BY WARREN KAGARISE. Kappler, a longtime councilman, was first elected in His opponents for the Position 7 seat. in a June 6 to The Press.

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1 Designer builds treehouses See Page B4 Skyline quarterback Jake Heaps commits to play football at BYU Sports, Page C1 Issaquah woman trains for marathon with new lungs Community, Page B1 THEISSAQUAHPRESS Locally owned since Cents New business plaza planned See Page A6 Wednesday, June 10, 2009 Vol. 110, No. 23 Candidates file for City Council, school board, more Mayor Frisinger unopposed BY WARREN KAGARISE AND CHANTELLE LUSEBRINK Mayor Ava Frisinger will run unopposed for a fourth term and seven City Council candidates will battle for four seats, according to unofficial King County Elections filings. The deadline for candidate filing was 4:30 p.m. June 5. During the five-day filing period, Frisinger, seven council candidates and three Issaquah School Board hopefuls declared their candidacies for the nonpartisan seats. Candidates have until June 11 to withdraw. Council incumbents Eileen Barber, David Kappler and Maureen McCarry entered the race. Newcomers Mark Mullet, Joan Probala, Tola Marts and Nathan Perea will seek council seats as well. Candidates running unopposed could still face challenges from write-in candidates. The last day to file for election as a write-in candidate is Aug. 17. The primary election will be held Aug. 18; the general election is Nov. 3. Barber, a former Greater Issaquah Chamber of Commerce president, was elected in She will run unopposed for a second term as the Position 3 councilwoman, according to county filings. Kappler, a longtime councilman, was first elected in His opponents for the Position 7 seat See CANDIDATES, Page A3 John Rittenhouse bows out BY WARREN KAGARISE John Rittenhouse opted last week not to seek another City Council term but the first-term councilman said he plans to return to city politics. Rittenhouse said the time constraints of serving as a councilman have led him to re-evaluate a reelection bid. He explained his reasons in a June 6 to The Press. There are several things that I ve been wanting to do in the last year or so that I have had to put off because of time constraints from serving on the council, Rittenhouse wrote. I had decided not to run for re-election, so that I can get caught up on those things I need to take care of. He indicated he could run for city office in the future, possibly as early as the next municipal election in My wife has encouraged me not to throw out my old campaign signs, he wrote. If in the next year or two, I can finish those things I have been deferring, I will look forward to asking the citizens of Issaquah for the privilege of serving them again in the next election cycle. Issaquah Highlands resident Mark Mullet is running unopposed for the seat held by Rittenhouse. Candidates can withdraw from the race until June 11, and candidates running unopposed could still face challenges from write-in See RITTENHOUSE, Page A3 Brian Yorkey wins Tony for best lyrics PHOTOS BY ADAM ESCHBACH A roarin day at the park At top, spectators watch from the shores of Lake Sammamish as hydroplanes race by at speeds exceeding 130 mph in the Grand Prix finals at Tastin n Racin. The June 6 events brought in more than 18,000 visitors. Far right, Kirk, Shelly and Nolin Brown (from left) watch the hydroplane races while enjoying corndogs, ice cream and root beer floats. Below right, 2-year-old Kai Hogan-Emmons, from Greenlake, plays on an inflatable slide at one of the event s many activities geared toward children. Getting ready to dance with a beer in one hand, a couple enjoys themselves to the music of the band Slacker in the beer gardens. See a video from inside a hydroplane at The Village Originals musical Next To Normal took home three Tony Awards at the 63rd Annual Tony Awards Ceremony June 7. The awards were Best Original Score (music by Tom Kitt; lyrics by Brian Yorkey), B e s t Performance by a Leading Actress in a Musical (Alice Ripley) and Best Orchestrations (Michael Starobin and Kitt). Brian Yorkey Next To Normal (formerly titled Feeling Electric ) began as a staged reading at Village Theatre in March The creative team went on to develop the production further as a Village Originals workshop in June Yorkey, former associate artistic director for Village Theatre, was a pioneering force behind the kids program KIDSTAGE. Next to Normal started at Village Theatre and I started at Village Theatre, and this just seems like a great night to celebrate Village s commitment to new musicals, Yorkey said. I was so glad to have Robb there to cheer us on, and celebrate, and I m proud to say that Village Theatre is a big part of the Next to Normal story. It was exciting to be there to support Brian and Tom, and wonderful for Village Theatre to be recognized, said Robb Hunt, the theater s executive producer. Yorkey will be with Village Theatre this summer to direct one of the six new works included in the ninth annual Festival of New Musicals. He is also set to direct Lost In Yonkers, the third production in Village Theatre s Season line-up. School buses evacuated to escape nearby brush fire BY ADAM ESCHBACH A brush fire at the Issaquah School District Transportation Center prompted the evacuation of 20 school buses from the burning area at about 11:40 a.m. June 2. INSIDE THE PRESS The flames were put out by 11:55 a.m. I thought that a bus was on fire. There was a large billow of black smoke, said Jesse Provine, a mechanic at the transportation center and the first on the scene. Provine warned transit center A&E B6 Classifieds... D4-5 Community... B1 Obituaries.... B3 Opinion A4 Police & Fire.. C5 Schools C6 Sports..... C1-2 staff to start moving buses, called Eastside Fire & Rescue and by the time he arrived back on the scene with a fire extinguisher, the brush fire had jumped the curb and was See FIRE, Page A3 YOU SHOULD KNOW Seniors and disabled people may qualify for a property tax exemption. An owner is exempt from all excess and special levies, and possibly regular levies. The exemption is available to people 61 and older with an annual household income of $35,000 or less. A payment deferral program is available for seniors and disabled people earning up to $40,000. Call the King County Tax Advisor s Office at to learn more. 27-year-old Issaquah man dies in Hobart Road rollover BY KATHLEEN R. MERRILL AND WARREN KAGARISE A 27-year-old Issaquah man died late June 5 near the church where he was baptized when his sport-utility vehicle veered off the road and rolled several times in the block of Issaquah- Hobart Road. Christopher M. Leslie died at the accident scene from head injuries, according to the King County Medical Examiner s Office. Witnesses who called police after the accident told officers they saw the vehicle moving at high speed and then crash. Officers Last Week s Rainfall: (through Monday) 0.01 inches Total for 2009: inches Total last year: (through June 8) inches RAIN GAIN arrived at the scene at about 11:25 p.m. There were no passengers in the vehicle, a maroon 1999 Subaru Forester. Flowers adorned a makeshift memorial at the scene, on the east GAS GAUGE BEST LOCAL PRICES * $2.67 Arco 1403 N.W. Sammamish $2.67 Costco HIGHEST LOCAL PRICE * $2.81 Chevron 25 N.W. Gilman Blvd. See ROLLOVER, Page A Best local prices Costco Arco To report gas prices in your area, go to

2 A2 Wednesday, June 10, 2009 BY WARREN KAGARISE Two of six vehicles parked along Klahanie Drive Southeast still sit after being smashed into by a 29-year-old Bellevue man driving under the influence of alcohol May 22, according to the King County Sheriff s Office. Drunken driver hits vehicles in Klahanie BY WARREN KAGARISE Several Klahanie residents had a rude awakening last month after a drunk driver smashed into parked vehicles just after midnight May 22. Sgt. John Urquhart, King County Sheriff s Office spokesman, said a man heard screeching tires and a crash near Summerwalk Apartments, 3850 Klahanie Drive S.E., at about 12:30 a.m. When deputies arrived, they discovered a damaged maroon Dodge pickup. The driver had sideswiped six vehicles parked along Klahanie Drive Southeast. Urquhart said the crash caused at least $10,000 worth of damage. After the accident, the driver a 29-year-old Bellevue man got out of the truck to retrieve some items from the truck bed. He and his female passenger then walked off. He was charged with driving under the influence, driving with a suspended license and leaving the scene of an accident. Law enforcement officials have not released his name. Urquhart said a blood-alcohol level was not available for the driver. The legal limit is.08 percent. Most of the damaged cars were still parked along tree-lined Klahanie Drive Southeast last week. Broken glass surrounded a maroon Saturn sedan with a shattered rear window. A driver s side mirror hung limply from the car. A blue Dodge Durango was damaged as well. The rear driver s side tire on the sport utility vehicle was also flattened during the accident. A maroon Toyota Corolla was struck and had its driver s side mirror clipped. A damaged tailgate on a red Ford F-150 appeared to be another sign of the accident. Except for the F-150, the vehicles were parked on the east side of the street. Some of the vehicle owners are residents of the nearby Summerwalk Apartments. Reach Reporter Warren Kagarise at , ext. 234, or Comment on this story at Deadline extended for Salmon Days artists The deadline has been extended to June 25 for area artists to create a special artist edition retail item for this year s Issaquah Salmon Days Festival. Festival organizers will not produce a limited-edition print this year, but are instead having someone create a retail item for the festival s 40th year. Artists are invited to submit artwork for this special project. Artwork should reflect the festival and the salmon (returning, spawning, life cycle, etc.) and can be done in any medium that can be reproduced for print, screen printing or perhaps embroidery. Submissions must be original artwork not previously used in any commercial reproduction. The selected artist will be compensated for artwork based on final usage, i.e., public recognition, monetary, final item samples. Artwork may be submitted by mail, on disk, electronically or in person. Electronic submissions should be minimum 300 dpi. Lower-resolution pdfs for review are allowed, but must be available in higher resolution if selected. All artwork must be received at the Festivals Office, 155 N.W. Gilman Blvd., or sent to no later than 5 p.m. June 25. All original artwork will be returned to artists. Nancy S. Whitten The Issaquah Press Next arrival at Cougar Mountain Zoo could be cheetah Administrators chase big cat as they form plan for latest acquisition BY WARREN KAGARISE A cheetah could be the next addition to Cougar Mountain Zoo s big cat collection, a zoo administrator said last week. General Curator Robyn Barfoot said she hopes to open a cheetah exhibit with a single animal within a year. If Barfoot and her team were successful, Cougar Mountain Zoo would be the only facility in the state to exhibit the world s fastest land animal. First, zoo administrators must raise nearly $2 million to ready the exhibit and obtain the cheetah or cheetahs from a breeding facility in South Africa. Cheetahs have long been part of the zoo s collection plan, Barfoot said. Plans call for the cheetah habitat to eventually house two or three male animals. A zoo map near the main entrance shows the location of planned exhibits including a cheetah habitat in the southeastern corner of the zoo. Barfoot said the cheetah would be a captive-born animal. She plans to travel to South Africa to pick up the cheetah and help transport the animal to the zoo. Send me now, she said. I want to bring them to the zoo. A collection plan outlines the animals the zoo would like to acquire based on the conservation value and appeal to visitors. The existing collection encompasses 28 species and includes a cougar and a pair of Bengal tigers. More than 50 percent of the species represented at the City to replace water main For about three to four weeks beginning June 15 through midsummer the city of Issaquah will be replacing a water main pipe and service connections as a part of its water main replacement project. New lines will be installed to replace existing, aging pipes. The size of the construction equipment needed for the project will require both lanes of the following narrow street sections to be temporarily closed one location at a time during normal construction hours: First Avenue Northwest from West Sunset Way to Northwest Dogwood Street Northwest Alder Place from First Avenue Northwest to Front Street First Place Northwest from 19 First Place Northwest to 175 First Place Northwest Access to residences and businesses will be provided during construction. Construction hours will vary between 7 a.m. and 6 p.m. Monday through Friday. Residences and businesses affected by anticipated water shut-offs will be notified 48 hours in advance. Anyone with questions or concerns can call City, fire district weigh Station 72 agreement City officials will consider an agreement with Fire Protection District 10 to help cover the cost of the planned Eastside Fire & zoo are endangered. A lot of research goes into every animal acquisition, Barfoot said. Zoo administrators plan to embark on a fundraising effort in order to build the habitat and acquire a cheetah. Barfoot said she and her team were planning several activities to garner donations for the project. People hear $2 million and it scares them, but even if they donate $1, that s $1 less that we need to raise, she said. Administrators are also planning a