FROM HOPE TO HARVEST AGENCY STRATEGY

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1 FROM HOPE TO HARVEST AGENCY STRATEGY

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3 TABLE OF CONTENTS SECTION I: OUR FOUNDATION Letter from Dr. Carolyn Y. Woo, President & CEO...3 Introduction: A Force for Lasting and Positive Change...4 Our Mission and Guiding Principles...7 SECTION II: OUR ASPIRATIONS Our Theory of Change and Intended Impact...8 Environmental Scan...11 Our Aspirations...13 SECTION III: OUR STRATEGIC PRIORITIES Signature Program Areas...16 Core Competencies Engaging the Global Church...22 A High-Performance Culture...24 Resource Mobilization SECTION IV: OUR COMMITMENT Conclusion...28 Mission Statement...29 EX Catholic Relief Services. All Rights Reserved. 1

4 2 Our Foundation

5 LETTER FROM DR. CAROLYN Y. WOO PRESIDENT & CEO Catholic Relief Services exists to bring God s love to poor and vulnerable people around the world. This would not be possible without faith, our anchor and guide in this rapidly changing environment. Faith inevitably points to hope, allowing us to envision and bring about a better world. Faith also demands our fullest commitment to our mission the effort that turns hope into harvest. The purpose of this strategy is to provide the blueprint for moving forward in a time of challenge and transition. It calls us to strive for excellence in order to reap the harvest of lasting and positive change. At CRS, we have been given so much. Our institutional donors, individual benefactors and partners have invested their resources and trust in our mission. We have deep relationships with sister institutions of the Catholic Church in the United States and around the world. Our 5,000 colleagues make us proud of the way they give of their total selves. Yet our faith calls us to continue to invest all of these gifts in ways that will generate the greatest results: to reach new levels of excellence that have lasting impact on the lives of those God has entrusted to our care. May blessings overflow, Whatever you did for one of these least brothers of mine, you did for me. Matthew 25:40 Dr. Carolyn Y. Woo President & CEO Our Foundation 3

6 INTRODUCTION: A FORCE FOR LASTING AND POSITIVE CHANGE The United States Conference of Catholic Bishops founded Catholic Relief Services in 1943 to express the Gospel call to love poor and vulnerable people through acts of charity and the pursuit of justice. Since then, CRS has evolved into an international humanitarian organization of more than 5,000 people, working in 91 countries and serving more than 100 million people annually. CRS programs serve based on need, reaching poor and vulnerable women, men, girls and boys overseas without regard to race, sex, nationality or religion. 4 Our Foundation ATION

7 This agency strategic plan was developed during the 2012 calendar year and included extensive consultation, reflection and analysis that involved CRS staff around the world, our board of directors, public and private donors, technical specialists and partners. Through a process of debate and analysis, we believe we have identified those areas of strategic focus that will best position us for future success in advancing our mission. At a time of rapid change around the world, CRS continues to build on a strong foundation of Catholic teachings and values while leveraging deep experience, a breadth of relationships across the globe and a deeply committed staff. CRS seeks to significantly improve the lives of poor and vulnerable people around the world by increasing our impact and influence through a set of new strategic priorities that both challenge and inspire us. We do this in close collaboration with sister institutions of the global Catholic Church, the Catholic community in the United States, a vast and diverse range of partners and donors, and, most important, the families and communities we serve around the world. Every economic and political theory or action must set about providing each inhabitant of the planet with the minimum wherewithal to live in dignity and freedom, with the possibility of supporting a family, educating children, praising God and developing one s own human potential. Pope Francis Our Foundation 5

