City of New Orleans Fire Department. Recovery and Reconstitution Planning Process after Hurricane Katrina

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1 City of New Orleans Fire Department R E P O R T Recovery and Reconstitution Planning Process after Hurricane Katrina MARCH 31, 2006

2 City of New Orleans Fire Department Strategic Recovery and Reconstitution Planning Process for the City of New Orleans Fire Department Decimated by Hurricane Katrina MARCH 31, 2006

3 Executive Summary Following the devastating impacts of Hurricane Katrina, the City of New Orleans Fire Department (NOFD) initiated a strategic planning process to recover and reconstitute fire and emergency services delivery to the city. Assistance was sought from the Department of Homeland Security s U.S. Fire Administration (USFA), and this funding enabled a planning process to unfold whereby a series of goals and objectives have been established. USFA designed and facilitated the planning process in collaboration with NOFD. Additional expertise was added through a cooperative agreement established between USFA and the International Association of Fire Chiefs (IAFC). The planning process began in mid-october 2005, a little more than one month following Katrina s landfall. Meetings in November and January 2006 followed. At each meeting, NOFD senior managers and selected staff convened with a group of nationally recognized fire service experts to examine the devastation wrought by Katrina, discuss the immediate impact of fire and emergency services delivery, and decide how to best recover and reconstitute delivery of services to the city. Additional planning activities were conducted and information obtained between each of the meetings. The process included a review of the current city status, a physical tour of the city by the planning team, a discussion of NOFD strengths-weaknesses-opportunities and challenges, the formation of strategic service delivery areas, and the development of both imminent and long-term goals and objectives. In the midst of the planning process, NOFD suffered a devastating blow, the loss of Captain Richard McCurley and injury to other members in an apparatus accident in early December. This tragedy resulted in the December meeting being postponed until January. Throughout the entire planning process, the planning assumptions were ever changing and this is expected to continue. There is no doubt that by the time this document is printed, some of the goals and objectives will change as a result of the dynamic nature of the disaster recovery process. For the purposes of organizing the process and reporting the goals and objectives, four planning cells were identified and assembled. They were: human resources and professional knowledge/ skills/ability (KSAs); emergency response/preparedness and customer service; prevention/protection and public information-education-relations (PIER) program; equipment/facilities/supplies and administration support issues. Each of these cells initially worked independent of the other and then reported their findings and recommendations to the entire planning group. Each cell consisted of NOFD members working with USFA team members. delivery of emergency services based on risk assessment (population density, life-safety and property values). They include the acquisition of facilities and repair of stations, apparatus and equipment; the welfare and care of NOFD members given that many of their homes were either destroyed or significantly damaged; maintaining effective communications with all NOFD members and city officials; communicating effectively with the public through the media; and assessing damaged properties with the appropriate action to mitigate any hazards and prevent future incidents. These objectives are compiled and can be reviewed on pp For the long range actions listed on pp , the strategic direction of NOFD is premised around continued organizational development and pursuit of excellence even though presently there are great challenges. This includes attaining fire department accreditation, achieving an Insurance Services Office Class 1 rating, having the appropriate staffing, refurbishing and relocating fire stations to maximize their effectiveness, exploring the delivery of emergency medical services, professional development of all NOFD members, and enhancing the risk management culture through safety practices and built-in residential sprinklers. To achieve these strategic areas, the long-term goals with supporting objectives of NOFD must be embraced and engaged in. As the planning assumptions of the city continue to dynamically change, trends must be monitored and resource decisions must be committed to by the city and afforded to NOFD. Importantly, the planning team framed NOFD response capability around available staffing (number of trained personnel) and fire station locations. National standards (e.g. NFPA 1710) and other Occupational Safety & Health (OSHA) requirements require specified numbers of people to arrive at the incident scene within a certain amount of incident notification (response time). The planning team identified this as response capability objectives or RCOs. These RCOs provide the NOFD and the City of New Orleans with a base line for service delivery depending on the complexity and size of the incident. This information can be found on pp At the time of this report completion, NOFD is significantly engaged in completing an after-action report of its preparation and response to Hurricane Katrina. NOFD found that its Hurricane Plan 2005 was a valuable instrument that saved many lives from the effects of Katrina. A copy of this plan is included as Appendix C. NOFD anticipates changes to the Hurricane Plan based on its after-action report and the overall planning process. The imminent goals established by the team focused on re-establishing an acceptable standard of coverage model for the timely 3

4 Table of Contents EXECUTIVE SUMMARY... 3 TABLE OF CONTENTS... 5 F O R WA R D SUPERINTENDENT S COMMENTS AND INTRODUCTION... 9 LETTER/COMMENTS BY USFA INTRODUCTION NOFD MISSION STATEMENT DESCRIPTION AND OVERVIEW OF PLANNING PROCESS RATIONALE OF CONTEXT AND PLANNING PROCESS Meeting 1 Activities Strength, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Challenges Analysis Planning Issues Identified Strategic Functional Areas Planning Cell Work Groups Meeting 2 Activities Meeting 3 (postponed) Meeting 3 (rescheduled) Activities PLANNING PROCESS OUTCOMES IMMINENT ACTIONS BY FUNCTIONAL AREAS Planning Cells Areas and Assignments INTERIM ACTIONS BY FUNCTIONAL AREAS LONG-RANGE ACTIONS BY FUNCTIONAL AREAS APPENDICES APPENDIX A LIST OF PARTICIPANTS APPENDIX B CONCEPTUAL TEMPLATE APPENDIX C NOFD HURRICANE PLAN APPENDIX D DAMAGE ASSESSMENT AND STATUS OF NOFD STATIONS APPENDIX E LISTING OF STATIONS (PRE- AND POST-KATRINA) APPENDIX F LIST OF PERSONNEL POSITIONS (PRE- AND POST-KATRINA) APPENDIX G NOFD FY05 AND FY06 BUDGET APPENDIX H SHREVEPORT FIRE DEPARTMENT, LA ORGANIZATIONAL PRIORITIES

5 Forward This document represents the future direction of the City of New Orleans (Louisiana) Fire Department to recover and reconstitute, following the devastating effects of Hurricane Katrina. The planning process was made possible through the funding support of the department of Homeland Security s (DHS) U.S. Fire Administration (USFA). A cooperative agreement (EME-2006-CA- 0006) was initiated between DHS/USFA and the International Association of Fire Chiefs to facilitate the process. The City of New Orleans requested this assistance by submitting the necessary requisition through the federal disaster ordering process. The cooperative agreement provided for meeting and facility expenses to conduct the meetings, travel expenses for a group of nationally recognized fire and emergency services experts who provided their ideas and recommendations to the City, and for other miscellaneous expenses such as printing and the organization of planning related materials. The City of New Orleans Fire Department command staff that participated in the planning process was supported by the national expert group along with planning process design and facilitation assistance provided by USFA staff members. The IAFC rendered travel, project, logistical, and meeting support services. The official name of the project was titled Strategic Recovery and Reconstitution Planning Process for the City of New Orleans Fire Department Decimated by Hurricane Katrina. 7