fundraiser for late summer in order to raise money for a larger habitat for Taj and Almos, 2-year-old Bengal tiger cubs and a main attraction at the zoo. A cheetah exhibit would set Cougar Mountain Zoo apart from other, larger zoos in Washington. The facility would become the only wildlife park in Washington to exhibit the graceful animals known for their spotted coats and running speeds faster than 60 mph. The closest facility with a cheetah exhibit is in Winston, Ore. Wildlife Safari, a drive-through preserve about 90 minutes south of Eugene, has operated a cheetah-breeding program since Barfoot said there are no plans to establish a similar program at Cougar Mountain Zoo. Greater Issaquah Chamber of Commerce CEO Matt Bott praised the zoo for adding to its roster of family-friendly attractions. Bott and other business leaders launched a tourism push to draw Seattle visitors to the Eastside. Anything that the members of our community can do to distinguish our community as a great place to spend a weekend or an afternoon is a good thing, he said. Reach Reporter Warren Kagarise at , ext. 234, or Comment on this story at Rescue Station 72. The station will be constructed on Maple Street Northwest at state Route 900, and will replace the existing Station 72. That station was intended as a temporary structure and has outlasted its original lifespan. City Council members referred the agreement to the Council Services & Operations Committee for review. The committee is set to meet June 18. Since early 2007, city and District 10 officials have discussed the possibility of District 10 helping to pay for Station 72 construction. About 17 percent of the coverage area for Station 72 covers District 10. The district includes Klahanie, Preston, Carnation, Tiger Mountain and May Valley. If the district were to shoulder 17 percent of the construction cost, its total would be about $1.5 million. But District 10 committed $2 million toward the construction of Station 72. The proposed agreement irons out the financing. It would require District 10 to give the city $1 million toward the construction of Station 72. The agreement also provides for an additional $1 million contribution toward the fire station construction. District 10 would continue to receive coverage from three fire stations owned by the city. The $2 million would be paid to the city in four installments. Voters overwhelmingly approved a $4.5 million bond measure last fall to build the new station. Wills & Estate Planning Assists clients with wills, trusts and estate transfer planning Counsels family members regarding estate settlement and probate Structures complex estate planning strategies involving trusts, tax planning and charitable giving Nancy S. Whitten Call ext. 103 or at Carson & Noel PLLC SE 64th Place, Suite 140, Issaquah Local dancer has the right moves BY CHANTELLE LUSEBRINK Issaquah s Paris Torres has placed in the top 20 on the television show So You Think You Can Dance. I wasn t expecting anything and I went in with an open mind. If I didn t make it, it s not the end of the world, I d pick it up and keep going, Torres said in a June 9 telephone interview from Los Angeles. But to make this year s top 20, man, is serious business. Daily, I wake up thinking, Wow, how d I make it this far? These dancers are amazing. The 19-year-old, whose specialty is contemporary dance, is a graduate of Skyline High School. She began dancing when she was 6. My parents got me dance lessons for a Christmas present, she said. I looked at the present, which was a piece of paper that said a month worth of dance lessons and thought it was awesome, but where were my other presents? As I got older, it didn t hit me until I was about 13, those dramafilled teen years, that this is the best escape for me, she added. I could go into the dance studio and everything would leave you. Since that time, Torres has been a Miss Washington Teen pageant winner and was a Seattle Storm and Seattle SuperSonics junior dancer from She now lives with her parents and teaches lessons at a dance studio. She tried out for the show last year, but was cut before the Top 20. However, she didn t lose sight of her dream to be a professional dancer. So, she flew to Miami for a second audition with So You Think You Can Dance. If she wins, Torres said she would go on tour with the show s top 10 dancers. After, she said she would finally be able to move to L.A., where she can focus on tryouts for commercials, conventions, musical theater, dance studios and anything else that needs someone with her talents. There are so many opportunities. I want to dibble and dabble in everything, she said. The competition truly begins Wednesday as the top 20 finalists dance for the judges praise and America s votes on the season s first performance show. The 20 are paired into 10 couples who will work with a world-renowned choreographer to compose a dance routine representing their assigned genre. Since arriving on the set of the show, Torres said she hasn t had a lot of time. We wake up at the crack of dawn and go home at midnight. We never stop. And once I m home, I just keep practicing and Power restored after wind causes outage for 1,200 customers Strong winds knocked out power for 1,200 customers in Issaquah and Preston June 4. Issaquah residents and city crews cleaned up fallen tree limbs the next day. Puget Sound Energy spokeswoman MacKenzie McDowell said 1,200 local customers were affected by the outage. She said falling tree limbs pulled down power lines and caused the outage. Most of the customers had their power restored within two to three hours, McDowell said. PSE crews also received a report of a downed power line on 290th Avenue east of 61st Street, McDowell said. Autumn Monahan, city public information officer, said crews from the city Public Works Salon Couture Welcomes Gina Shields, Color Specialist FREE cut w/color service exp. 9/1/ PHOTO BY MIKE RUIZ/FOX Paris Torres, a 19-year-old Skyline High School graduate, has been selected for the top 20 of the television reality series, So You Think You Can Dance. WHAT TO KNOW So You Think You Can Dance 8 p.m. Wednesdays 9 p.m. Thursdays KCPQ 13 practicing, she said. There s never an opportunity to relax, or say I got this, I got this. I have to stay on my toes and I always know there is room to improve. After each Wednesday performance show, the phone lines will open and the fate of these 20 finalists one of whom will be named America s Favorite Dancer will be left up to the voting fans. On the live results shows beginning Thursday, the three couples with the lowest number of votes will be announced. Each week, the six contestants in the bottom three couples will be given a chance to perform solo routines in the hopes of convincing the judges to keep them in the competition. The judges then decide which dancers stay and which two are eliminated. If a couple is split, the two individual dancers who remain become a couple the following week. Thursdays will also feature live performances by today s hottest music stars and dance acts. On June 11, Sean Kingston will perform his new hit single, Fire Burning on the Dance Floor, from his upcoming sophomore album, Tomorrow. It is hard, hard to keep yourself in check and focused, because there is so much going on, Torres said. But I breathe through each moment, really live in each moment, and I m not anxious for what s to come. Reach Reporter Chantelle Lusebrink at , ext. 241, or Comment on this story at Operations Department spent June 5 cleaning up debris. She said residents of a neighborhood where a tree went down were working with officials to ensure they abided by city tree codes. The strong gusts followed days of record-high temperatures. School district hosts two ground-breaking ceremonies The community is invited to two school ground-breaking events this month. The Issaquah High School ceremonial ground-breaking event is at 4:30 p.m. June 11 at the northwest corner of the track/stadium. The ground-breaking ceremony for the new elementary school on the plateau, temporarily named Elementary 15 is at 10 a.m. June Front St. N, Suite E Historical Downtown Issaquah Local news, updated daily!

3 Wednesday, June 10, 2009 A3 CONTRIBUTED Goats from Rent-a-Ruminant and Healing Hooves will eat invasive plants in the Issaquah Highlands this summer. Goats have done landscape work for several municipal projects, as shown above. Goats will landscape highlands hillsides BY WARREN KAGARISE Parts of the Issaquah Highlands will resemble a PEMCO Insurance ad in late June and early July, when hundreds of goats start to munch invasive plants on steep hillsides. Some of the goats clearing brush in the highlands were featured in the Goat Renter Guy spot that poked fun at Pacific Northwesterners for relying on ruminants to tame wayward plants. Issaquah Highlands Community Association managers hired a pair of goat herders and about 400 goats to tackle landscaping on stretches of hillside too difficult and expensive for human crews to maintain. I m told they ll eat anything that s green, said Russ Ayers, landscape manager for the highlands community association. Goats will work in the highlands for about two and a half weeks. Ayers said arrival dates for the goats had yet to be finalized. Managers budgeted $27,000 to rent goats from herders from Vashon Island and Edwall. Ayers said the four-legged landscapers are cheaper and willing to work longer hours than their bipedal counterparts. Plus, the sure-footed animals will have little problem scaling steep terrain. Managers expect goats to nosh on high grass, as well as invasive Himalayan blackberry and Scotch broom. Ayers said goats would also eat alder seedlings. Crews will protect landscaped planting areas with fencing. Herder Craig Madsen plans to bring about 240 goats to the highlands from his Healing Hooves ranch in Edwall, about an hour southwest of Spokane. He said goats prefer shrubs and plants with broad leaves; they also have a taste for blackberry. Madsen said his herd would begin nibbling across the highlands in early July. Another herd will come from Rent-a-Ruminant, a Vashon Island brush-clearing business. Rent-a- Ruminant owner Tammy Dunakin said goats are able to clear brush in areas that cannot be accessed safely by people or machinery. Goats eat vegetation as they clear it and they fertilize soil with their droppings. Moreover, the rumen part of the goat digestive tract sterilizes most seeds and prevents plants from spreading, she added. They re a very green alternative to using machinery, Dunakin said, adding she plans to bring about 120 goats to the highlands. Highlands residents who hope to watch the goats work will be able to do so from several vantage points. Bystanders will be able to watch herds near South Pond, adjacent to Central Park. Goats will eat across the hillside between the pond and houses on 24th Avenue. Ayers also recommended overlooks and trails on a stretch between 30th and 28th avenues where goats will work. But bystanders should stand back: Goats will be secured behind temporary electric fences. Madsen and Ayers said goats are usually wary of strangers. This is not a petting zoo, Ayers said. He said residents applauded the goat proposal since managers announced it in the monthly highlands community newspaper. People think it s a very clever idea, he said. Of course, no goats have gotten loose yet. Madsen said he plans to transport the goats across the Cascades in a double-decker trailer. After days of tending to the herd, he ll bed down in a sleeper compartment in the cab of his tractor-trailer. Madsen is familiar with the routine. Healing Hooves goats have also tackled municipal landscape projects in Auburn and Tukwila. Association managers said goats could return to the highlands for future landscape projects. We re optimistic about this project and will be considering additional treatment areas for the future, Ayers wrote in a follow-up . There are over 1,400 acres of open space here, and so far, invasive species do not have much of a foothold. Ayers said association managers considered using goats to landscape portions of the highlands for a couple of years. He said the pace of construction kept managers from calling in goats earlier. We re very excited about this, association general manager John Beaman said. Our motto up here in the Issaquah Highlands is living green. A lot of people live here because of our green philosophy. Reach Reporter Warren Kagarise at , ext. 234, or Comment on this story at BY ADAM ESCHBACH Firefighters put out a brush fire June 2 in the woods behind the Issaquah School District Transportation Center, 805 Second Ave. S.E. Fire FROM PAGE A1 burning along the fenced area. He said he thought the cottonwood seed fluff could have caught on fire, then the leaves, with flames making their way into the woods next to the Rainier Boulevard Trail. The brush fire started near a portion the new 2008 Thomas buses, with regeneration exhaust systems. At first, fire and district officials thought the new exhaust systems, which eject and burn diesel inside the muffler at very hot temperatures to burn off soot, could have sparked the flames. However, the cause of the fire remains undetermined, according to Sara Niegowski, the district communications director. Fire investigators tried to recreate a situation where a bus exhaust system caused the fire, but couldn t, she said. Rittenhouse FROM PAGE A1 contenders. The last day to file for election as a write-in candidate is Aug. 17. The primary election will be held Aug. 18 and the general election is Nov. 3. In the meantime, Rittenhouse plans to help open a human services campus in Issaquah. Officials envision the campus as a central point from which to aid people in need of food, healthcare