8 6 Our Foundation

9 OUR MISSION AND GUIDING PRINCIPLES MISSION Our mission is fundamental to what we do and how we work. In carrying out the commitment of the Bishops of the United States to assist poor and vulnerable people overseas, we act to: Promote human development by responding to major emergencies, fighting poverty, and nurturing peaceful and just societies Inspire and engage Catholics in the United States as they live their faith in solidarity with their brothers and sisters around the world Work with local, national and international Catholic institutions and structures, as well as other organizations, to assist people on the basis of need, not race, sex, nationality or religion GUIDING PRINCIPLES Our Guiding Principles draw upon a rich tradition of Catholic moral and social teaching, and articulate values that are common across many religious and cultural traditions. Acting as a guide to what a just world might look like, these principles express values that are shared among people who seek to promote and work toward true justice and lasting peace. Our guiding principles are: Sacredness and Dignity of the Human Person Rights and Responsibilities Social Nature of Humanity The Common Good Subsidiarity Solidarity Option for the Poor Stewardship Our Foundation 7

10 OUR THEORY OF CHANGE AND INTENDED IMPACT Since the early 2000s, CRS has applied a theory of change grounded in the concept of integral human development (IHD), which promotes the good of the whole person and every person. IHD supports the ability of each individual to realize their full human potential in the context of just and peaceful relationships, a thriving environment and solidarity with others. This goal for individuals and society is a long-term, dynamic process, whereby actors work collaboratively from across civil society and the public and private sectors, operating at different levels individual, family, community, regional, national and international to: Protect human life and dignity by caring for poor and vulnerable people Increase resilience by protecting, building and maximizing family and community human, social, political, physical, financial, natural and spiritual assets Promote right relationships between all people, and within and across families, communities and nations Increase equitable and inclusive access to and influence on structures and systems at all levels WHAT IS INTEGRAL HUMAN DEVELOPMENT? IHD is a holistic approach to development that promotes the good of the whole person and every person. The intended impact of IHD is for people to reach their full potential in an atmosphere of peace, social justice and human dignity. 8 Our Aspirations

11 KEY ELEMENTS OF THE IHD FRAMEWORK ASSETS We help people assess what resources they have access to, such as homes, crops, money, health, faith or education. SYSTEMS & STRUCTURES We assist people as they map how societies are organized in systems and structures. OUTCOMES & FEEDBACK INFLUENCE & ACCESS We monitor the results and help find ways to address people s needs, reinforcing their capacities and ability to influence. INTEGRAL HUMAN DEVELOPMENT We help people identify who has power to influence systems and structures. STRATEGIES We seek to understand people s strategies for improving their lives and preparing for the future. RISK & VULNERABILITY We help people identify threats to their lives and livelihoods so they can build their resilience. Our Aspirations 9

12 HOW WE ACHIEVE OUR INTENDED IMPACT CRS contributes our unique expertise and relationships to the realization of integral human development through the following actions across the agency to: Build capacity of our partners and ourselves to increase opportunities for people to live to their full human potential by supporting families and communities to move from vulnerability to resilience through equitable and inclusive livelihood strategies Prove and take to scale evidence-based approaches that respond to local needs and foster local leadership Cultivate strong relationships for effective collaboration, mutual learning, joint leadership and local innovation across the global network of Catholic organizations and individuals who share our vision of IHD Build connections across the public and private sectors and civil society to create lasting, positive solutions to poverty and injustice Influence policies and practices that promote IHD Key trends: Economic pressures on government and other funding sources; increase in direct funding to local organizations; demands for greater accountability and scalable solutions 10 Our Aspirations IRATIONS