6 DEPARTMENT OF FIRE CITY OF NEW ORLEANS Office of the Superintendent C. Ray Nagin Mayor of New Orleans Charles Parent Superintendent On August 29, 2005 New Orleans and the Gulf Coast were devastated by Hurricane Katrina, the worst natural disaster in the history of the United States. Our infrastructure was shattered, our roads were impassable, and communications were down. The entire city was without power, with over one thousand gas leaks throughout the city. There were hundreds of hazardous material incidents such as overturned tank cars and runaway barges and ships. Several large fires raged unchecked throughout the city and thousands of citizens were trapped in attics and on rooftops by the rising water. The brave members of the New Orleans Fire Department (NOFD) immediately sprang into action. Rescue efforts began as the winds howled and the water rose. They worked for several weeks at a Herculean pace. The majority of them had lost their homes and possessions and had no communication from their family for several days. Despite this they persevered, ignoring their personal hardship, and saved thousands of lives. Immediately after the storm, assistance poured in from our brothers and sisters in the fire service community; fire fighters streamed in from Louisiana, New York, Maryland, Illinois, and elsewhere around the country. The response was staggering and their assistance was immeasurable. Our reinforcements brought in manpower, equipment, and a willingness to do whatever was needed to rebuild the NOFD. Our Department lost communications, fire stations, vehicles, and equipment to the hurricane. What we did not lose was our dedication to duty and our resolve to serve the citizens of our city in any way possible. We realized that to rebuild our beloved Crescent City, the NOFD was going to need a strategic recovery plan. We reached out to the United States Fire Administration and the International Association of Fire Chiefs to assist us with this enormous task. After months of hard work, NOFD officers and staff, aided by many fire service professionals from around the country, have formulated a blueprint of recovery for the NOFD. In this strategic plan we now have a clear diagram for protecting the New Orleans citizens and their property. We will continue to have struggles as we rebuild, but we are confident that with the unrelenting assistance from our brothers and sisters in the fire service we will rebuild a better and safer New Orleans. We would like to thank the Federal Emergency Management Agency, U.S. Fire Administration, International Association of Fire Chiefs, and all the fire service professionals who worked with us in developing this plan. We were honored that they took the time out of their busy schedules to aid in creating this strategic mid-range and long-term recovery plan. Charles Parent Superintendent New Orleans Fire Department Seeking Opportunity To Serve 317 Decatur Street New Orleans, LA Fax

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8 Introduction The planning process described in this report is probably uncharacteristic of any strategic planning exercise ever encountered or implemented by either a fire service organization, or for that matter, any organization. Throughout the planning process, which commenced in late September of 2005, until the time of report completion, March 2006, the level of uncertainty regarding future directions of the City of New Orleans and its fire department has evolved within a very dynamic environment. In September following Katrina, the superintendent of the New Orleans Fire Department (NOFD) and his command officers recognized the challenges and uncertainty confronting the organization and the City that it serves to protect. Early discussions with U.S. Fire Administration staff during recovery operations reinforced the reality that NOFD needed to quickly develop plans for its recovery and reconstitution. Nearly every facet of NOFD had been severely impacted by Katrina, and the City it serves had equally been devastated. NOFD could not wait for the interim-to-long-term impacts of Katrina to become clearer; a decision was made to plan for the future to the best extent possible as quickly as possible. When federal funding to support the planning process was secured and confirmed in early October, the initial meeting (mid- October) more fully described later in this report, sought to provide both conditions of reality in conjunction with traditional planning tools used in more stable environments. One of the unique strengths associated with the outcomes herewith described was the assembling of a group of fire service experts who asked questions, observed conditions, listened to concerns and issues and, most importantly, made recommendations to the NOFD Superintendent and his staff officers. At the same time this group was significantly impressed with the post-katrina progress made by NOFD, and was empathetic to all of its future challenges. Appendix A lists participants involved in the process The planning process followed a model that was modified for NOFD purposes depicted in Appendix B. The model asked a series of questions regarding where is NOFD? Where does NOFD want to be? And, how does NOFD get there? The discussions that followed were strategic in nature, but also conducted with reality and practicality. During the planning process, conditions continued to evolve including the death of a NOFD captain in a lineof-duty accident and budget reductions further reducing the operational capacity of the department. The process itself took advantage of the expertise of the planning team members. Planning cells were created to study and create recommendations for their respective areas. Each cell would then provide reports to the plenary group and receive feedback regarding their work. The NOFD is proud to provide this report as it looks to the future in recovery and reconstitution. It has survived the greatest disaster ever to confront New Orleans, and it has served its citizens and visitors during and after Katrina with pride, professionalism and service. This report will reinforce and demonstrate its intent to continue providing the highest levels of emergency services available. NOFD Mission Statement The New Orleans Fire Department will respond to all emergencies in the City of New Orleans to protect and save life and property. Further, the department will strive to reduce the incidence of fire and the loss of life to civilians and fire personnel. 13