and employment. I am looking forward to continuing to work on bringing a human services campus to Issaquah, as well as spending time to refine a long-term vision for our community, Rittenhouse wrote. Rittenhouse, a Microsoft program manager, served as an alternate member of the city Planning Policy Commission before running for the Position 1 council seat. He ran for election four years ago as an opponent of the proposed Southeast Bypass. He later voted with other bypass opponents last year to kill plans for the Tiger Mountain roadway. As a councilman, Rittenhouse led the effort to cap campaign contributions for municipal candidates. His colleagues voted last month to place a $500 limit on cash and in-kind donations from a single party. Ironically, he missed the meeting due to illness. Rittenhouse said he also plans to help city officials implement eco-friendly policies. We have correctly put an emphasis on sustainability, but for Issaquah to truly be sustainable and resilient over the next generation, our goals need to holistically change, he continued. Making that happen will take some time and I want to begin developing that framework. Reach Reporter Warren Kagarise at , ext. 234, or Comment on this story at Candidates FROM PAGE A1 are Marts, a Squak Mountain resident, and Nathan Perea, a member of the city Urban Village Development Commission. McCarry was appointed to the council in 1998 to fill the seat vacated by Frisinger, a former councilwoman. McCarry served until 2000, but opted not to run then. McCarry ran successfully in She will face South Cove resident Joan Probala a former chamber of commerce president in the contest for the Position 5 seat, according to county filings. Councilman John Rittenhouse, whose Position 1 seat is also open this year, decided not to run for reelection. Mullet is seeking the Position 1 seat. He serves on the board of directors for the Issaquah Highlands Community Association. The race for mayor attracted incumbent Frisinger, who had earlier announced her intentions to seek another term. Frisinger was first elected mayor in 1997 after serving as a city councilwoman. All city voters will cast ballots for municipal positions. Candidates are not required to live within a particular district to run for a specific council seat. Three candidates are running for two open Issaquah School Board positions. Marnie Maraldo, president of the Newcastle Elementary School PTSA, and Wright A. Noel, an attorney at Issaquah law firm Carson & Noel, are running for the Director District 2 position, which serves the south end of the district or schools in the Liberty High School attendance area. Connie Fletcher, who holds the District 2 position and has served on the board since 1993, opted not to run for re-election. Director District 4 incumbent Chad Magendanz will run unopposed. Magendanz was appointed to the position in October. He serves the areas in the southeast corner of the district, including the highlands, Preston, Mirrormont and Tiger Mountain. Although all voters within the Issaquah School District vote for the positions, school board candidates must live within the boundaries of their director districts to be eligible for the post. Some Issaquah voters will also cast ballots for other government boards. Nonpartisan seats on the Fire Protection District 10 and the Sammamish Plateau Water & Sewer District boards are also open. Incumbent Commissioner Mike Mitchell filed for re-election to his District 10 post. He will run unopposed. The district includes Klahanie, Preston, Carnation, Tiger Mountain and May Valley. Incumbent Commissioner Mary Shustov will run unopposed for her Sammamish Plateau Water & Sewer District position. The other open seat attracted two candidates who have been vying since February for a seat on the board. Longtime Commissioner Steve Stevlingson held the open seat until he missed several meetings due to illness and was removed from the board by his fellow commissioners. Robert Abbott and Stan Stone both applied for the vacant position in February. They were finalists during the interview process. But commissioners were unable to select a new board member in a timely manner. The decision then fell to King County Councilwoman Kathy Lambert, who has not chosen who will hold the post until the election. Countywide, more than 500 candidates filed for 331 county, city and local taxing district positions on the ballot. Reporter J.B. Wogan contributed to this story. Comment on it at Corrections In a May 20 article titled Sunny Hills Art Fair a scene to remember, Monica Rockwell should have been identified as the Art Fair chair for the event. In the Free Time! Recreation Guide published June 3, the time of the Concerts on the Green was incorrect. 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4 A4 Wednesday, June 10, 2009 PRESSEDITORIAL ISD graduates share amazing success stories OPINION Issaquah School District graduates continue to make the news. Brian Yorkey, Issaquah High graduate, receives a Tony Award for Best Original Score for which he authored the lyrics. Paris Torres, Skyline High Class of 1999, places in the top 20 on the television show, So You Think You Can Dance. And that s just this week s headlines! We hope these two standouts will be an inspiration to our district graduates at all four high schools as they receive their diplomas this week. It s about the possibilities, reaching for the stars, putting in the hard work and passion, and then sitting back and letting the accolades come. Just ask Yorkey, who dared to dream of winning a Tony when he was only 12. Issaquah graduates continue to amaze us, whether they are entering a university or a trade school, joining the military or heading straight to a job and assuming more responsibility. Yes, there will be mistakes made along the way, but for most people, the next few years of maturing and developing a sense of community over self will produce the kind of citizens the Issaquah School District has helped to shape. Graduates past and present, we salute you on your successes and your new beginnings. Zoo invites visitors, wary reporter to feed grizzlies Woodland Park Zoo visitors ogle resident grizzlies Keema and Denali from behind thick glass and across an enclosure landscaped to hide the barrier between man and beast. Outfitted with a bubbling stream and evergreens, the bear exhibit resembles a stretch of Pacific Northwest wilderness once part of the grizzly s range. Zookeepers know the grizzly habitat can resemble a campsite after a few tweaks. On June 6, keepers transformed the grizzly habitat into a campsite, albeit one pitched by ignorant campers and stocked with provisions that can bring grizzlies and humans into contact with one another. As part of the annual Bear Affair, keepers shooed the grizzlies from the habitat while they added a haphazard campsite to the enclosure. Food was stored near the tent, trash was left unsecured both no-nos for campers hoping to avoid an unfortunate grizzly encounter. When keepers released grizzlies into the redone enclosure, Keema and Denali made short work of the nylon tent, rubber raft and plastic coolers left behind by nonexistent campers. I imagined the bears would tear through the mock campsite, using their claws each 3 to 4 inches long to wreak havoc. Instead, Keema and Denali moved methodically through the campsite, relying on their powerful noses to direct them to the choicest items left behind by their keepers. I watched as one of the bears lumbered away from his brother to eat a box of cereal. Even bears hoard Cap n Crunch. Meanwhile, the other bear shredded a raft into confetti-sized pieces and then used his powerful paws to pry open a beverage cooler filled with juice. Less than 40 minutes after the bears set upon the campsite, only debris remained. Zookeepers hosted a second campsite demonstration later. During the second round, however, keepers used bear-safe provisions and techniques safer for bears and humans alike. Humans continue to encroach on bear habitat. Bear Affair was OFFTHE PRESS set up to alert people about how interactions between bear and man can be detrimental to both species. Whereas grizzlies once roamed forests across the western United States and the Warren Kagarise Press Reporter Pacific Northwest, their modernday range is limited to western Canada and Alaska. About 25,000 black bears remain in Washington and only 30 or so grizzlies still roam the North Cascades and Selkirk Mountains, according to figures provided by the zoo. Sensationalism ensues whenever bears are sighted in neighborhoods. A bear evaded wildlife officers in Seattle for several days last month and became a media darling in the process. Bear sightings in Issaquah are nothing new either. On June 4, I hurried to a report of a black bear in the Issaquah Highlands near the Central Park trailhead. By the time I arrived, however, the only black I saw was the color of the uniforms on the Issaquah Police officers who had also responded to the tip. A couple of days later, I had a close-up bear encounter at Woodland Park Zoo. Before the campsite demonstrations, I joined conservationists and zookeepers for a behind-the-bars look at the grizzly exhibit. Coaxed with a grape reward, the bears obliged us by standing on their hind legs to show off their impressive bulk. Keepers were ready to shepherd us toward our next stop when another member of my group piped up. Will we be allowed to feed the bears? she asked. When it was my turn to slip a grape through the metal bars, I hesitated. Then, realizing I would never be so close to a docile bear again, popped a grape into the mouth of a full-grown grizzly. Yes, I still have all of my fingers. Memorial Day Issaquah VFW thanks Issaquah community for joining service Our Veterans of Foreign Wars Post No expresses its heartfelt thanks to the citizens of Issaquah who took the time May 25 to join us for our annual Memorial Day Service. It meant a lot to us for you to share our honor for all those men and women who have served this nation and our community, especially those who gave, as President Lincoln said, that last full measure of devotion. Your attendance is a firm testimony that you care about those who serve and those who have paid the ultimate sacrifice that we may remain free people in a free country. Thank you! Special thanks go to City Councilman Fred Butler for one of the best ever Memorial Day addresses we have ever heard. And thanks for your service to our nation. Also, a special thanks to the young men and women from the Issaquah High School Junior Naval Reserve Officers Training Corps for taking this day off from school to provide us with the best Color Guard and Honor Guard services a community can request. You re terrific young men and women and we, the VFW, appreciate all that you do for us and the community. Thanks also go to our Boy Scout Troop No. 709 and Cub Scout Pack No. 639, for all of your help setting up the cemetery and taking down all of the flags and crosses. It is heartwarming to know that you, too, care about what veterans have done to secure your freedom and provide a free country in which you can grow and learn. Thanks again, everyone, for making this a memorable Memorial Day. David Waggoner, senior vice commander Veterans of Foreign Wars Post No Cedar Hills landfill County residents should be proud of its environmentally friendly operations We are pleased points out that changes made in the past 30 years to improve Cedar Hills Regional Landfill operations are to the point today that residents are barely aware of King County s landfill ( Expansion of landfill not acceptable May 6). We believe that s a testament to the quality of our operation and how we have worked hard to be a good neighbor and earn the trust of county residents. It s true that King County officials are evaluating options to extend the life of the county s award-winning landfill and preserve this costeffective disposal option to keep rates low for residents. It s a strategy that has the support of the County Council and two advisory committees that represent staff members and elected officials from cities, residents, waste management companies, the recycling industry, public interest groups, labor, recyclable markets and TO THE EDITOR manufacturers in King County. Please note that the landfill is already turning garbage into a green energy resource. A new landfill gas-to-energy facility is now online, turning methane generated through the decomposition of garbage into pipeline-quality natural gas for the energy market. The facility is expected to earn the county more than $1 million annually from the sale of green energy, generate enough gas to meet the energy needs of 24,000 homes, cut greenhouse gas emissions and create green jobs. King County officials will continue to work with their stakeholders in updating the comprehensive plan to explore options such as long-haul export to out-of-county landfills, waste-to-energy (incineration) and other technologies to ensure safe and environmentally sound disposal once Cedar Hills reaches its permitted capacity. The city of Seattle and neighboring counties have transported their waste to out-of-county landfills for years. In the meantime, operation of the Cedar Hills Regional Landfill is a safe, environmentally sound method of disposal that is less costly to ratepayers than solid waste disposal via waste export or waste-to-energy technologies. Kevin Kiernan, director King County Solid Waste Division Cell tower Opponents didn t provide evidence of safety, property value problems The June 3 Press addressed an issue which seems strange to me. The school district is strapped for funds and this cell tower was a source of $1,300 each month to the school district. Some people are