marc Heller, DC Specific exercises are a powerful tool for acute pain relief. These exercises are specific for sciatica or discogenic low back pain, and can help

More information

SCRIPT NUMBER 125 RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS - 2 (TWO SPEAKERS)

SCRIPT NUMBER 125 RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS - 2 (TWO SPEAKERS) SCRIPT NUMBER 125 RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS - 2 (TWO SPEAKERS) PROGRAM NAME: HEALTH NUGGETS PROGRAM TITLE: RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS - 2 PROGRAM NUMBER: 125 SUBJECT: SYMPTOMS, CAUSES, TREATMENT, SELF-CARE OF RHEUMATOID

More information

Before Surgery You will likely be asked to see your family physician or an internal medicine doctor for a thorough medical evaluation.

Before Surgery You will likely be asked to see your family physician or an internal medicine doctor for a thorough medical evaluation. Anterior Hip Replacement - Before and After Surgery Your Hip Evaluation An orthopaedic surgeon specializes in problems affecting bones and joints. The surgeon will ask you many questions about your hip

More information