9 Description and Overview of Planning Process As a cooperative agreement between the New Orleans Fire Department (NOFD), United State Fire Administration (USFA) and the International Association of Fire Chiefs (IAFC), the planning process was multifaceted and clear processes were laid out in the initial stages. Chuck Burkell (USFA) provided the overview of the planning process, which was a conceptual template, adapted from Strategic Planning for Public Planning for Public and Nonprofit Organizations, by John Bryson. (Appendix B) recover from this devastating storm. A special guest, IAFC s 1st Vice President Jim Harmes, provided inspiring words to the group and reaffirmed the commitment of the IAFC. Introductions of all participants provided a brief overview of their backgrounds, personal experiences and dedication to this mission. Three main questions were addressed in Bryson s model: 1) Where is the NOFD currently? 2) Where does the NOFD want to be? 3) How does the NOFD get to where they want to be? These questions were answered and plans implemented by using the mission, vision, values and goal strategies of the NOFD. Planning cells were identified first and then focused on the functional areas of the NOFD. Before identifying strategies and goals, members from the NOFD gave progress reports of their respective division within the NOFD. From these reports, Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Challenges/Threats (SWOC) were identified for the NOFD. From the SWOCs that were provided, the planning group divided the headings into functional areas. Once the functional areas were identified they were split into four groups with two areas in each. Once split, members from the planning committee and the NOFD were assigned to the different groups to begin the process. The four groups were asked to identify imminent, interim and long-term goals for their two functional areas. The imminent goal time period was stated as days (December 3, 2005). Interim goal time period was identified as one month to one year. One to three years was identified as the long-range goal time period. For the three time periods, members created a strategic statement identifying what they wanted to accomplish in each respective time period. The facilitator reviewed the established planning model and processes. The group established a set of ground rules to be followed in the future activities. These were written and posted, then reviewed to ensure everyone was in agreement. Superintendent Charles Parent provided a historical perspective of the NOFD prior to Hurricane Katrina. He highlighted the funding challenges faced by the NOFD pre- and post-katrina, given the fact that the City faced serious financial conditions. He spoke to NOFD s response before, during and after the storm. Many rescues were augmented by private boats. He discussed the current reimbursement efforts during the disaster declarations and the time schedule they were challenged with to optimize the percent of reimbursement to be paid. The group received briefings of all key areas of the hurricane command, response and recovery efforts. A tour of New Orleans After the imminent, interim and long-term goals were identified by the functional areas, the groups began to plan their goals and objectives for each functional area. Meeting 1 Activities October 16-19, 2006 All meetings were held at the New Orleans Marriott which was still struggling with getting services and staff back in operations. The opening session included opening comments from Chuck Burkell, U.S. Fire Administration, who was serving as the facilitator for the process. Charlie Dickinson, deputy administrator, U.S. Fire Administration, also greeted the group and reiterated the commitment of the selected group to work with the NOFD to 15

10 was provided for the group that provided a clear appreciation of the magnitude of the devastation. It was apparent to the entire team the overwhelming elements NOFD faced during the peak of the emergency when the City was flooded. The group toured the areas near the levy breaches including the Lower 9th Ward and 17th Street Canal, and other areas of the City. Incident Management Team (IMT) Briefing Chief Richard Hampton, Incident Commander, provided a report on the challenges they faced with the loss of communications within the organization and with NOFD families. The latter was very significant since nearly all members were victims of the storm as well. New York Fire Department provided an initial Incident Management Team (IMT) structure after NOFD had relocated to Woodland on the west bank. As outside resources began to arrive, the NOFD members did not want to disengage for very needed rest. It was very important that NOFD maintained ownership of the emergency response to their city. NOFD staff shadowed the IMT process and ultimately took over all elements of the incident command system (ICS) in early October. Chief Tim McConnell provided an overview of the Emergency Operations System and provided a copy of the current Incident Action Plan (IAP) and reviewed the current and ongoing incident objectives from the ICS-202 form. Safety of all personnel remained the highest priority. Many of the safety measures taken for their firefighters were acknowledged by the efforts of Chief Gary Savelle who authored the New Orleans Fire Department 2005 Hurricane Guidelines (Appendix C). Operations Briefing Chief Gary Savelle, Operations Section Chief, reported that their hurricane plan had been implemented. After the levies failed there were some NOFD units and personnel stranded by the high waters. Access was made and they were either evacuated or provided supplies so they could be self-sustaining. Woodland became the staging area for displaced units and personnel. Civil unrest became a real concern for the safety of night operations. State of Louisiana Wild Land and Fisheries responded with boat resources and civilian boats were also utilized. The Emergency Mutual Aid Compact (EMAC) process was challenging to the NOFD due to unfamiliarity and was slow to be established. Selfdispatched units were not used for lack of accountability of personnel and capabilities. The Communication Center was closed and personnel were evacuated. Chief Pete Caruso will provide a report on communications later in this section. Water Supply Briefing Chief Savelle reported that the City water distribution remained intact during the storm but was later affected by damaged water mains and compromised pumping stations. Water tankers/tenders were utilized for those areas without domestic water. The NOFD 50 Kelly Unit (fire boat) was used to refill water supply units. Forestry teams assembled task forces and provided superior response capability. Water supply officers were supplied with current maps of the status of the water supply distribution system and the task force response plan. The City Water and Sewage Board developed a repair and replacement plan to bring the service back up incrementally. Due to political and public relations concerns, hydrants were not marked as out of service though they were known to be unusable. There were some questions raised about compressed air foam units or the use of wet water products and they were deemed non-feasible. A high rise inspection plan was instituted to ensure fire suppression systems were in tact for occupied structures such as the hotels. Those buildings without suppression systems were required to post fire watches. (Note: At the time of report submission in March 2006, serious concerns remain regarding the capabilities and integrity of the city water system.) Emergency Operations Center (EOC) Briefing Chief Mark Foulks, Knoxville (TN) Fire Department, provided a historical perspective of the International Association of Fire Chiefs (IAFC) response to the NOFD. The EOC was located in the Hyatt hotel. The roles evolved into supporting the EOC operations of the NOFD. Most significantly, the IAFC team supported the writing of the EMAC requests to acquire needed resources, including the request for the Strategic Planning Team that is here for this process. They also provided a liaison with the Woodland command post to ensure that resource needs were met and worked with the IMTs. Chief Foulks also spoke about their efforts with the Army Corps of Engineers (ACE) to provide for temporary fire stations. FEMA provided $3.8 million for this initiative, but they were told that they needed to go through the City s regular bid process. Since that would be time consuming, they met with the Coast Guard and were able to work directly with ACE. 16