13 ENVIRONMENTAL SCAN CRS engaged in a comprehensive review of the major trends facing poor and vulnerable people outside the United States, key changes in the international relief and development environment, and opportunities for us to advance our mission in light of these trends and changes. The world has made unprecedented progress in reducing poverty over the past three decades. In 1990, more than 1.8 billion people lived in extreme poverty. By 2010, that number was estimated to have dropped to 1.2 billion. Although there is much to celebrate and learn from this success, more than 1 billion people continue to experience daily deprivations of extreme poverty that impede their development and potential. At a more macro level, these include the growing numbers of the poor living in countries that are middle income, fragile or in conflict; the more than 850 million chronically food insecure people who go to bed hungry every night; and the high price the poor are paying for climate change as land degradation and droughts lead to increased potential for ethnic and political tensions and conflict over scarce natural resources.. At the same time, the environment in which we work is also changing including the policies and resources that affect poor and vulnerable people, and the ability of organizations such as CRS to work effectively. Current trends include continuing fiscal and economic pressures on U.S. government and other important foreign aid; an increase in direct funding to local governments and civil society organizations; and emerging new players and new donor models. Donors in general are demanding better accountability and scalable solutions. With our understanding of the environment, the social mission of the Catholic Church and CRS unique organizational attributes, we will benefit from key opportunities to advance our mission in the coming years. Our faith-inspired mission and values appeal to diverse donors and individuals, and our broad and deep network of local partners especially in the Caritas Internationalis family provides a platform for scale, impact and influence. Our depth of experience and technical expertise foster innovation and learning. The challenges of global poverty and injustice are complex and multidimensional, but there are proven ways to address them. In the end, the faces of poverty are as profound and complex as the hopes and aspirations of human beings. But we also know from experience that the human spirit is remarkably resilient, and poor people and countries, in partnership with people of goodwill around the globe, can alleviate poverty and help people to flourish. Our Aspirations 11

14 12 Our Aspirations

15 OUR ASPIRATIONS Over the next 5 years, we will increase our impact and outreach to those in need and aspire to: Empower 150 million poor and vulnerable people overseas through continuously improving programs that respond to emergencies, strengthen the health, well-being and livelihoods of families and communities, and nurture peaceful and just societies Inspire and engage more than 10 million Catholics in the United States to take action in solidarity with poor and vulnerable people overseas as an integral part of their faith 5 years 150 million people around the world 10 million Catholics in the U.S. Our Aspirations 13

16 THE ACHIEVEMENT OF OUR ASPIRATIONS WILL BE DRIVEN BY THE FOLLOWING FOUR STRATEGIC PRIORITIES: Attain leadership in signature program areas for greater impact and influence Deepen expertise in 5 targeted core competencies across CRS Strengthen engagement in the United States and overseas with sister Catholic Church organizations and individuals to promote integral human development Reinforce an organizational culture of high performance and accountability We will align our approach to resource mobilization to reinforce our ability to succeed with the four strategic priorities above. 14 Our Strategic Priorities

17 AGENCY STRATEGY BY 2018, CATHOLIC RELIEF SERVICES ASPIRES TO SERVE 150 MILLION POOR AND VULNERABLE PEOPLE WORLDWIDE WHILE INSPIRING 10 MILLION CATHOLICS IN THE UNITED STATES TO PUT THEIR FAITH INTO ACTION. TO DO THIS, WE WILL: ACHIEVE LEADERSHIP IN 3SIGNATURE PROGRAM AREAS: Emergency Response & Recovery Agricultural Livelihoods Health DEEPEN EXPERTISE IN 5 CORE COMPETENCIES: Partner Collaboration & Support Justice and Peacebuilding Integration Monitoring & Evaluation, Accountability and Learning Information and Communications Technology for Development Global Brand Management STRENGTHEN ENGAGEMENT WITH THE GLOBAL CATHOLIC CHURCH TO: Promote integral human development and global solidarity Deepen collaborative relationships and build networks Inspire and engage Catholics in the United States to confront global poverty REINFORCE A HIGH-PERFORMANCE CULTURE CHARACTERIZED BY: Maintaining a one agency perspective of our identity, mission and work Operational excellence Staff development & engagement Accountability for outcomes Resource mobilization: These strategic priorities will be supported by maximizing and optimizing our financial resources to meet agency needs. Our Strategic Priorities 15