against such a move and indicated it was not safe and would reduce property values. What evidence did they offer, if any? Has anyone heard of any incidents of a cell tower hurting anyone? What is more likely to reduce property values, a cell tower on school property or a recession? In addition, will all of those folks who are against a cell tower making money for the school district, please throw all of their cell phones in the cell phone recycle bin? Ken Sessler Issaquah Cemetery markers It is scary times when the thought police act outraged over simple dissent My goodness! Have we really devolved to the point where dissent has become hate in our fair city? I m stunned at the feigned outrage the albeit poor choice of wording letter attributed to Mike Huber has stirred. Frankly, the original issue could be handled quietly and without high offense by either placing, removing or exchanging an unwanted or incorrect symbol placed with the intent of honoring a fallen military veteran. But it seems when you speak of religion, military matters, morality or political conservatism, you risk the fiery condemnation and labeling so commonly used these days. As I see it, Huber was simply defending the time-honored use of religious symbols on the graves of military veterans. I may not have used some of his illustrations, but none of his words or sentiment appeared to have approached hatred nor was The Press guilty in printing the letter. Harkening back to the late 1930s and mid1940s Germany when hate really meant something evil, not merely disagreement citizens and news organizations were vilified and eliminated if they raised the voice of dissent. These again are becoming scary times. How hypocritical are some of our citizens who deemed themselves morally and politically correct when expressing intense hatred toward our former president and then became selfanointed thought police who in turn label dissenters as hate mongers? Oh, how their robes of intellectual sanctimony and political piousness are stained when they do so. Mark L. Bowers Issaquah Responses to letter were offensive The responses by Michael Barr, Dahlia Levin and Laureen Light to my justly opposing Irv Levin s wanting to strip Christian crosses from our veterans graves at national cemeteries were obnoxious, virulent and inexcusable. Their amusing use of the hackneyed propaganda guilt whips hateful, offensive, shame, Holocaust, anti-semitic, bigotry and insensitive tells me they are in a house of cards that is ready to fall. Make sure their house doesn t fall on you. Mike Huber Issaquah LETTERS WELCOME welcomes letters to the editor on any subject, although we reserve the right to edit for space, potential libel and/or political relevance. Letters addressing local news will receive priority. Please limit letters to 350 words and type them, if possible. is preferred. Letters must be signed and have a daytime phone number to verify authorship. Deadline for letters is noon Friday for the following week s paper. Address: P.O. Box 1328 Issaquah, WA Fax: THE ISSAQUAHPRESS PUBLISHED EVERY WEDNESDAY SINCE FRONT ST. S. P.O. BOX 1328 ISSAQUAH, KING COUNTY, WA $30 PER YEAR / $55 TWO YEARS / $18 PER YEAR FOR SENIORS ADD $15 OUTSIDE KING COUNTY / $20 OUTSIDE STATE ALL DEPARTMENTS CAN BE REACHED AT fax: web site: DEBORAH BERTO PUBLISHER JILL GREEN ADVERTISING MGR. VICKIE SINGSAAS ADVERTISING ANN LANDRY ADVERTISING JODY TURNER ADVERTISING MARIANA SKAKIE CLASSIFIEDS KATHLEEN R. MERRILL EDITOR CHANTELLE LUSEBRINK... REPORTER DAVID HAYES REPORTER JIM FEEHAN REPORTER WARREN KAGARISE REPORTER GREG FARRAR PHOTOGRAPHER DONA MOKIN ART DESIGN DIR. BREANN GETTY. PROD. COORDINATOR SCOTT SPUNG ACCOUNTING KELLY BEZDZIETNY CIRC MGR. OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER FOR THE CITY OF ISSAQUAH Postmaster: Send address changes to: Issaquah Press, PO Box 1328 Issaquah, WA 98027

5 Officials want input ahead of May Creek Bridge closure BY WARREN KAGARISE King County transportation planners want to hear from drivers whose commutes will be impacted when crews replace the aging May Creek Bridge. Planners will host a June 11 open house at Briarwood Elementary School from 5:30-7:30 p.m. County Road Services Division officials will be available to answer questions and accept comments about the planned closure. Officials hope to close the bridge next summer. Depending on which construction option they choose, the bridge could be closed from two to six months. Officials will also be available at the open house to talk privately with property owners about concerns related to the bridge project. May Valley Bridge was built in Timber supports beneath the roadway have decayed and the bridge has outlived its intended lifespan, officials said. Moreover, the roadway is narrow and constricts traffic that uses the nearby intersection of state Route 900 and Southeast May Valley Road. Barbara de Michele, community relations planner for the project, said the bridge is quite past its useful lifespan. There s quite a bit of deterioration that needs to be replaced desperately, she added. The replacement bridge would meet modern safety standards. Plans call for the replacement bridge to be 40 feet wide with a 30- foot span. The bridge would include two 12-foot-wide travel lanes. The roadway would be wider and have improved sight lines and wider road shoulders for cyclists and pedestrians. Jessy Jose, project manager for the May Valley Bridge overhaul, Bike ride, car show close roads June 21 Drivers are advised to plan ahead June 21, as there are two separate events scheduled in Issaquah that will affect traffic flow. From 6 a.m. - 5 p.m. June 21, Front Street North will be closed from East Sunset Way to Northwest Gilman Boulevard for the Mountains to Sound Greenway Days Fenders on Front Street Car Show and Cruise. The afternoon of June 21, a bicycle ride for the Livestrong IF YOU GO May Creek Bridge open house June 11 5:30-7:30 p.m. Briarwood Elementary School multipurpose room S.E. 134th St., Renton Sign up for s about the project by ing Community Relations Planner Barbara de Michele at Challenge will travel through Issaquah, including the following roads: Issaquah-Hobart Road Southeast, Second Avenue Southeast, East Sunset Way, Highlands Drive Northeast, Southeast Black Nugget Road and East Lake Sammamish Parkway. After traveling north, the cyclists will briefly return to the city on Southeast Newport Way and Northwest Village Park Drive. Another route will also include Newport Way Northwest. These roads will not be closed during the ride, and cyclists will said county officials are considering a full or partial closure for the duration of construction. A full closure would allow workers to complete the bridge replacement in about two to three months. A partial closure a more expensive option would allow vehicles to continue using the bridge during the five to six months of construction. County officials opted for a partial closure of Bandaret Bridge across Issaquah Creek. The roadway is restricted to one lane over the creek through November while crews build a replacement bridge a few feet away. Road Services Division officials want drivers to weigh in about May Creek Bridge construction options at the open house, and de Michele said the comments would be a factor in the construction decision. She said 5,800 postcards were sent to nearby residents alerting them to the project and the open house. County staffers will also coordinate with officials at the Issaquah School District, state Department of Transportation and emergency service providers to reduce the impact of construction. Reach Reporter Warren Kagarise at , ext. 234, or Comment on this story at be required to adhere to the rules of the road. Drivers, however, should expect possible delays. Schools calendar changes To help balance the state budget, legislators eliminated funding for a professional development Learning Improvement Day for teachers March 19, As a result, the Issaquah School District calendar has changed. March 19 will be a regular school day, instead of a day children have off. The last day of school in 2010 is June 17. Rollover FROM PAGE A1 shoulder of Issaquah-Hobart Road, in the days following the accident. Rutted vehicle tracks were visible in the grass nearby. The accident occurred within sight of Foothills Baptist Church, where Leslie was baptized twice. He was that guy that everyone liked, his girlfriend, Shanna Massey, said June 8. He was very charismatic and good hearted. Leslie worked at a moving and storage company with his dad, his sister Diane Orriolo said. He s worked there since he was about 4, since he was big enough to carry anything, she said. Leslie lived in Issaquah for most of his life. He attended Maple Hills Elementary, Maywood Middle and Liberty High schools. His last academic year at Liberty was , but he graduated in California in He loved fishing, camping and being an uncle to my kids, Ava, 2, and Jefry, 2 months, Orriolo said. Police said alcohol and speed appeared to be factors in the accident. The posted speed limit along that stretch of Issaquah-Hobart Road is 35 mph. Obtaining toxicology results including bloodalcohol content will take several weeks. There was evidence of alcohol consumption in the car, Issaquah Police Cmdr. Stan Conrad said. He said Leslie was not wearing his seat belt. Massey and Orriolo said they thought others prematurely formed a conclusion about the cause of the crash. It s nobody s business, and it s alleged right now, Orriolo said. We won t have toxicology results back for eight to 10 weeks. Massey recalled her boyfriend as a careful driver. Something drastic had to have happened for him to run off the road, she said. I ve driven with him a lot. He used to coach me PUBLIC MEETINGS June 11 Council Utilities Committee Agenda: storm water regulations draft code amendments 5-5:30 p.m. Pickering Room, City Hall Northwest BY GREG FARRAR Rutted tracks of fresh dirt (above) and several bouquets of flowers mark the site where Christopher M. Leslie, of Issaquah, was killed in a fatal rollover accident June 5, in front of Foothills Baptist Church, where he was baptized and attended. Below, Leslie holds his niece Ava the day she was born. about driving, driving on ice, what to do when you see a deer. The women also objected to how Leslie was portrayed in several Web posts. I think the media is always sensationalizing things, Massey said. It hasn t been fair to the family and friends to say he deserved it. It s inappropriate and offensive. I think people should keep those things to themselves. Issaquah Police are working with the Washington State Patrol to further investigate the crash. He died right in front of our church, Orriolo said. Everyone has a destiny. You can t fight th Ave. N.W. Wednesday, June 10, 2009 A5 SERVICE INFORMATION Memorial service for Christopher M. Leslie 11:30 a.m. June 11 Foothills Baptist Church Issaquah-Hobart Road S.E Planning Policy Commission Agenda: proposed sign code changes 6:30-8 p.m. Council Chambers, City Hall South 135 E. Sunset Way June 16 Council Sustainability Committee 5-6 p.m. Baxter Room, City Hall Northwest death. Leslie s family members said they want people to know who he was, not just how he died. We want them to know how much he truly loved life and people, Orriolo said. Reach Editor Kathleen R. Merrill at , ext. 227, or Reach Reporter Warren Kagarise at ext. 234 or Comment on this story at th Ave. N.W. River & Streams Board 7-9 p.m. Pickering Room, City Hall Northwest th Ave. N.W. June 17 Development Commission 7-9 p.m. Council Chambers, City Hall South 135 E. Sunset Way Parties Meetings Weddings Receptions Accommodates 200 Stage for band or DJ RENT PINELAKE COMMUNITYCLUB Your news comments welcome! MEDICAL/DENTAL DIRECTORY OF ISSAQUAH Dr. Ken Lichtenwalter, B.A., D.C. Dr. Benjamin Britton, D.C., C.C.S.P. Located in the Klahanie Village Shopping Ctr. (425) st Pl. S.E. Issaquah, WA (425) Sharon Pellegrini, Patient Care Coordinator Kevin Connolly, Ph.D. Kim Blake, Ph.D Marisol Hanley, Ph.D Mary Hendrickson, Ph.D. Elizabeth Irwin, Ph.D Beatrice Joe, LMFT Maria Elena Lara, Ph.D. Nancy Martin, MN, ARNP, CS George Recknagel, Ph.D. Heidi Summers, M.D. John Sutton-Gamache, Ph.D Launi Treece, Ph.D. Heidi Vander Pol, Psy.D. Sharon Young, Psy.D. Issaquah Vision Clinic 450 NW Gilman Blvd., Suite 104 Issaquah, (425) , (425) Kerry J. Moscovitz, O.D. Pine Lake Dental-Medical Center SE 29th Street Sammamish, (425) Issaquah Dermatology Issaquah Professional Center 85 NW Alder Pl., Suite A Issaquah, (425) NE Gilman Blvd. (425) Family Practice Internal Medicine Pediatrics Sudoku Solution Family Dentistry 450 NW Gilman Blvd., Suite 103 Issaquah, (425 ) Pine Lake Dental/Medical Center SE 29th Street, #B Sammamish, (425) Audiology/Hearing Aid Services Gastroenterology General Surgery Ophthalmology Cataract Surgery Laser Refractive Surgery Corneal Transplants Optometry Contacts & Glasses Otolaryngology (Ear, Nose, & Throat) Occupational Therapy Podiatry Urology Feature Exchange