11 Another key role the IAFC Team had was to legitimize processes and requests that were made. This was done by adherence to using the appropriate ICS forms. The Logistics Section was most challenged by the need to provide comprehensive Situation Status (SITSTAT) and Resource Status (RESSTAT) reports. They assisted in writing new and renewal contracts from FEMA. These contacts were going to be maintained as long as possible to relieve some of the fiscal burden on the City. He further noted that the New Orleans Police Department was not a key player in the EOC operations and that a strategic issue was identified that the City needed to embrace the NIMS ICS to improve integration of all other departments to reduce territorial issues that were impeding the emergency operations. Other local and state EOC challenges were discussed and it was noted that the SWOC analysis will be a critical process for moving forward. Facilities and Equipment Briefing Chief Edwin Holmes, Deputy Superintendent, reported on the status of the facilities and equipment of the NOFD. Information in Appendix D gave a detailed situation report on their stations and support facilities. Cost projections to make the facilities safe is assessed at approximately $59.4 million. An overview was also provided on the apparatus status. Cost for replacement and repairs was assessed at approximately $26.7 million. Equipment costs had not yet been determined. More extensive discussions on these needs will be done in future sessions. Human Relations Briefing Chief Norman Woodridge reported on the status of personnel as a result of the storm. He stated the personal losses and displacement of family members is a major issue. Critical Incident Stress Management services have been brought in and the NOFD officers understand the need for assessing their personnel for behavioral and attitudinal issues. In addition, the NOFD will be monitoring their personnel for signs of drug or alcohol related issues. USAR teams have been operationalized in those areas to assist NOFD in areas requiring search and recovery of human remains. There was discussion about staffing levels, attrition, and forecasted retirements. Superintendent Parent reported that of the ranking members, 70 captains and 19 chief officers are eligible for the Deferred Retirement Option Program (DROP). He said he was also concerned about the young personnel who are not yet vested, that they may seek other employment. There was some discussion about command staff fatigue, which could affect their decision making processes. These personnel have been working extended hours in severe conditions. Public Information, Education, and Relations (PIER) Briefing Chief Norman Woodridge reported on the Assessment Round Up process completed by the EOC. This assessment was by City zip codes and acknowledged response times, call types, services, staffing levels, and water supply capabilities. The Re-entry Plan provides the public with information on what to watch out for such as gas leaks, electrical shorts, and safe generator use. Commercial building assessments and HAZMAT concerns were being documented. Superintendent reported on some of the challenges with the media who wanted to get close to the frontline personnel who had lost everything. Personal agendas or influences of mutual aid response tended to affect the morale of the frontline personnel as well. There were many ways to utilize the media in a positive way to assist the NOFD by focusing on their resource needs and fundraising activities to assist the firefighters and their families. Hazard Assessment Briefing District Chief Steven Glynn provided an overview of the overall issues associated with building structure integrity and fire suppression issues. Additionally, HAZMAT incident issues are significant. There are concerns about utilities such as electric, gas lines, roadway integrity and obstructions. Health issues from standing waters, water compromised structures, wildlife, animals and dead bodies remain ongoing issues. Bacteria and mold laden buildings are issues during firefighting/overhaul and dust created by demolition. The facilitator provided a handout of a Wall St. Journal article titled New Orleans May Need to Bulldoze at Least 50,000 Houses. He also advised the group that he had collected newspaper articles from four major papers since August 24th. Communications Briefing Chief Pete Caruso reported prior to the storm they had a functional 800 MHz trucked radio system. Mutual aid interoperability system was in place. They had a progressive computer aided dispatch (CAD) and RMS system. Internet was accessible in all stations via a DSL line and payroll and policies/procedures were fully accessible. During the storm, the generator located on the 42nd floor was hit by debris and failed. The battery backup system sustained them for another four hours. Radio systems around the area also failed, which rendered mutual aid inoperable. Finally they were successful in getting a channel back in place. The 911 system failed early and they evacuated the center. Phone outage limited future access. The Dispatch Center made out well (6-12 inches of water). The problem was accessing the building. He reported that after the storm, the temporary center was moved from headquarters to Woodland and later moved back to headquarters when Woodland was demobilized. Calls for service were routed through the EOC in the Hyatt. Letters of re-entry were provided to staff but were not honored by the state police. They finally got their radio system back up on the following Thursday and their personnel were allowed back in. This has 17

12 been a slow process and FDNY supplemented the NOFD staffing of the Center. Additional mutual aid requests were made but did not arrive until most of the NOFD personnel returned. The additional resources allowed some personnel to take leave for rest and family. Approximately 60% of the dispatch personnel returned back to their jobs by September 15th. Currently, the CAD system is still down, thus their RMS is still down. They are continuing to operate at NOFD Headquarters. They are trying to get the CAD system back up at Rosedale to at least allow some RMS. Hard drives were removed and have not been replaced. A new 700 MHz system is being proposed and is a multi-site system rather than simulcast. There are some issues with overloading this system from more users with less channel capacity. The cost of this system is approximately $170 million and it is hoped that FEMA will provide the funding. There was discussion of the pros and cons of this system. Some portable radios were lost but exact numbers were not available. During the storm, they ordered and received 300 portables for the emergency operations and mutual aid response. Code Enforcement: Chief Elbert Thomas provided a PowerPoint handout that he reviewed with the group. His current staffing level is the same as pre-katrina. Workload is increasing. He commented that his office and the City Building Department have a good working relationship. Fire Watch staffing guidelines for high rises have been provided to the occupancy in lieu of being staffed by the NOFD in coordination with the State Fire Marshall s Office. Some of his staff was assigned duties in the EOC. Training: Chief Brian Johnson provided an outline handout of his Training Overview Report of pre- and post-katrina, as well as their role during the storm. Additional information was provided following questions. In-service training historically is done in house. Some specialty training is done outside, to include Louisiana State University (LSU). Issues regarding ISO rating improvements focused on recordkeeping. There was some discussion about minimum training standards for the various ranks of the NOFD. State of the City of New Orleans Briefing Deputy CAO Cynthia Sylvain-Lear discussed the re-population process based on those areas less damaged. The biggest challenge currently is the environmental impact. There are areas where the future is unknown. The environmental impact assessment will determine what needs to be done. The public is being asked to return when permitted, and then to have their insurance company conduct an environmental impact analysis to determine if the homes can be saved. The pre-katrina flooding models did not consider the pumps failing and the problems associated with the backflow of water. The 100-year flood plain needs to be revisited and will influence the rebuilding of New Orleans. Ms. Lear s biggest concern is the status of the levies. The Army Corps of Engineers is working closely with the city and attempting to lay out their options for remains and/or reinforcements. There is a date of June 2006 to have the levies completely repaired. Ms. Lear stated that getting the City back is dependent on getting revenue back up, and that is dependent on getting workers back, getting the infrastructure back, and getting tourism back. She passionately said, New Orleans will rebuild but she is uncertain how long it will take and what it will look like. She invited the group back for Mardi Gras in February. The City government has gone from 7,000 to 3,000 employees. The spirit of the workers is still high and the expectation of employees is to do what they are asked to do, even if that may be more than or outside their normal work responsibilities. The City has an opportunity to rebuild better to include residential, commercial, and industrial. An element of this has to do with zoning that does not compromise public safety. The Port is being cleared to get their ship traffic back. This too is a FEMA reimbursable. Public buildings assessment for damage repairs is $313 million. Temporary facilities and temporary housing becomes a transitional necessity. There was some discussion that livable wages should be higher than what public employees are receiving. This is a reality of public employment and the sacrifice that public employees make. City departments have been asked to not rebuild to what they had but to rebuild to how it should be based upon what they need. This will be a dynamic process based upon the restoration of the City and repopulation. Ms. Lear stated that the devastation of New Orleans has a real impact on the state and federal economy. The realty is that New Orleans is not just a party town, but a major contributor to the economy. This is not just lost revenues but the impact of the ports related to petroleum product distribution and other imported products. Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Challenges Analysis The facilitator defined the next critical process for the group to go through to identify the strategic issues faced by the NOFD. A definition of this process was reviewed. One of the commonly performed activities within any conventional planning process is known as a SWOT or SWOC analysis. SWOT is an acronym for strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats. For the term SWOC the C stands for challenges. The purpose of performing this analysis is for the planning group to identify for each of the four categories the respective strengths 18