18 SIGNATURE PROGRAM AREAS CRS takes a holistic approach to relief and development, with 9 fields of expertise: agriculture, education, emergencies, health, HIV and AIDS, microfinance, peacebuilding, water and social safety nets. We strive for excellence in all that we do, ensuring the programs we support in these fields of expertise are community based, participatory, equitable and results driven. 3 SIGNATURE PROGRAM AREAS: Emergency Response & Recovery Agricultural Livelihoods Health In our new strategy, we will invest to increase our impact and influence by deepening our expertise and performing at a world-class level in the following three signature program areas, or SPAs: emergency response and recovery, agricultural livelihoods and health. Informed by our theory of change, the SPAs reflect where CRS can most effectively contribute to integral human development. Implementation will include: Strengthen staff and partner capacity Build strategic partnerships and networks Innovate and scale up Implement high-quality monitoring & evaluation, accountability and learning Advocate for just structures and policies Work smarter through better systems and processes Market and communicate our successes Raise more resources Each SPA comprises a broad range of sectoral interventions. The bullets in the diagram on the next page represent areas of particular strategic investment within each SPA. The expected outcome is to reach more poor and vulnerable people with evidence-based participatory, equitable, efficient and holistic interventions that leverage systemic sectoral and policy improvements for lasting, positive change. 16 Our Strategic Priorities

19 SIGNATURE PROGRAM AREAS AND INVESTMENT PRIORITIES The bullets below represent areas of particular investment within the broader sectors. Peacebuilding Water HIV and AIDS Microfinance Social Safety Net Education Our Strategic Priorities 17

20 CORE COMPETENCIES A core competency is a specific capability that is central to the success of an organization and is applicable across a broad range of programs. We have identified the following core competencies for deeper cultivation and investment during this strategy period. PARTNER COLLABORATION AND SUPPORT It is only through strong collaborative relationships across civil society and the public and private sectors that lasting, positive solutions to poverty and injustice can be achieved. CRS has worked for many years to connect the dots across myriad stakeholders from local Church partners and governments to small-scale farmers and international businesses to promote collaborative, mutually beneficial relationships. We will continue to promote this type of cross-sector engagement in our new strategy, with a particular focus on deepening our expertise in engaging more effectively with the private sector and universities to benefit the poor and vulnerable. As a faith-based, private organization, CRS is committed to supporting local civil society actors, including 5 CORE COMPETENCIES: Catholic Church and community-based Partner Collaboration & Support organizations, to strengthen their capacity to contribute to lasting and meaningful Justice and Peacebuilding social change. Local partnerships foster Integration greater understanding of local needs and context, and allow for more appropriate, Monitoring & Evaluation, equitable and sustainable solutions. Accountability and Learning Through creation of a new Institute for Information & Communications Capacity Strengthening within CRS, we seek to transform how we engage with Technology for Development local partners by equipping staff with the Global Brand Management necessary knowledge and skills to respond to specific organizational needs and provide exemplary technical support. The institute will document CRS and our partners co-created, shared, and applied learning and innovation from capacity strengthening efforts with an eye toward contributing to the broader development community s knowledge. 18 Our Strategic Priorities

21 JUSTICE AND PEACEBUILDING INTEGRATION At the heart of the social mission of the Catholic Church is a call to work for justice and peace. Cultivating just and peaceful societies is part of our mission statement and an essential component of integral human development. To strengthen the application of the integral human development approach, we are committed to intensifying our efforts to integrate justice and peacebuilding into our work. We seek to address social equity and inclusion along the lines of sex, age, ethnicity, race and religion. We will ensure that staff and partners have the skills and tools to Conduct sound conflict analysis (identification of the key parties, problems and processes) as the foundation for both peacebuilding and conflict sensitivity Conduct rigorous power analysis to ensure clear understanding of relationships among women, men, girls and boys in order to design programs that promote equitable relationships Ensure that our relief and development programs identify ways for the people we serve to increase equitable and inclusive access to and influence on systems and structures that affect their lives MONITORING & EVALUATION, ACCOUNTABILITY AND LEARNING Our commitment to operational and programmatic excellence demands continuous improvement in our ability to document, analyze and apply learning at the project, sector and agency levels, and to share that learning with stakeholders, practitioners and policymakers. 19 Our OUR Strategic ST Priorities