6 A6 Wednesday, June 10, 2009 BY JIM FEEHAN Equipment is moved into the new Tutta Bella restaurant at 715 N.W. GIlman Blvd. Tutta Bella opens June 15 Tutta Bella Neapolitan Pizzeria will open its Issaquah restaurant June 15. The pizzeria will be the Seattle-based chain s first expansion to the Eastside. The restaurant, at 715 N.W. Gilman Blvd., will open for dinner June 15. Lunch service will begin June 22. Hours will be 11 a.m. 10 p.m. Sunday to Thursday and 11 a.m. 11 p.m. Friday and Saturday. The 6,000-square-foot restaurant will seat 210 with 40 seats on the outdoor terrace. Tutta Bella occupies a space last filled by Chili s Grill & Bar. Pizzas will be baked in two five-foot round marble-clad wood-burning ovens under the supervision of chef Anthony Ferrara. A local priest will bless the ovens June 13. The ovens will be named Maria and Carolina, after the owner s mother and Italian grandmother, respectively. Washington apple wood will fuel the ovens and generate an average cooking temperature of 850 degrees. The menu will also feature calzones, antipasti, salads, housemade desserts and gelato. Test drive new car to support Booster Club The Booster Club at Issaquah High has teamed up with Michael s Chevrolet of Issaquah to allow drivers over age 18 to test drive a new Chevrolet at the dealership, th Ave. N.W., from 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. June 13. For every driver, Michael s will donate $20 to the school s booster club. Drivers must have a valid license and proof of insurance. Zeeks Pizza opening June 16 Zeeks Pizza will open in the Issaquah Highlands June 16, the second Eastside location for the Seattle-based chain and the first Zeeks to feature a full bar. The Highlands restaurant will open at the intersection of 25th Avenue Northeast and Park Drive Northeast. Owner Mark Mullet said he plans to hire about employees. Zeeks will have seating for 100 patrons and include an outdoor patio. Mullet said he was inspired to open a Zeeks after visiting the Belltown restaurant with his family. He said the neighborhood feel and mix of customers reminded him of the years he worked in the London financial district, where local pubs serve as gathering places for families and friends. Zeeks is known for toppingsladen pizzas such as the Tree Hugger (sun-dried tomatoes, spinach, mushrooms, artichoke hearts, broccoli, Roma tomatoes, garlic and olives) and the Texas Leaguer (olive oil glaze, barbecue sauce, mozzarella, chicken, red onion and fresh cilantro). Chipotle dishes up Northwest produce The next time diners sink their teeth into the massive burritos at Chipotle Mexican Grill, chances are they ll be eating produce grown in the Northwest. The Issaquah restaurant, 775 N.W. Gilman Blvd., and eight other Seattle-area branches will receive green bell peppers and jalapenos from Fewel Farms in Prosser, oregano from Herbco in Duvall and red onions from River Point Farms in Oregon. BUSINESS Chipotle also plans to serve hot burritos to farmers during a farmer appreciation day at area farmers markets, including the Issaquah Farmers Market. After each farmer appreciation day, Chipotle will host a fundraiser at the local restaurant to give back to the farmers market. In 2008, the restaurant chain committed to buying at least 25 percent of at least one ingredient from small to midsize farms within 200 miles of each restaurant. Chipotle increased the percentage to 35 percent this year. Talus building is finished Talus Village Center, Building 4, an eight-unit single-family attached building, has received its final certificate of occupancy. The building is at 2211 Talus Drive, and was constructed at a cost of $1.5 million. WaMu banks become Chase The tenant improvement at the former Washington Mutual Bank, 6100 E. Lake Sammamish Parkway (inside Fred Meyer), has been completed, and the bank is now rebranded as Chase Bank. The WaMu bank at 1195 N.W. Gilman Blvd. has completed its signage change and is also now a Chase Bank. Kumon opens in highlands Kumon Math and Reading Center has opened its doors in the Issaquah Highlands at 1036 N.E. Park Drive, directly across from the new pond and walking area. Kumon, an after-school math and reading program for children ages 3 to 18, works with families from the Highlands and Klahanie communities, as well as greater Issaquah, Bellevue and Sammamish. Kumon of Issaquah, recently awarded Gold Elite status for student academic performance, opened its first Eastside location in Kumon was founded in Japan in BY WARREN KAGARISE Long s Floors owners submitted a proposal to city planners to build a new showroom as part of a new commercial plaza on Southeast 56th Street. Business owners proposed building a 2,976-square-foot showroom and a 1,230-squarefoot addition to a 2,400-squarefoot warehouse on the site during the first phase of construction. The first phase would also include a 1,440-square-foot temporary structure. A second phase calls for removal of the temporary structure and construction of a 3,850- square-foot building for restaurant and retail space, according to plans submitted to city officials. Owners proposed the construction for a parcel at S.E. 56th St.. The property is next to Brown Bear Car Wash and the adjacent Chevron, and across Southeast 56th Street from FedEx. The site is slightly less than an acre. City development commissioners reviewed the proposal last week during a two-hour community conference. The conference, set up for citizens to weigh in on proposed development, did not attract any members of the public. Applicant Jeff Long said a new location along busy Southeast 56th Family Law Services O Brien Barton Wieck & Joe,Attorneys at Law Seng Livingston and Lisa Barton Attorneys at Law Full-Service Law Firm Offering: Divorce Legal Separation Custody/Parenting Plans Property Settlement Paternity Guardianships Modifications O Brien Professional Building 175 NE Gilman Blvd, Issaquah \áátöât{v{tåuxü büv{xáàüt VÉÇvxÜà June 15 at 7:30 PM THE VILLAGE THEATRE FRANCIS J. GAUDETTE THEATRE FREE ADMISSION 303 Front Street N Issaquah, WA CONTRIBUTED An artist s drawing shows Long s Floors plans for a new commercial plaza (above) located at Southeast 56th St. Below, an aerial photo shows the proposed location of the new store. Owners of flooring business eye new site for development CITY OF ISSAQUAH Street would increase his business visibility. The existing Long s Home Fashion Center is on Northwest Poplar Way, sandwiched by Interstate 90 and car dealerships. We want to make it an economical building, but we want it to look sharp, Long said. Commissioners raised concerns about the proposed layout of the site, particularly the proximity of the site to the East Lake Sammamish Trail and whether the parcel would be easy for emergency vehicles to access. Commissioners also asked questions about what signs should be allowed on the property. Since the early 80s, I ve been off and on this board, Commissioner Terry Davis said. Signage is like taking a root canal. You can look around the city and find any number of ways the commission has flip-flopped over the years. City Senior Planner Jerry Lind said the future of the project would depend on when Long addresses issues raised by the Development Commission. Applicants update their plans and resubmit them to city planners. Merrill Design, an architecture firm based on Front Street, is handling the project. Architect Jim Merrill praised Long for the expansion. Jeff is a brave man, Merrill said. He s undertaking this in a down market. Buy any entrée and get one FREE! With the purchase of two beverages. On your next visit, save on any breakfast, lunch or dinner entrée and enjoy. Real Breakfast 24/7. Valid only at Issaquah location. Not valid with any other coupon or offers. Coupon has no cash value. No change returned. One coupon per visit. One coupon per check per visit. Taxes and gratuity not included. No substitutions. Alcoholic beverages not included. Valid at participating restaurants only. Selection and prices may vary. Only original coupon accepted. Photocopied and Internet printed or purchased coupons are not valid DFO, LLC. Printed in the U.S.A. Offer expires 6/30/09. Remember your best friend. Pet Obituaries $75 Photo and up to 175 words included. Your choice of newspapers: Sammamish Review SnoValley Star Newcastle News Ellie was the greatest! My beloved German shepherd Ellie died Aug. 20, She was 14. Ellie spent much of her life in poor, unkind conditions, but was rescued and deeply loved and spoiled throughout her golden years. Her life was a lesson to others that no matter our past, we can learn to love and trust again. Ellie was puppylike and playful with her mother, her cat, her friends, the children of her mother s friends and small dogs. She found much joy in squeaky tennis balls. Ellie was a mother and daughter, sister and girlfriend, loyal and devoted best friend, caring and patient listener, fierce protector, guardian of secrets and a true diva. She is survived by her owner whose heart will never be the same. She will never be forgotten by the people who knew and loved her, especially her groomer and her vet. A walk in her memory raised money for the Seattle Humane Society. She would have whole-heartedly approved. Further donations can be made to the Washington German Shepherd Rescue at

7 COMMUNITY B WEDNESDAY, JUNE 10, 2009 Section A breath of fresh air I did not know that people breathed like this. I always thought one had to work at it. Carla Trulson-Essenberg Double lung transplant recipient Issaquah woman trains for marathon with new set of lungs BY CHANTELLE LUSEBRINK Nearly four years ago, Carla Trulson- Essenberg, didn t dream of walking to the mailbox. She couldn t. Even with oxygen at 56, the slight incline from her doorstep up her driveway was an impossible obstacle. But today, she is breathing new life into someone else s lungs and training for Seattle s Rock n Roll half-marathon. I feel younger than I did when I was in high school, she said. I did not know that people breathed like this. I always thought one had to work at it. Trulson-Essenberg had a double lung transplant Oct. 31, Ninety-four percent of recipients three years after transplantation live their lives with no assistance. They aren t just surviving, but they are thriving, said Mike Mulligan, her surgeon at the University of Washington Medical Center. Carla is representative of that. Trulson-Essenberg has had breathing problems her entire life, but she said she refused to think of herself as anything but normal. I did everything my brothers and sisters did, she said. It was the only life I knew, didn t know what normal was. I thought I was normal. When she married her husband, Dave Trulson, he would help drain her lungs with special massages every morning. Despite her health, she had two healthy children, Kirsten, 29, and Eric, 26. But as she aged, instead of giving her life, her lungs were taking it. I would make dinner in the morning and slip it in the oven in the evening, because by 4, I d be out of energy, she said, adding that she would have to pick and choose events and couldn t attend many of her children s athletic events. It was a slow decline, she said, and she didn t realize it was happening or how far she d deteriorated until picking up her daughter at Pacific Lutheran University in I phoned her room number and apparently had the wrong number. I just thought, I m going to have to find her. How am I going to do that? she said. At that point, I knew something was wrong. When she went to her doctor a couple of years later, he diagnosed her with pseudomonas, a small bacteria in the environment that healthy lungs typically fight off. But hers couldn t. She was referred to Dr. Mark Tonelli, a pulmonary and critical care physician with the UW Medical Center in Her diagnosis, when she came in, was already clear. The question was, Is she ready for transplant? Tonelli said. With her, she wasn t ready and we were trying to treat her with additional therapies to keep her from needing a transplant. But she was pretty far advanced and we started talking about transplant the first time I met her. My first reaction was, Oh no, my kids. Would I see my daughter get married or my BY GREG FARRAR Carla Trulson-Essenberg works out four times a week at Klahanie Fitness on a treadmill and with weights. Below, Trulson-Essenberg is thumbs up at the University of Washington Medical Center after her double lung transplant surgery (left), then recovers on her couch at her Klahanie home. ON THE WEB Rock n Roll Seattle Marathon Organ donation son graduate college? Trulson-Essenberg said. But all of a sudden, I remembered all the blessings I had, a wonderful husband, like Dave, and two children who knew and love the Lord. I knew no matter what happened, whether I died, I would be in God s presence, here on earth or in heaven, and that sustained me, she added. There are roughly 50 double lung transplants each year at the UW Medical Center, which makes it one of the most active programs in the country, Tonelli said. While the procedure has evolved, it s still risky, because lungs are more prone to be rejected by the body, he said. In fact, the survival rate among lung transplant patients after five years is between 50 percent and 60 percent, he said. But when a transplant is the only option left, he said, people are usually within one to two years of dying, and Trulson-Essenberg was there. Committing to the transplant process and having faith in the transplant team, then fully applying themselves to what they are asked to do can optimize their outcome, Mulligan said. It s not a matter of changing out one set of organs for another set. It is a huge physiological assault to the body. Trulson-Essenberg said she doesn t know much about the person whose lungs she has, only that it was a teen or young adult from Oregon. From the beginning, I knew someone else See NEW LUNGS, Page B3 BY ADAM ESCHBACH Don Long serves himself lunch provided by friends and neighbors who come to the Issaquah Food and Clothing Bank every Thursday to supply free meals. In tough times, volunteers offer the needy a free meal BY CHANTELLE LUSEBRINK They say nothing comes free, but in Issaquah that s not the case for a good lunch. Every Thursday at noon, card tables are quickly set up and a smorgasbord of food is splayed. Sandwiches, soups, pastries, fruits and drinks are crammed onto tables as patrons of the Issaquah Food and Clothing Bank wait patiently to dig in. It s really cool that the community reaches out to people in need here, said