13 that the organization possesses or has access to; its weaknesses or shortcomings; the opportunities that are present or will exist; and finally, the challenges confronting it. Public Information/Education/Relations Customer Services Fire Protection Systems Each individual of the NOFD planning group first created four lists individually and privately. The facilitator then posted all of the contributions and constructed lists relative to each of the four categories. This was performed without valuing or excessively discussing any listing. Then, the group openly discussed the lists and prioritized what had been contributed. Therefore, the listings reflect a consensus of the group at large regarding the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and challenges for the NOFD. These lists became important to the process as they reinforced the assumptions that the planning group was working with in planning for the future of the NOFD. Planning Issues Following the SWOC analysis, planning issues were then identified and listed to include: Facilities Apparatus/Fleet Equipment Advisability of Additional EMS Delivery Personnel (Wellness and Fitness) Firefighter Health and Safety Training Fire Prevention/Code Enforcement Water Supply Funding/Finance /Budget Public Education/Information CAD/Information Technology Communications Fire Protection Systems Risk Analysis and Coverage (Mutual Aid) Disaster Preparedness (EOC) City Comprehensive Plan Legislative/Legal Issues Labor Relations Pay & Benefits Organizational Structure Identified Strategic Functional Areas Strategic Functional Areas were discussed and identified. Chief Kelvin Cochran of Shreveport, LA presented an example of their Organizational Priorities (Appendix H). After discussion, the following functional areas were identified for NOFD: Human Resource/Programs/Needs Emergency Response/Readiness Professional Knowledge, Skills, and Abilities (KSAs) Equipment/Facilities/Supplies The planning issues identified previously were then inserted into one of these functional areas for the next step of the planning process. Planning Cell Work Groups The facilitator consolidated this list into four planning-cell groups comprised of NOFD and committee members. The planning cell groups were tasked with developing strategic statements and respective goals. This will provide the framework for the further development of objectives for imminent, interim, and long-range planning. The four planning cells were identified as: Human Resources and Professional KSAs Emergency Response/Preparedness and Customer Service Prevention/Protection and PIER Program Equipment/Facilities/Supplies and Administration Support Issues The work of each group was then put into a PowerPoint presentation to be shared with the entire group for feedback. A template was developed for future work by the respective Planning Cells. Phase I wrapped up after the last presentation and there was discussion about this report s format specific to the Executive Summary addressing either questions/answers or problems/solutions. Meeting 2 Activities November 1-2, 2005 This phase of the process was to focus on updating and redefining the timelines, responsible persons, and resources needed to carry out the imminent goals and objectives. The imminent period was previously defined as days that equated to December 3, Superintendent Parent provided further insight to the current situation of the City and what the future may hold for planning purpose. This plan needs to remain flexible since the City s Economic Plan was yet to be published since it is dependent on the unknown commitment of the federal government and the insurance industry. The most significant factor faced now was repopulation. Superintendent Parent reported that only 30% of the structures were in good condition. There remains an issue of getting the people to the jobs or the jobs to the people. People can not return to the City if they do not have a place to stay, a job for income, and basic transportation. The workload of the NOFD for calls is reduced; however, the magnitude of the fires is greater. On personnel issues, Superintendent Parent reported six additional resignations and three pending retirements prior to Katrina. They are forecasting an additional members 19

14 who will be eligible to retire, but the City is unable to pay sick leave and any annual leave cash out. The planning process NOFD has been engaged with thus far has been plagued with competing priorities, which has distracted their staff. One example that Superintendent Parent cited was the phone call earlier in the day from American LaFrance stating that they are stopping their order for replacement apparatus due to funding concerns. Challenges were still being dealt with through FEMA. Given these competing priorities, the group remained flexible to their needs. The Louisiana State Legislature was called into an Extraordinary Session to address Hurricane Katrina disaster issues. Following the review of their agenda, the group heard a presentation from Deputy Chief Mike Love from Montgomery County Fire and Rescue Department (MD), who led their jurisdiction in adopting a residential sprinkler ordinance. Opportunities for code amendments for the City of New Orleans may be opportune at this time. The Planning Cells continued to work on their respective Imminent Actions by Functional Areas goals and objects to report to the plenary committee for finalization of their respective plans. Additional direction was given to provide alternative plans in the event the NOFD budget was reduced. John Granito provided an overview of planning for change to the NOFD based upon economic changes. He led the group through a process of identifying capability that speaks to response time and the arrival of an effective fire force. Next was the capacity to respond to multiple incidents or multi-alarms. He identified five facets that need to be considered: 1. Number of People to be Served (residents/visitors). He discussed the parallel relationship of the City budget to the FD budget as it relates to the fluctuation of population of the City. He stated that the FD population coincides with the City population to be served. He related the situation in Buffalo, New York (an example for comparison) with the decrease in population thus decreasing the size of the FD. 2. Incident Activity or workload is a factor that really needs to increase to warrant the need to maintain funding to support staffing. His group emphasized the need to return to first responder (medical) and other ancillary services to show demand for services. 3. FD Staffing as related above is impacted upon (negatively) by a shrinking economy, population, and workload. 4. Customer Demand and customer service is usually high. The FD needs to ensure their service remains in high demand to justify the funding provided. This is beyond just emergency response. He discussed the FM services, Public Relations, and so on. 5. Legal Obligations is a factor that requires adherence to mandates. He cited an example of work hours in New England requiring spreading hours worked over a mandated 40-hour work week. The implication was to increase staffing to meet this standard. He also routinely cites other mandates and guidelines from OSHA and NFPA The two in/two out rule does not mandate minimum staffing of four but meeting this mandate drives the staffing standard. Additionally, he related to an effective fire force for a single family dwelling not to exceed 1,200 square feet verses high hazard responses such as hospitals or nursing homes. Thus, a baseline number of firefighters are required to hold a fire and prevent loss. Following the discussion of these five factors, he revisited the capability and capacity issue as it relates to what NOFD is responding to and with what resources to ultimately establish a baseline. It s all about educating the policy makers to meet your needs regarding the fire factors above. Along the lines of service delivery, Battalion Chief Steve Strawderman, Prince William County Department of Fire and Rescue, VA, shared his experience as a planning chief and their use of performance measures to establish performance goals and reporting to those measures. He noted that his county is very committed to the public, who is a key stakeholder in the development of the Strategic Plan. Every initiative must link to specific strategic goals and objectives, and system improvement must be reported, through these performance measures reports, to the elected officials and the public. It was announced that the New Orleans Mayor had alerted all departments that the City budget would be cut by approximately one-third. Given this situation, three options needed to be planned for by the Planning Cells. 1. Funding based upon 2005 level or flat funding of $51 million 2. Funding based upon a reduction to $39 million 3. Funding based upon an even significant reduction to $35 million The NOFD went through a similar budge cut in 1986 that lead to lay-offs. A reduction of the NOFD workforce to meet these proposed cuts will have an adverse effect on service delivery. Options were discussed to reduce the workforce, to include evaluating existing vacant positions or reducing staffing standards. John Granito s previous model may be utilized to assess what service could be reduced given the current population reductions in certain areas of the City. In an effort to better analyze the NOFD pre- and post-katrina situation, the facilitator developed an Information/Data Needs document that was provided to the NOFD staff. Input was requested to be sent to Battalion Chief Strawderman for compilation into 20