22 20 Our Strategic Priorities

23 CRS will invest in an agency-wide monitoring & evaluation, accountability and learning system for overseas programming to improve our ability to: Provide effective feedback mechanisms for program beneficiaries Systematically measure results, incorporate and document experiential learning Optimize use of technology to improve the accuracy, timeliness and accessibility of monitoring & evaluation data Facilitate decisions based on evidence and learning Share our learning with the broader development community and policymakers INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY FOR DEVELOPMENT Information and Communications Technology for Development, or ICT4D, harnesses the potential of technology to improve both operational and programmatic aspects of our work. CRS is an emerging leader in this area, having rapidly built our capabilities through field-driven project needs and ideas, coupled with thought leadership and technical support sourced internally and from a broad base of partners. In this next strategy period, we will: Play a leadership role in fostering knowledge exchange in the field of relief and development on the successful use of ICT4D Expand CRS portfolio of field-tested ICT4D solutions by focusing on projects that increase innovation and technical excellence in our signature program areas, or SPAs Build the capacity to support CRS projects and a wide variety of partner institutions in adapting these solutions and taking them to scale, when appropriate for their programs GLOBAL BRAND MANAGEMENT We will launch an agency-wide initiative to strengthen our ability to communicate a coherent and consistent picture of who we are, what we do, how we do it and the results we achieve to our many stakeholders, including our staff, donors, partners, technical networks and constituents in the United States and in the 91 countries in which we serve. In communicating more effectively and engagingly about our work, we hope to: Connect Catholics in the United States intellectually, emotionally and spiritually to CRS, encouraging them to become more deeply involved in our mission Engender respect for the values we espouse, the quality of our work, the integrity and commitment of our staff, and the strength of our relationships Position CRS among donor governments and foundations as an agency that delivers results, especially for our signature program areas Our Strategic Priorities 21

24 ENGAGING THE GLOBAL CHURCH The Catholic Church is one of the most influential forces for positive and lasting change in the world. The depth and breadth of Catholic social ministries around the world is beyond comparison. As the official overseas relief and development agency of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, we engage with other Catholic institutions both overseas and in the United States. Our Church relationships are most dynamic and enriching when there is mutual learning, joint action and joint reflection. We will continue our efforts to strengthen the capacity of the global Catholic Church to have an influential voice and play a transformative role on behalf of poor and marginalized people. IN THE UNITED STATES Our work in the United States both complements and supports our work overseas. As a part of the Catholic Church, we work with dioceses, parishes, schools and organizations to offer Catholics concrete ways to live their faith and contribute to the progress of the world, as Pope Benedict XVI urged in his message on the World Day of Peace in To inspire more than 10 million Catholics to act in solidarity with poor and vulnerable people overseas, CRS will educate and engage Catholics in the United States through a variety of programs and events that link with our work overseas. Essential to this work is our support to dioceses and other institutions of the Church across the country to build ongoing, sustainable structures and capacities focused on reaching Catholics in the pews. Through programs such as CRS Rice Bowl, we involve millions of Catholics in the United States in praying, learning, acting and giving to help those we serve overseas. Of particular emphasis during this strategy period are our efforts to address the unique aspects of the growing Catholic Hispanic community in the U.S. to engage in our mission and the creation of university-based core programs to educate students about global poverty issues and provide them opportunities to get involved in our work. 22 OUR Our STRATEGIC Strategic PRIORITIES Priorities

25 OVERSEAS CRS fundamental identity as part of the universal Catholic Church implies that national Church organizations we work with around the world are much more than partners. They are our sister agencies in one human family. Our support for Church partners is measured not only by improvements in their organizational sustainability and the quality of their programs, but also by the nature and quality of our relationships. In this area, we will focus on ensuring that our staff has the knowledge and skills to build and foster strong relationships with Church partners to more effectively and collaboratively strengthen our services to poor and vulnerable people, and address the root causes of poverty and injustice. CRS Rice Bowl is a program that parishes, schools, religious education programs and families in the U.S. use during Lent to learn about hunger and poverty around the world. Our Strategic Priorities 23