a woman in line in her mid-30s. (The woman said she didn t want to be named, because she lives in the area and has a teen daughter.) I m really appreciative. The free lunch is thanks to a handful of local friends and volunteers. It s meant to share a meal, share food. It s something so easy to do, said Marilyn Ottinger, an organizer. And now, wow. We have all these new friends with us. It s nice that there s help when you re financially strapped, and this is nice, freshly prepared food, the woman in line, a former corporate trainer, said. She said she never thought she d need assistance from the community, but is glad Issaquah is such a caring place. In the past three years, I ve fallen on some hard times, she said. The idea for serving free lunch at the food bank came from a Wednesday morning bible study about the gospel of John, hosted a few blocks away. Several members, like Ottinger, are also volunteers at the food bank. I started volunteering at the food bank last year and I d see HOW TO HELP Marilyn Ottinger at or Wes Howard- Brook at the line up way before it opened, she said. I thought, How easy would it be to provide lunch? Then, I thought of the gospel of John and in it, it says, The poor are always with you. I realized with you didn t mean they d always be poor, but they are with us to help. The group started serving in October and has been carrying on the tradition every Thursday since. We re just neighbors helping people, said Wes Howard- Brook, another organizer of the group and the bible study. There are many people from the group who donate, but only a few of us serve on a rotating basis, said volunteer Phyllis Johnson. While dishing up delectable lunchtime treats, like clam chowder, chili, macaroni and cheese, ham and Swiss cheese sandwiches, yogurt, fresh fruit, cookies and pastries from Panera Bread Co. and recently ice cream sundaes, the group has become a hit with several people. I go to the dinners at the fire station across from here, said one man standing in line, referring to the Catholic services dinners at Issaquah Community Services. That s how I found out about this. See FREE MEAL, Page B3 Fenders on Front Street Car Show highlights Greenway Days Festival The open trunk of a classic 1950 Ford features original roadside emergency accessories on Front Street with other cars during the Fenders on Front Street Car Show and Cruise. BY GREG FARRAR BY JEFF RICHARDS AND DAVID HAYES For two days in June, more than Interstate 90 will connect Seattle and Eastside residents. The 1.4 million acres of natural land that make up the Mountains to Sound Greenway and stretch along I-90 will be part of the sixth annual Greenway Days. Hosted by the Mountains to Sound Greenway Trust, the festival will have more than 25 events June in 10 communities over 100 miles along I-90. Participants will get a chance to learn more about the culture and history of the area, as well as the outdoor recreation available. The various activities include hikes, relays, bike rides, a car show and guided tours of local historical hot spots. Events will take place in Is- See FESTIVAL, Page B3 Vista Park opens in Issaquah Highlands BY JIM FEEHAN Residents in the Vista Park subdivision of the Issaquah Highlands now have a park to call their own. The narrow, 1-acre park is shoehorned between houses in the 1800 block of 10th Avenue Northeast. The park features a grass volleyball court, a children s playground area and a panoramic view of the Olympic Mountains. It s great to have an area with some grass, said Michael Hanley, who lives a few blocks away. The playground area will come in handy when my 3-year-old niece comes to visit. Port Blakely Communities, developer of the Issaquah Highlands, built Vista Park at a cost of $200,000. Vista Park is a great addition to our other parks in the Issaquah Highlands, said Alan Boeker, president of Port Blakely Communities. The park also links to the community s trail system. The park is a few blocks from the highlands commercial business district that includes Caffé Ladro, Sip Wine Bar and Restaurant, and Sorella Salon. Other parks in the BY GREG FARRAR Vista Park, in the Issaquah Highlands, includes playground equipment, a grass strip with walking paths and benches affording a view toward Seattle. highlands include Bark Park, a 2- acre, off-leash dog park; Ashland Park, which has a small wading pool; and Central Park with its children s climbing wall. The park fits our theme of a walkable, pedestrian-friendly community that is part of the new urban planning philosophy of smaller lot sizes with more density, said See NEW PARK, Page B3 CONTRIBUTED

8 A free women's self-defense seminar is from 6-7:30 p.m. June 12 at Karate West, 3310 East Lake Sammamish Parkway S.E. No experience necessary. Call Join the city of Issaquah and Seattle Tilth for Pickering Garden Open House from 5-7 p.m., June 11 in the Eagle Room, City Hall, 130 E. Sunset Way. Call or Learn more about Seattle Tilth by going to or calling , ext. 2. The Issaquah Farmers Market, from 9 a.m. 2 p.m. June 13 at Pickering Barn, th Ave. N.W., features the Issaquah History Museums Hometown History display in the hay barn. There is a cooking demonstration, and performances by Briarwood and Newcastle elementary school choirs, at 11 a.m. Mountains to Sound Greenway hosts the following trail maintenance and environmental restoration events. Trail events are from 9 a.m. - 3 p.m. Invasive removal events are from 9 a.m. 3 p.m. or 9 a.m. noon. Register at June 13: Invasive removal at Pickering Reach in Issaquah The Issaquah History Museums celebrate the centennial of the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition with an exhibit of AYPE memorabilia at the Issaquah Train Depot. The exhibit opens June 12 and up is through summer. Depot hours are from 11 a.m. 3 p.m. Friday through Sunday and from 4-8 p.m. Thursday. Call Overlake Hospital Medical Center hosts Cancer Survivorship: Looking to Your Future from 8 a.m. - 3:15 p.m. June 13, at the PACCAR Education Center on Overlake s Bellevue campus, th Ave. N.E., Bellevue. Registration is limited. Call to register. The Summer Reading Kickoff program, for home-schooled students ages 5-12, is at 7 p.m. June 15 at the Sammamish Library, th Ave. N.E. Call Eastside Catholic School hosts information sessions from 7-8 p.m. June 16 and 30 at its Sammamish campus, th Ave. S.E. Learn more by going to or calling Fundraisers B2 Wednesday, June 10, 2009 COMMUNITY CALENDAR FILE Queen of the (bike) rodeo The Issaquah Optimist Club s fourth annual Bike Safety Fair is from 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. June 13 at Issaquah Valley Elementary School, 555 N.W. Holly St. Kindergarteners through fifth-graders can bring their bikes, learn safety tips from police officers, test their skills on the obstacle course, get free professional bike tune-ups and get fitted for a free helmet, while supplies last. The Optimist Club will also collect nonperishable food donations. Events Girlfriends Against Childhood Cancer hosts Alex s Lemonade Stand from 10 a.m. 4 p.m. June 13 at PCC market, th Ave. Alex s Lemonade Stand Foundation is a national organization started by a 4-yearold who was diagnosed with cancer and died at age 8. All donations go directly to the foundation. Learn more at Religious/spiritual Why is Church Still Relevant? is the title of a live audio chat at 11 a.m. June 16 in the Christian Science Reading Room, 195 Front St. N. Bring your questions and thoughts to share with a longtime practitioner and teacher of Christian Science. Classes The free lunch seminar, Wealth Transfer Planning, hosted by Jana Williams, AAMS financial advisor with Edward Jones, is from 11 a.m. 1 p.m. June 10 at Lombardi s Italian Restaurant, 695 N.W. Gilman Blvd. Call CPR & First Aid, by Eastside Fire & Rescue, is from 8:30 a.m. 5 p.m. June 13 at Fire Station 83, Sammamish. Fee is $65 or $22 for CPR only. Call ArtEAST offers the workshop Decorative Bird House from 1-4 p.m. June 13 at Up Front [art], 48 Front St. N. Fee is $40. Go to to sign up. Issaquah Library The library is at 10 W. Sunset Way. Call Celebrate The Big Read and the featured book, The Call of the Wild, by taking a digital photo of you or family member reading to your dog(s). Submit photos to as a.jpg photo before June 30. The library offers the free programs for adults Job Search Strategies for a Positive Difference at 10:30 a.m. June 13. Strategy Games Group meets at 3:30 p.m. June 12. Teen Music Show: Librarypolooza, is at 7 p.m. June 19, with local bands Something About Envy, Jeff Stillwell, Save Kate, Seahouse, Masters and Johnson, and others. High school ID cards will be checked at the door. Manga Group Art Walk is at 5 p.m. June 24, featuring artwork by the Manga Group, henna tattoos and manga-inspired treats. Meet Christopher R. Mattix, the author of Nobody, as he discusses his story of poverty, desperation and ultimate redemption, at 7 p.m. June 30. Schlilaty, Winter Amy Kathleen Schlilaty and Santtu Antti Winter were married June 28, 2008, at the University Presbyterian Church, in Seattle. Ryan Church officiated. Amy, the daughter of Robert and Susan Schlilaty, of Issaquah, is a 2004 graduate of Issaquah High School. Her bridal attendants were Allison Schlilaty, as maid of honor, and Sarah Rothman, Katie Drewel and Hanna Winter. Amy earned a degree in chemistry from Whitworth University in She is studying at the University of Washington dental school. Santtu, the son of Pertti and Eila Winter, of Helsinki, Finland, is a 2003 graduate of Bellevue High School. His groomsmen were Brendan Armstrong as best man, and Chris Kinzig, Erin Rodenbiker, John Schlilaty, Doull Allison Schlilaty and Josh Doull were married Sept. 13, 2008, at the University of Washington Botanical Gardens. Andrew Weiseth presided. Allison, the daughter of Robert and Susan Schlilaty, of Issaquah, is a 2002 graduate of Issaquah High School. Her bridal attendants were Amy Winter, Zoe Orcutt, Kristin Seymar and Caroline Kelle. Allison earned degrees in biochemistry, biophysics and molecular biology from Whitman College in Walla Walla in She is also a graduate student in nutritional sciences at the UW. Josh, the son of Randy and Terri Doull, of Issaquah, is a 2002 graduate of Issaquah High School. His groomsmen were Seth Doull, Sean Doull, Dan Arrington and Peter Cossette. The Issaquah Press Bramson, Campbell Lyndsay Bramson and Clay Campbell, both of Issaquah, were married March 7, 2009, at Covenant Presbyterian Church in Issaquah. The Rev. Brad T. Bromling officiated at the afternoon ceremony. The best man was Tom Weismantel. Groomsmen were Ryan Bramson, Pat Joiner, Mike Lang and Jordan Heinsohn. Jackie Keck was the maid of honor. Bridesmaids were Kelsey Campbell, Stacey Sjogren, Jessica Ziesing and Norie Burnett. Flower girl was Maya Keck. A reception was held at the church following the wedding ceremony. Lyndsay, the daughter of Jack and Marietta Bramson, of Issaquah, received an Associate of Arts degree in general studies and works at Lifeway Christian Bookstore. Clay, the son of Tim and Monica Campbell, Amy Schlilaty and Santtu Winter Schlilaty and Jason Boyett. Santtu earned a degree in civil environmental engineering from the University of Washington in He works as a staff engineer at CH2M HILL. The couple honeymooned on the Oregon Coast. They re making their first home together in Seattle. Josh Doull and Allison Schlilaty Josh earned a degree in history from the UW in He is a UW law school student in the class of The couple honeymooned in Walla Walla. They are making their first home together in Seattle. of Madison, S.D., received a Bachelor of Arts degree in worship and music, and works for Trinity Lutheran College as a multimedia technician. Following a wedding trip to Hawaii, they are at home in Bothell. Local students graduate Marlo Brown, a 2002 graduate of Liberty High School, graduated May 20 from Columbia University with a master s degree in architecture. Hilary Tanneberg will graduate from Central Washington University June 13, with a Bachelor of Science degree in accounting. Tanneberg, a 2004 graduate of Liberty High School, was also on the Lady Wildcats basketball team for four years. Kristen Curtis, of Issaquah, has been awarded a Bachelor of Science in Chemistry from Boston College. Curtis graduated with honors and was named a Scholar of the College. Kristen is a 2005 graduate of Eastside Catholic High School. Students make deans lists Jessica Stix, a 2006 Liberty High School graduate, made the WEDDINGS COLLEGE NEWS Clay Campbell and Lyndsay Bramson dean s list for the Marshall School of Business at University of Southern California for both the fall and spring semesters. She is majoring in business with a minor in cinema/television. The dean s list requires a 3.5 grade point average or higher. Phillipa Herman, of Issaquah, and Ryan Harter, of Sammamish, were named to the dean s list for the 2009 spring semester at Northwest Nazarene University in Nampa, Idaho. To be eligible for the honor, students must earn a 3.5 grade point average while taking at least 12 graded credit hours of classes. Stephanie Kriewall has been named to the dean s list at Wisconsin Lutheran College, in Milwaukee. To qualify, a student must achieve a grade point average of 3.6 or higher. Kriewall, a math major, is the daughter of Dave and Judy Kriewall, of Issaquah. PETS OF THE WEEK Tony, a 4-year-old orangeand-white tabby, is ready to greet you with happy meows. Tony enjoys napping in sunbeams and having his chin scratched. We brush and play with Tony, but he d much rather have his own person to love! Diego, a 1-year-old Chihuahua mix, would love to be your new best friend. He loves to be carried around and especially enjoys squeaky toys. If you are looking