15 a single report, which will be provided prior to the next scheduled meeting. Meeting 3 (postponed) December 7-9, 2005 This meeting was postponed due to the tragic death of NOFD Captain Richard McCurley. This unfortunate event changed the previous projected completion date of the final report from January to March. An extension was requested of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) for the cooperative agreement funding. FEMA granted the request, extending the completion date to March 31, Meeting 3 (rescheduled) Activities January 17-18, 2006 Charlie Dickinson addressed the group about future changes in the USFA proposed under the acting director of FEMA, R. David Paulison. On behalf of Mr. Paulison, Mr. Dickinson reaffirmed the commitment of FEMA to the NOFD re-building process. Superintendent Parent provided an update on the status of the NOFD. He welcomed the group back and extended his appreciation for the outside support and ideas. Several initiatives and challenges were discussed, including: The NOFD was initially attempting to align with the City reconstitution efforts. Various commissions have come forward with several options for rebuilding the City. There are 209 NOFD personnel being housed on cruise ships, as are a total of 2,900 people. The ships will be pulling out on February 28th. They are seeking alternative housing for City employees (Lakewood). It is not realistic to have the FEMA trailers and infrastructure in place by February 28th. The NOPD is also looking at ways to house their personnel as well. They have arranged for low-interest loans for public safety. One of the best options is to have travel trailers put on their own property. Permits are being accelerated to facilitate this process and FEMA contractors are doing the installation and hook-ups of the utilities. District Chief Steve Schmitt is the FD liaison to facilitate these processes. Neighborhoods have been tasked with committing to rebuild. The challenge with this concept is attempting to organize the neighborhoods to provide a united voice and commitment. Primary economic emphasis is present and will continue to grow. The convention center will be operational by Mardi Gras. Some major groups that have withdrawn from holding their conferences in the City include the IAFC and its Fire-Rescue International Conference. The federal government has committed to rebuild the Levies to a Category 3 criterion. The Fire Station plan for the larger engine houses has been dropped. Chief McConnell s plan for temporary trailers has been moving forward and is being brought in to house personnel at existing stations totaling 16. Attaining permits and getting inspections remain problems. The City is acquiring the Bell South building to provide office space for public safety. There are continued negotiations to this plan that may alter the NOFD occupancy. Structural issues are also being addressed. There is some confusion with the Public Assistant (PA) and Public Worksheet (PW) documents, which provide the means to document specific requests and resources orders. Initial documents are being challenged and FEMA wants accountability for the outstanding $102 million currently committed. Additionally, some PAs may have been lost and some PWs were never written. This has led to a replacement apparatus ordering problem and evictions from leased warehouse space. The NOFD can not initiate these forms themselves and must rely on the City to do so. The state is not allowing any new PWs to be processed until PW-1 has been expended. The insurance industry remains a challenge as to what is being covered under the issued polices. This has led to delays in reconstruction processes. The City has declared that no firefighters will be laid off ; however, there is no new funding for overtime, thus staffing will be affected and some engine houses will go understaffed or unstaffed. They will move to settle on medical retirements pending. There is still no funding to pay for leave cash out; however, additional retirements are expected. Alternatives are being evaluated that may provide retirement credit for leave. There remain some outstanding funding issues for the NOFD pension. The City has not provided any funding for Additionally, they are delinquent $4 million. The pension account is being managed well and investments remain solid. There are preliminary plans for the construction of a new Combined Communications Center for police, fire, and EMS. In the interim, there are updated run cards based upon current apparatus deployment in the City. In summary, the facilitator identified the eight compelling issues faced by the NOFD: 1. Uncertainty of the City s re-population 2. Housing of the NOFD personnel 3. Station rehabilitation plan has been modified to the McConnell Plan 4. Apparatus/equipment resolution 5. Continued daily staffing/operation without overtime funding 6. Future Combined Communications Center 7. NOFD transition to the Bell South Building 8. City pension plan 21

16 A review of the Imminent Goals and Objects, Data Report, and Budget documents were the basis for discussion on future NOFD operations and planning. Response and staffing standards we discussed and compared from the pre-katrina needs and the post-katrina needs. Once Chief McConnell s facility plan is in place, response modeling can be done to validate service delivery to current needs of the City. NFPA 1710 was discussed as a guideline for staffing and defining NOFD s effective fire force on various types of calls. The status of apparatus was reviewed. Additional challenges are faced with the City s inability to pay for services; thus, the private company previously used for apparatus maintenance has stopped service. New apparatus orders remain on hold until the City can fund these expenditures. NOFD continues to work with FEMA on the request that has been submitted to fund their apparatus replacement plan. Station damage cost assessments continue to be reviewed with the FEMA representative to validate the claims and repair costs projected. The domestic water distribution system continues to improve. NOFD personnel are evaluating hydrant pressures regularly and reported to track the status. As the group proceeded in the next planning period, the facilitator defined the need to identify: 1. a service delivery vision (organizational capabilities) by functional area 2. the activities for the remainder of 2006 (interim goals and objectives) 3. contingency planning for further reduction in funding The planning cells prepared to break into their respective functional area groups to focus on the format the facilitator had provided and to prepare a report-out. Superintendent Parent acknowledged the work of the group to provide a framework for his department s future. He said, the department has made it over the hump. The group discussed the need to make recommendations that will make the NOFD better through effective leadership and efficient and safe operations. A compelling question raised by John Granito was, Is it better to arrive faster with less staffing or to arrive slower with more people? He reported that his review of the NFPA Handbook recommends the latter option. Understandably, the decrease in funding is going to force the NOFD to prioritize their efforts and develop contingency plans to adapt to their changing City. It was suggested that the NOFD begin to think beyond just Fire and expand service to include more EMS emphasis. This process of thinking is strategic, and must identify what services are most important, commit to a standard of service delivery, and be accountable to that performance measure. Funding should be adequate to meet these measures. A critical short-term concern was to prepare for the February 28th date. Not only are there increased demands on the NOFD to support Mardi Gras, but this is also the cutoff date for contracted federal resources, such as the cruise ship housing of personnel and helicopter and water tanker/tender resources. The Planning Cells completed their work on their Functional Areas and reported out to the plenary committee. Their documents were edited during the briefings and will be documented in the Long Range Actions by Functional Areas section of this report. It should be noted that due to the time constraints placed on the group because of the postponed meeting, Interim Actions by Functional Areas were consolidated into this section. 22