26 A HIGH- PERFORMANCE CULTURE Our aspirations and priorities call for a high-performance organizational culture characterized by the norms, expectations and ethos of CRS. These include: CRS as one agency, operational excellence, staff engagement and development, and accountability for outcomes. ONE AGENCY CRS has a distinct culture with strong cohesion surrounding, and deep commitment to, our mission and values. Our agency strategy provides the opportunity to build on the strengths of our traditions while forging new approaches that will bring out the best in our culture and people to serve our mission and act as one agency. To be greater than the sum of our parts, we will deepen understanding of and create new opportunities to celebrate our mission and Catholic identity across the agency and to foster more effective collaboration and communication across divisions and between the field and headquarters. OPERATIONAL EXCELLENCE Achieving operational excellence in other words, continually improving our efficiency and effectiveness in a spirit of collaboration, innovation and good stewardship of resources is an ongoing and essential part of our work. Aspects of this work include our commitment to streamlining and standardizing core business processes and ensuring optimal use of agency systems to facilitate knowledge management and sharing, collaboration across teams and geographies, high-quality analysis and reporting, aligned operational planning and well-informed decision making. STAFF ENGAGEMENT AND DEVELOPMENT To continue to be competitive and effective, our approach to people and organizational culture must lead to excellence in all aspects of our work. CRS needs individual staff members with the skills and capacities to meet the constantly evolving demands of our work. To this end, we will create an integrated and role-based workforce development program tied to performance 24 Our Strategic Priorities

27 5,000 people 91 countries 1 agency Our Strategic Priorities 25

28 26 Our Strategic Priorities

29 and career management. We will maximize technology and other approaches to support blended and distance learning curricula that can reach staff across the agency. Equally important will be our commitment to more creative internal communications to facilitate our staff s ability to understand the agency s strategic priorities and how they can contribute to their successful implementation. ACCOUNTABILITY To strengthen our accountability for results to our stakeholders and each other, we will strengthen our performance management system to facilitate alignment of divisional, team, and individual goals and objectives to agency strategic priorities. To support the ability of agency leadership and staff to contribute to the results we seek, we will create a framework of indicators to capture and regularly monitor and update progress on strategy implementation. RESOURCE MOBILIZATION It is critically important that CRS continues to improve our private and public fundraising efforts to ensure the agency s ability to fulfill our mission in an increasingly competitive environment. This includes meeting the highest standards of stewardship to optimize the resources entrusted to us. By demonstrating programmatic excellence to our institutional donors and inspiring generosity from our private donors, we will maximize resources to achieve our aspirations to reach more people than ever. Our Strategic Priorities 27

30 CONCLUSION This document represents the strategic framework and priorities for Catholic Relief Services over the next 5 years. We have great strengths on which to build. Our Catholic identity, mission and guiding principles, and our commitment to integral human development lay a strong foundation for guiding and inspiring our work. We are blessed with strong relationships and partnerships, generous donors, loyal supporters and talented staff dedicated to excellence in all aspects of fulfilling our mission. We are confident that successful implementation of our new strategic priorities will deepen our ability to contribute to lasting, positive change in the lives of poor and vulnerable people around the world transforming hope into harvest wherever we work. We consider it a privilege to serve the common good and pledge to do so with uncommon excellence. PHOTOS BY: Sara A. Fajardo/CRS (cover, 2, 5, 23) Silverlight for CRS (inside front cover, 10, 12) Karen Kasmauski for CRS (6, 19, 22, 25) David Snyder/CRS (4) Helen Blakesley/CRS (20) Sam Tarling for CRS (26) 28 Our Commitment

31 MISSION STATEMENT CATHOLIC RELIEF SERVICES carries out the commitment of the Bishops of the United States to assist the poor and vulnerable overseas. We are motivated by the Gospel of Jesus Christ to cherish, preserve and uphold the sacredness and dignity of all human life, foster charity and justice, and embody Catholic social and moral teaching as we act to: Promote human development by responding to major emergencies, fighting disease and poverty, and nurturing peaceful and just societies; and Serve Catholics in the United States as they live their faith in solidarity with their brothers and sisters around the world. As part of the universal mission of the Catholic Church, we work with local, national and international Catholic institutions and structures, as well as other organizations, to assist people on the basis of need, not creed, race or nationality. APPROVED BY THE CATHOLIC RELIEF SERVICES BOARD OF DIRECTORS ON SEPTEMBER 11, Our Commitment 29

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