to add more love or laughter to your life, come and meet Diego. These pets may already have been adopted by the time you see these photos. If you re interested in adopting these or other animals, contact the Humane Society for Seattle/King County at , go to or All adopted animals go home spayed/neutered, microchipped and vaccinated, with 30 days of free pet health insurance and a certificate for an examination by a King County veterinarian. The Seattle Humane Society is now open from noon - 6 p.m. seven days a week. ANNIVERSARIES Lila and Jim Pendell in 1959 Lila and Jim Pendell in 2009 Pendells celebrate 50th anniversary This summer, the Pendell family is celebrating the 50th wedding anniversary of Jim and Lila Pendell, who were married April 25, Both graduated from Issaquah High School. They resided in Langs celebrate 50th anniversary Al and Betsy Lang celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary March 7 at the Space Needle with their daughter and son-in-law Kathy and Gary McIntosh; son Brook Lang; and grandchildren Breanne, Bryce, Ava, Gia and Lola. The Langs were married in Youngstown, Ohio, after college graduation (Purdue and Ohio Weslyan) and spent their honeymoon driving to Seattle for Al s job with The Boeing Co., and Betsy s job with KOMO-TV. They have lived in Issaquah on Lake Sammamish for 44 years. Cuts for a Cause tops $600 Cuts for a Cause fundraiser during the Relay 4 Life event May raised more than $600 and collected 15 ponytail donations for Pantene Beautiful Lengths, an American Cancer Society partner, to turn into wigs for cancer patients. Stylists Merrie Reith and Cynthia Smith, from Pure Indulgence, performed 23 haircuts during the four-hour fundraiser. Alzheimer s groups give support Alzheimer s Association caregiver support groups provide a consistent and caring place for people to learn, share and gain emotional support from others who are also on a unique journey of providing care to a person with dementia. Preston/Issaquah for 31 years of their married life. Jim and Lila currently split their time living in Kent and Bullhead City, Ariz. Jim and Lila have two children son Chuck and grandsons Garrett and Cliff, of San Francisco, and daughter Roxanne and her husband, Mark Shinn, of Newcastle. WHO S NEWS Al and Betsy Lang City employee gets president s award At the District and Municipal Court Management Association Conference, Lynne Jacobs, the city of Issaquah s court administrator, was presented with the President s Award. Only one award is given out each year to an individual for outstanding work and contributions to the association. Meetings are free and open to all care partners, family members and friends of individuals with dementia, and are led by trained volunteers who receive ongoing technical support and training from the chapter office. Learn more by calling toll-free or go to Coming June GRADUATION PICTORIAL A special keepsake section with photos from graduation ceremonies for Issaquah, Liberty and Skyline high schools. in PHOTO PRINTS AVAILABLE issaquahpress.com $1.00 OFF any Salad Carry out or delivery Call in or order online Can be combined with other offers Issaquah location only * Must present coupon Exp. 7/31/09 $4.00 OFF any 16 Pizza Carry out or delivery Call in or order online * Not valid with any other offer Issaquah location only * Must present coupon Exp. 7/31/09 $3.00 OFF any 12 Pizza Carry out or delivery Call in or order online * Not valid with any other offer Issaquah location only * Must present coupon Exp. 7/31/09 $5.00 OFF any 18 Pizza Carry out or delivery Call in or order online * Not valid with any other offer Issaquah location only * Must present coupon Exp. 7/31/ NW Gilman Blvd. (near QFC)

9 Robert R. Sandy Brown Jr. OBITUARIES ther of Susan and Mark, and brother of Mike Brown, Donna Robert R. Sandy Brown Jr., of Mattox and Roberta Swezey. Sammamish, died June 5, Remembrances can be made to He was 72. the American Cancer Society, P.O. A private service was held. Box 19140, Seattle, WA Robert was born June 9, See the full obituary and online He was the husband of Judy, fa- guest book at Donna M. Carson Donna M. Carson, of Issaquah, died May 31, 2009, at Evergreen Hospice in Kirkland. She was 79. A funeral service is at 12:30 p.m. Wednesday, Donna Carson June 10, at Flintoft s Issaquah Funeral Home, 540 E. Sunset Way. Burial will be follow at Upper Hillside Cemetery, Issaquah. Donna was born Jan. 2, 1930, in Chewiah, Wash., the daughter of Wayne and Marie Carson. She William E. Chase William E. Chase, of Issaquah, died May 22, He was 53. A Memorial Service will be at 2 p.m. June 13 at the Baptist Church of Preston, S.E. 86th St. William Chase Immediately following will be a celebration of Free meal FROM PAGE B1 The food bank has mostly canned goods, which are great, but this is mostly fresh food, said another man in line. Since children have been coming as well, the group has expanded its options, providing hard-boiled eggs, more sandwiches and string cheese, all of which have lots of protein, Ottinger said. At the group s busiest, the members will feed nearly 100 men, women and children who come to the food and clothing bank. People in Issaquah are so giving. They just have to be invited, Ottinger said. It s lunch. Why New park FROM PAGE B1 was raised in Chewiah until age 14, when she moved to Vancouver, Wash. She received an associate degree from Edmonds Community College. On July 7, 1956, she married Frank Carson in Stevenson, Wash. They moved to Issaquah in She was a social worker and was an accomplished artist in all media. Survivors include her husband Frank Carson, of Issaquah; three sons, John Byars, of Maple Valley, Brian Byars, of Seattle, and Kris Carson, of Mount Vernon; three grandchildren; and five greatgrandchildren. Arrangements are by Flintoft s Funeral Home and Crematory. Friends are invited to share memories and sign the family s online guest book at Bill s life at his home in Preston. Bill, who was born Jan. 13, 1956, was a friend, brother, cousin, uncle, father and grandfather. He was also an animal lover, Harley enthusiast and master mechanic. He resided in the Issaquah area for many years, and also lived in various states from Alaska to Maine. Bill was loved by many and will be missed. Remembrances can be made to the UW Cancer Center and the Preston Food Bank. wouldn t you share lunch? If someone didn t have a sandwich, you d give them half of yours. But the group is looking for help and hoping its efforts will inspire others to break bread with those in the community who are less fortunate. We don t want to limit it because there are many people that might want to do this and they don t have to be of any particular religion, Howard-Brook said. It s so easy to say, They don t deserve it or they re lazy or I work harder than they do, Ottinger said. But until we re face to face, we don t realize how we really are all the same. I want people to see how easy it is to create a great spirit, and how being part of this experience can reduce the differences between us. Chris Hysom, Port Blakely s director of legislative affairs. Port Blakely Communities contracts with a landscape maintenance company to maintain the park. While the park is owned by Port Blakely, it is open to the public to enjoy, Boeker said. Reach Reporter Jim Feehan at , ext. 239, or Comment on this story at Festival FROM PAGE B1 saquah, Bellevue, Mercer Island, North Bend, Snoqualmie Pass, Snoqualmie, Fall City, Seattle and Ellensburg. The Greenway Trust is a nonprofit organization founded in It oversees 1.4 million acres of natural land, stretching along I-90 from the Puget Sound to Central Washington. It works to preserve this land by repairing trails and supporting open land protection, among other activities. Fenders on Front Street Issaquah will host nine events, including a guided hike covering the city s historical mining operations June 20 and Fenders on Front Street, one of the largest car shows in the area, on June 21. Organizers know they ve got an exciting event on their hands in the car show, if only the weather would cooperate. Coordinator Joe Forkner said the show s first year in 2005 proved to be the best attended. About 800 classic cars lined Front Street and filled the parking lots around the XXX Rootbeer Drive-in restaurant. Unfortunately, it rained the second year and only about 200 cars showed. The weather affected turnout last year as well, with the extreme heat limiting participation to about 400. But even with 400 cars, we still had 1,000 people attend, Forkner said. Sponsor DownTown Issaquah Association is offering more attractions. Live music will play at a stage in front of Mills Music. Art galleries will be open. Food will be provided by Stan s Bar-B- Q, Fischer Meats, Flying Pie Pizza, Front Street Café and the Eagles Lodge will cook breakfast. Jose Enciso Sr., the owner of XXX, will offer the restaurant s classic Ford bus to shuttle weary walkers from the restaurant, Gilman Village, Dogwood and Sunset streets. New lungs FROM PAGE B1 would have to lose their life to give me mine. So, I prayed for my donor every day, that they were living a life filled with joy. I also prayed for their family, she said. I would love to meet the family and thank them, and let them know the gift they gave has affected so many other lives. Despite heavy scarring and nearly two years deterioration of her lungs before joining the transplant list, her surgery was successful, even though the initial recovery was hard, Mulligan said. I want to emphasize how important it is, Trulson-Essenberg IF YOU GO Issaquah Salmon Hatchery Fin Days 11:30 a.m. - 3 p.m. June Issaquah Salmon Hatchery, 125 W. Sunset Way Issaquah Farmers Market 9 a.m. - 2 p.m. June 20 Pickering Barn, th Ave Coal Creek Trail Hike 9:30 a.m. June 20 Issaquah Trails Center, 110 S.E. Bush St. Issaquah and Superior Mine Hike 10 a.m. June 20 Issaquah Train Depot, 50 Rainier Blvd. N. Downtown Issaquah History Hike 1 p.m. June 20 Issaquah Train Depot Fenders on Front Street Car Show and Cruise 8 a.m. - 3 p.m. June 21 Front Street, from Gilman Boulevard to Sunset Way Red Town Loop Hike 9:30 a.m. June 21 Issaquah Trails Center Grand Ridge Mine Hike 10 a.m. June 21 Issaquah Train Depot Coal Creek Falls Loop Hike June 21 Issaquah Trails Center call Learn more and get a detailed list of events at It worked really well last year, Forkner said. So, we decided to bring it back as a centerpiece this year. For classic car owners, Forkner said the first 500 will each get commemorative dash plaques, and 10 to 12 trophies will be awarded in various categories. The day culminates with a parade of cars at 3 p.m., down Front Street, west on Sunset, north on Newport to state Route 900, then back down Gilman Boulevard, when the drivers are then free to go their separate ways. said. My life has totally, totally changed because of someone s gift, and I know I m one of God s miracles and I give him all the glory. Today, she said she spends her time doing whatever she feels like. Much of that time is dedicated to helping other people going through the transplant process. I hope my story gives them courage to pursue this further, she said. She also spends time with her family, waiting for the arrival of her first grandson, painting and walking vigorously, in attempts to walk longer distances faster. I heard a rumor if you don t finish in four hours, they shuttle you to the finish line, she said. There is no way I m going to be shuttled to the finish line. THOMAS R. QUICKSTAD, DDS FAMILY DENTISTRY ON THE PLATEAU SINCE 1989 Wednesday, June 10, 2009 B3 Bike safety fair returns for fourth year in Issaquah BY CHANTELLE LUSEBRINK On your mark. Get tuned. Stay safe. Elementary school students and their families are invited to the fourth annual Bike Safety Fair on June 13 at Issaquah Valley Elementary School. Our goal is to prevent accidents, said Miho Reed, a member of the Optimist Club of Issaquah and the Eastside and chair for the event. Every single time we hold the event, we have people who say they know of a kid who had an accident. Students in kindergarten through fifth grades in the Issaquah, Bellevue and Lake Washington school districts can bring their bikes for free tuneups, get properly fitted for helmets, learn rules of the road and ride through a bicycle obstacle course. Issaquah and Bellevue police officers will help fit children with helmets and teach them the rules of the road. Between 500 children and 900 children have participated in each of the previous Bike Safety Fairs, Reed said. This year, the event is being held two days, one in Issaquah and one in Bellevue. It is also the first time the event has been open to students from all three school districts. This event teaches the importance of bike safety and instills the importance of wearing a helmet, Reed added. Wearing a helmet reduces the risk of head and brain injuries between 85 and 88 percent, so it makes a dramatic difference, said Karen Johnson, public relations specialist for Overlake Medical Center, who added that sponsoring the event is one way to get that message out to the community. Overlake Medical Center s Urgent Care facility sees many children involved in minor bicycling accidents each year. However, they are usually minor scrapes and bruises, she said, since children with severe injuries are taken to Seattle Children s Hospital. Bicycle injuries are the second leading cause of children s hospital stays between ages 5 and 14 in the state, according to the state Department of Health. Hospitalization rates for bicycle injuries are highest among children ages For attending the event, many students will receive new helmets IF YOU GO Issaquah Valley Elementary School 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. June N.W. Holly St. Lake Hills Elementary School 2-6 p.m. June S.E. 12th St., Bellevue for free. However, there is a limited supply. Children can get their face painted and receive goody bags and balloons, and their parents can create child identification bracelets or update old ones. The things being offered are all things that are very empowering to kids and instills confidence, so they know what to do, Reed said. Other sponsors of the event are the cities of Issaquah and Bellevue,, Sammamish Review and Gregg s Cycle. While the event is free, Optimist members encourage families to bring a nonperishable food or drink item to donate to the Issaquah and Bellevue food banks, Reed said. We also want to raise awareness for summer hunger, Reed said. During this time, a lot of kids lose access to free or subsidized school lunches. Reach Reporter Chantelle Lusebrink at , ext. 241, or Comment on this story at Preventive Cleanings Sealants Teeth Bleaching Fillings SERVICES AVAILABLE: Digital X-ray (75% less radiation) Crowns Bridges Implants NEW PATIENTS WELCOME Cosmetic Veneers Dentures Extractions Providence Point. Dr. SE Issaquah, WA 98029