17 Planning Process Outcomes Imminent Actions by Functional Areas Imminent time frame was defined as those actions needing to be addressed within days, which translated to a calendar date of December 3, Planning Cell members were assigned as follows: Planning Cells - Areas and Assignments Human Resources & Professional KSAs NOFD Norm Woodridge NOFD Terry Hampton NOFD Brian Johnson Committee Kelvin Cochran Emergency Response/Preparedness & Customer Service NOFD Pete Caruso NOFD Tim Papa NOFD Gary Savelle Committee Manny Navarro Committee John Granito Prevention/Protection & PIER Program NOFD Elbert Thomas NOFD Nick Felton NOFD Terry Hardy Committee Dennis Compton Equipment/Facilities/Supplies & Administrative Support Issues NOFD Bruce Martin NOFD Gloria Conneley NOFD Edwin Holmes NFOD Tim McConnell Committee Bill Neville Committee Charles Gaines Floaters NOFD Superintendent Parent Committee Warren McDaniels Committee Chuck Burkell Staff Support IAFC Steve Strawderman IAFC Scott Creason Many of the goals and objectives that were identified were completed and/or delayed based upon competing priorities. Nonetheless, these items were identified in the October and November meetings and will continue to be reported on an ongoing basis. The following is a summarized account of the Imminent Actions by Functional Area. Prevention and Built-in Protection: Goal Statement: Reestablish fire investigation services and public access to fire reports. Move back into headquarters facility Develop alternate system to provide incident reports to public until access to fire records management database is obtained Re-instate fire investigator support services provided by NOFD or arrange for continual alternate service providers Clarify the policy on fire report fees in the imminent future Goal Statement: Organize and manage the permit process. Evaluate and establish procedures for issuing various permits Conduct permit inspection upon request Clarify the policy concerning which permits will be assessed fees Re-establish the process for entering permit information into electronic database Goal Statement: Provide Plans Review services in cooperation with the building department to assist with reentry process. Temporarily relocate Fire Prevention Plan Examiner to building department on a part-time basis Strengthen lines of communication between NOFD and building department and provide joint access to databases Goal Statement: Inspect high-priority occupancies and fire protection systems Prioritize inspectable occupancies Establish inspection criteria and schedule Clarify code enforcement policy/ procedures and fee collection Conduct inspections based on outcome of priorities, criteria, and schedule Maintain database of inspection information Goal Statement: Evaluate water pressure and flow volume in fire protection systems Conduct hydrant flow test for pressure and volume citywide Require businesses to submit Confidence Testing Forms for fire suppression systems Provide mitigating plan for areas with inadequate flow pressures and volume Goal Statement: Determine the status of the pending code adoption process. Clarify pending legal review of amendment package Make revision if necessary and submit to council adoption process Public Information, Education, and Relations Goal Statement: Develop a document outlining safe re-entry requirement. Gather information pertaining to specific risks Produce re-entry document Develop a distribution process Develop a customer service contact process 23

18 Goal Statement: Inform elected officials of key status relating to fire department and needs for the future. Develop a letter outlining issues Distribute letter to all local and state elected officials Develop resolutions outlining goals and objectives Conduct follow-up contacts with elected officials Goal Statement: Implement an aggressive media relation campaign to inform and educate the public about various aspects of the New Orleans Fire Department. Integrate reinforcement of issues and needs into incident reporting Release press briefing covering upcoming events, including progress on fire department restoration Offer five human interest opportunities to highlight members and the department Goal Statement: Develop an initial community relation strategy. Specify the process to obtain information from department and one stop shop concept Utilize radio and print media for distribution of information Coordinate with the New Orleans Convention and Tourism Commission to distribute information about re-entry Equipment, Skills, Facilities, and Administrative Issues Goal Statement: Return existing stations to service (power, sewer). Identify stations NOFD desires to return to service Inspect stations for structural stability Contract for station cleanup (including sanitizing) Goal Statement: Implement temporary stations. Identify sites for temporary stations Gain legal right to occupy identified sites Secure & prepare area for personnel parking at or near sites Direct Corp of Engineers to sites Install station communications Goal Statement: Replace personal protective equipment (SCBA, turnouts, helmets, gloves, hoods, uniforms, etc.) damaged by hurricane Katrina. Survey PPE for replacement need Place order for replacement PPE Distribute PPE Goal Statement: Involve New Orleans Fire Department staff in city-wide recovery planning meetings. Identify and prioritize planning meetings Assign staff for attendance Goal Statement: Attain personnel buy-in for planned programs. Monitor and address station comfort issues Continue station visits by senior staff Continue to award commendations as appropriate Reinstitute annual leave Continue dialog between Management and Local 632 Board Initiate a monthly administration bulletin Goal Statement: Implement Water Tender service in the New Orleans Fire Department Assure funding is in place for apparatus Determine water tender apparatus to be secured for NOFD use Provide radio communications for apparatus Design training program for use of water tenders Initiate water tender training program Human Resources Goal Statement: Maintain critical incident stress management programs through the coordination of Human Resources, IAFF/Local 632, and mental health professionals, and encourage use by all NOFD members. Human Resources will develop and distribute detailed information list of stress management services available to NOFD members; provide list of signs and symptoms of stress reaction Supervisor/members shall monitor members for signs and symptoms of stress reaction and encourage members to seek assistance Goal Statement: NOFD staff and members should work toward improving internal two-way communications through promoting inclusive staff meetings and using inter-office correspondence (IOC). Family Recovery Services: Human Resources will develop and distribute detailed information list NOFD members shall continue to use IOCs for the purpose of disseminating departmental information up and down the organization Superintendent or appointee shall conduct bi-monthly staff meetings with administrative staff 24

19 Emergency Response Readiness and Customer Service Goal Statement: Transition from Katrina ICS & IAP to standard operations procedures. Review SOPs as appropriate to current situation Daily staffing of all fire companies consistent with current incident objectives Manage an interim policy to identify the number of committed fire companies which would trigger the suspension of medical first responder service Respond a safety officer to every 1st alarm assignment with interim guidelines Goal Statement: Ensure adequate resources to accomplish Katrina Incident Special OPS assignments. Daily staff all special units (one rescue squad, one flying squad, one HAZMAT and one USAR Strike Team) Receive assignments from EOC OPS Section Complete Special OPS task as assigned by EOC Establish daily communications between EOC and fire department operations to coordinate Katrina incident activities Goal Statement: Restore fire communications division to pre- Katrina levels. Prepare an estimated medical first response demand and effects on company in service availability Implement an interim manual/electronic communications system to dispatch EMS first response and reinstate fire department first response citywide Implement an interim policy to manage the number of out of service fire companies and determine when to terminate EMS first response Continue to manually operate fire company Validate T-1 line between fire headquarters and dispatch computer Insert hard drive and boot up main dispatch computer Validate connection between (2) dispatch consoles at fire headquarters and the dispatch computer Bring up data collection capacity, namely incident numbers and integration with NOFD fire records system Re-establish New Orleans Maritime Interoperability Committee (NOMIC) interoperability program Goal Statement: Inform all on-duty firefighters and EOC of all hazards in Katrina damaged areas. Complete and distribute daily Katrina status reports Modify existing windshield survey check list (hydrants, high rise, streets, hazardous conditions) Complete windshield survey check list Goal Statement: Manage and coordinate Katrina related fire/rescue operations. Identify forward staging areas for fire/rescue operations Manage national guard/private assets (helicopters, water tenders/tankers) Fill resource orders for logistical support Coordinate Katrina related response with NOFD daily response activities Goal Statement: Manage and coordinate Katrina related search and victim recovery operations within the City of New Orleans. Organize and operate a Victim Locator unit Develop and operate a GIS unit to map/record/track search and recovery activities Complete search for and recovery of victim remains Identify and care for victim remains Notify families of victims Release remains to families Interim Actions by Functional Areas This section was consolidated into the long-term goals due to the cancellation of the December meeting and the uncertainties from the City s restoration plan. Long-Range Actions by Functional Areas New Orleans Fire Department Long-Term Items The following critical areas were identified as directly linked to the strategic direction of NOFD: Class 1 ISO Rating (long-term) Accreditation from the Commission on Fire Accreditation International (long-term) Residential Sprinkler Ordinance Revising SOPs to current activities Policy Committee Firefighter Staffing Fire Apparatus Replacement Facility & Station Renovations Fire Station Location Master Plan Fire Station Refurbishing Professional Development Enhancing EMS Prevention and Built-in Protection The purpose of the fire prevention division is to reduce the incidence of fire through fire code enforcement inspections, the investigation, and arrest of all persons suspected of committing arson, and by enhancing the general public s awareness of the importance of fire prevention and fire safety. Federal/National Standards do not directly mandate or impact local departments. However, studies that are completed federally offer specific broad areas for how to organize service. These studies and reports may be found in American Burning Revisited and Urban Institute documents. The NOFD participates in national data/information exchange networks such as NCIC and AIMS. Additionally, it participates in the NFIRS for its fire reporting. 25

20 Licensing of transportation and use of explosives and pyrotechnics must first comply with ATF, USCC (if on waterways), and State Code. Louisiana State Requirement provided certifying authority, licensing criteria, and reporting requirements to include: State Certification and Training standards (required by law) Peace Officer Standards and Training Inspection Reporting Requirements Drives local reporting Maintenance of files Fire Fatality Reporting Licensing All fire protection/system installers Pyrotechnic/firework licensing Property Insurance Association of Louisiana New Orleans Local Requirements ensure the final level of Fire Prevention and Protection compliance to the citizens of New Orleans to include: City Fire Prevention Code by reference of typical standards such as NFPA, ANSI, and ASTM Inspection Requirements Investigation Requirements Civil Service Requirements for employment Organizational Guidelines and Standards for Inspections and Investigations by reference to NFPA 921, 1031, and 1033 The following sub-areas are designated to assist in achieving the overall strategy of the Fire Prevention Division. 1. Benchmarks and requirement in Fire Service Accreditation Process a. List all benchmarks as a checklist for Fire Prevention Division items in the accreditation process. i. These benchmarks serve as a guide to satisfy all areas that have been documented to assure proper provision of Fire Prevention Services. ii. List each benchmark as an objective iii. These benchmarks may identify further or reinforce those that are listed below. 2. Staffing Resources increase a. Add staff fire protection engineer b. Add dedicated fire investigation staff c. Use field staff to increase completion of building inspections. 3. Inspect all structures in the jurisdiction every year a. Use fire companies to inspect all inspectable properties in each District i. Resume the Company Inspection plan in place (pre-katrina) 4. Assure adequate training and certification of all staff completing inspections a. Company Officer inspector certification by District b. Complete inspector training of last district c. Incorporate Inspector I and Investigation training in promotional requirements (add one week to promotional training). d. Require minimum of Inspector I for Fire Prevention Division. 5. Enhance integration between Fire Prevention and Suppression a. Strategies to be developed 6. Increase requirement of automatic sprinkler systems in targeted occupancies. a. Assembly b. Multi-family c. Single family d. Increase marketing of life safety through fire engineered environment i. Increased firefighter safety ii. Increased occupant safety The NOFD will continue ongoing evaluation and implementation of imminent and interim strategies. Imminent include the continued restoration of code enforcement, plans review, and fire investigation services, and ensuring the operational readiness of fire protection systems and features in support of a safe re-population of the city. Interim includes the integration of the City s current or revised master plan for redevelopment and growth with fire protection ordinance and legislation. The NOFD, if faced with a reduction in current funds, will: 1. Continue inspection of commercial properties as they reopen for public safety. 2. Continue inspection of assembly occupancies in the French Quarter. 3. Continue plans review and inspections of trailer sites to ensure fire protection issues are addressed. 4. Continue to monitor debris and landfill sites. 5. Continue vigilant and aggressive fire investigation. The NOFD Prevention Division Long Term strategy is to provide a comprehensive code management and enforcement program that results in a built environment that is code compliant and includes both active and passive built-in fire protection features for commercial and residential occupancies. Another goal is to embrace the recommendations of established professional studies, reports, and reference guides such as Commission on Fire Accreditation International, NFPA 921, EFO papers, America Burning Recommissioned, Urban Institute studies, and Tri-Data studies. 26

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