10 B4 HOME &GARDEN Treehouse designer lives out on a limb BY JANE GARRISON Wednesday, June 10, 2009 Use plants with an attitude BY JIM FEEHAN Peter Nelson, co-founder of the Northwest Treehouse School in Preston, stands on a spiral staircase that rings a treehouse in a 120-foot cedar tree. BY JIM FEEHAN As a youth growing up in New Jersey, Peter Nelson was fascinated with working with wood. He helped his father built a handful of treehouses and later designed his first tree house while attending high school. It was never built, but the treehouse seed was planted. Years later, an old high school friend sent Nelson an illustrated book about how to build treehouses. It inspired Nelson to write his own treehouse-building book, published in Nelson, a builder and general contractor, has gone on to write three more books about building high-end, custom treehouses. For the past 12 years, he s held workshops about building treehouses. Two years ago, he opened the Northwest Treehouse School in Preston, where he teaches treehouse design and construction. His 4-acre compound along the bank of the Raging River includes two treehouses. One is built around a 120-foot tall cedar tree with a wooden-spiral staircase. The other is built 20-feet up a Sitka spruce and includes a 30- foot wood plank suspension bridge to reach the treehouse. Treehouses provide places to get back to nature and to reconnect with the woods, he said. This is back to basics with a little bit of luxury. Nelson holds workshops and in September, he ll hold a symposium about the finer points of designing and building treehouses. The workshops, both held in May, cost $550 and sold out months ago. The symposium is $750 and typically draws people from as far away as Europe and Japan, Nelson said. The sense of magic and adventure inherent in a child s treehouse experience comes alive on a grander scale in adult treehouses. The treehouses provide a refuge from the day-to-day grind, and in some cases, serve as a luxurious full-time home. The sky is the limit when it comes to upscale treehouses. Treehouses come complete with multiple levels, beds, porches or balconies. Many of these treehouses have many of the advantages of a ground home. Professionally built versions can cost from $40,000 to $150,000 or more. The idea of building one can be a daunting project for the uninitiated. It doesn t take an engineering degree, but a little experience working with tools and lumber makes the process easier, Nelson said For experienced carpenters and builders, it typically takes 300 hours to build a high-end treehouse, he said. For the inexperienced, it can take three to four times longer, or roughly the equivalent of three years of week- See TREEHOUSE, Page B5 plant, right place says a lot. The only problem with it is Right that gardeners have to know quite a bit to follow that short and snappy advice. What is the right plant, and where is the right place? There seem to be many variables and too many choices. I used to put the right plant in the right place and stand back and expect it to grow. It didn t always work. What I ve discovered is that plants, just like kids, want your undivided attention. There are a few that don t, and those are not as revered among gardeners as those that do. It seems that the more a plant needs coddling, the more special it is considered to be. The spoiled rotten ones with an attitude are strangely considered the pick of the crop, the elite, kind of like a Louis Vuitton bag. Maybe it s a way for good gardeners to show their gardening prowess. I don t know, but I do hope they will keep doing it for the benefit of us all. In my book, most perennials are prima donnas lapping up all the attention they can get. They like their ugly leaves and past blooms nipped off; they like their soil to be kept weed-free, warm and soft; and most need a little drink now and then, sometimes with an extra shot of something in it just to get by. They love to be admired. Ignored, they wither and perhaps even die. It s just very hard for some of us with little time to spare to pamper these guys. If you work outside the home, and don t have time to even clean up your house much less the yard, you might consider some of the regular Joes for your garden. Of course, natives are always good choices that work especially well in treed yards. If you want perennials, but don t have time, consider some of the following: MASTER GARDENERS corner Saturday clinics are from 9:30 a.m. - 2 p.m. and from 10 a.m. 2 p.m. at the Issaquah Farmers Market. Come with gardening questions. Oxalis oregana (sorrel) is a native that grows well under trees, in deep shade with no additional water. It also keeps the weeds down. Sweet woodruff and sweet violet are great, blooming groundcovers that might spread so much that they become pests. But I would rather weed out those than the truly bad weeds. Geranium endressi spreads without end and blooms continuously. Epimedium covers the ground with thick, beautiful leaves, not very showy blooms and tolerates drought. I have all of the above plants in my yard, and they are not eaten by slugs or deer, if you can imagine that. They don t seem to care if I visit, nip, water, feed or compliment them. They just do their thing and are perfectly happy with themselves my kind of plants. Jane Garrison is a local master gardener and landscape architect who gardens in glacial till on the plateau. Mike s Hauling & Tractor Work TRACTOR WORK Post Holes, excavating/grading, rototilling, mowing, brush cutting, cleaning, demolition, drainage solutions DELIVERY Play chips, gravel, rock, topsoil, bark, compost REMOVAL Railroad ties, stumps, concrete, asphalt, yard waste Free Estimates Licensed & Bonded. Call anytime before 8:00 p.m. (425) CCBEXMIKESHT010DK It s easy to find the perfect color! FREE 30 MINUTE COLOR CONSULTATION! Meet with our designer any Saturday in June. Call or come in to set up your appointment. Dick Wahl s Main Street Bellevue Hours: Mon.-Fri.7-6 Sat. 9-4 Sun th Ave. NE Overlake Evans Plaza Hours: Mon.-Fri.7-6 Sat th Ave. NE Sammamish by Safeway Hours: Mon.-Fri.7-6 Sat. 9-4 Sun. 10-4

11 Treehouse FROM PAGE B4 ends. Treehouses generally are at least 6 feet off the ground, though more sophisticated ones can rest 35 feet off the ground or more on the largest of trees. The first part of a treehouse that should be designed and constructed is the platform, from which everything else is built, Nelson said. The platform is extremely important because it should be sturdy enough to hold people and whatever is built on top of it. The foundations are bolted to trees and reinforced with braces, and posts buried in the ground can also support them. Treehouses also contribute to the greening of the Northwest, Nelson said. We re not killing trees to house people, he said. We re preserving what we have left. Wednesday, June 10, 2009 B5 We re taking roofing to a higher level! Locally owned for 39 years! Giving you the best warranties in the business! (425) A 30-foot wood plank suspension bridge leads guests to a treehouse built around a Sitka spruce. The following classes are offered by Seattle Tilth in partnership with the city s Resource Conservation Office. All classes are at Pickering Barn, th Ave. N.W. Advance registration and payment is required. For more information, go to Get Ready to Garden 6-8 p.m. June 10 Learn how to get your garden ready for your summer crops. Cost is $25 for Tilth members; $35 nonmembers. 1, 2, 3 Grow a Garden 9-11 a.m. June 13 In this twohour clinic, see how simple it is to start growing food in your sunny garden. Cost is $25 for Tilth members; $35 nonmembers. Children s Garden Harvest Classes 10 a.m.-noon Wednesdays, through Oct. 7. Classes are intended for both parent and children ages 2-5 years. Cost is $20 for Seattle Tilth members; $30 nonmembers. Bug Tales June 17 Good insects crawling and flying. Ladybug Picnic July 1 and Sept. 16 Ladybugs of all shapes and sizes come to feast. Learn insect anatomy. Fantastic Flowers July 15 Taste the different plants and flowers in the garden. Get Dirty July 29 Digging, planting seeds, using tools and pulling weeds. BY JIM FEEHAN Seattle Tilth offers gardening classes Plant and Dance Aug. 5 Plant seeds, dig out weeds, water plants and have fun helping in the garden. Fly Like a Beetle Aug. 19 Discover how garden bugs, insects and spiders live and grow. Slimy Creatures Oct. 7 Meet snails, worms, slugs and other slippery critters. The Garden Hotline Booth at the Issaquah Farmer s Market 9 a.m. 2 p.m. June 20, July 18, Aug. 15, Sept. 19 and Oct. 10 Talk with a Garden Hotline educator about all of your gardening and landscaping questions. No fee. Culinary Herb Gardening 6-8 p.m. July 15 Tips for planning your herb garden, including how to select the best varieties for your site. Cost is $25 for Tilth members; $35 nonmembers. Winter Gardening 9-11 a.m. July 18 Learn how to start seeds and how to squeeze those plants into your overflowing summer garden. Cost is $25 for Tilth members; $35 nonmembers. Fall Salad Gardening 6-8 p.m. Aug. 26 Fall salad gardens are the easiest thing around and what a payoff, all you need is a little advanced planning, and four square feet, and you ll be grazing for months. Cost is $25 for Tilth members; $35 nonmembers. Composting for Apartment Dwellers 6-8 p.m. Sept. 9 A workshop for apartment and condo dwellers that have limited space, but want to recycle their food scraps into rich compost. Cost is $25 for Tilth members; $35 nonmembers. Putting the Garden to Bed 9-11 a.m. Oct. 10 Learn inexpensive or free ways to build your soil using materials on hand. Cost is $25 for Tilth members; $35 nonmembers. Founded in 1978, Seattle Tilth is a nationally recognized, nonprofit, educational organization dedicated to cultivating a sustainable community, one garden at a time. Seattle Tilth inspires and educates people to garden organically, conserve natural resources and support local food systems in order to cultivate a healthy urban environment and community. June Special - 20% OFF Select Shade Trees Bring fresh ideas to Pickering Garden open houses City officials and Seattle Tilth staffers will host two open houses for people interested in improving Pickering Farm Garden. The first open house is from 5-7 p.m. June 11 at City Hall, 130 E. Sunset Way. The second open house is from 5-7 p.m. June 25 at City Hall Northwest, th Ave. N.W. City officials formed a partnership with the Tilth to plant the seed for the garden s vision, design and growth. Officials have received several ideas for the garden, including establishing city demonstration gardens, offering hands-on educational opportunities for organic gardening, creating a hub of a connected community trail system that includes other community garden sites and connecting to a Gilman Boulevard edible landscaping parkway. Leaders want to hear more suggestions at the open houses. The garden is located on the west side of Pickering Barn. Learn more by calling the city Resource Conservation Office at Remodeling Issaquah for 33 years. Father s Day Specials From elegant maples to colorful perennials, we have everything you need this spring. Japanese maples including brilliant bloodgoods & cutleaf varieties Great selection of shade trees Fabulous perennials - new varieties of hostas, heucheras & more June Special 20% OFF shade trees Many varieties and sizes Does not include Japanese Maples While supplies last. Expires 6/30/ Issaquah-Hobart Rd. SE, Issaquah (425) Finding the right home is hard... Finding the right homeowners insurance is easy. DECKING BEAMS SIDING FENCING PANELING TRELLIS/ARBORS CUSTOM MILLING Open to the Public! Wholesale Nursery Now Open to the Public NE Redmond Fall City Road Redmond, WA (on Hwy 202 at Tolt Hill Road) Time for... Summer When quality counts Let our cedar experts assist you in the design and construction process. Delivery and pre-finishing available. ISSAQUAH CEDAR & LUMBER Fine Cedar & Millwork since E. Lake Sammamish Pkwy. SE Open Monday-Friday 7 to 5; Saturday 9 to 2 Projects! 9am-5pm Daily Additions, kitchens, baths. Remodeling of all kinds. Expert storm damage repairs Lic. No. CRAIGSC961JZ Propane Specials for Your Father s Day BBQ! Ace Wheelbarrow Regular $ Member$ Non-Member$ Mon-Fri7-7 Sat8-7 Sun9-5 See State Farm Agent: Kathy Johnson Gilman Station Issaquah Like a good neighbor, State Farm is there. STATE FARM FIRE AND CASUALTY COMPANY HOME OFFICE: BLOOMINGTON, ILLINOIS Celebrating 75 Years in Issaquah! Schultz Weed & Feed Regular $14.99 Member $9.99 Non-Member $ cf. Begins Wed., June 24th TheGrangeSupply Fuel & B50 Feed Fencing Hardware Pet Supplies Clothing Horse Tack & Gear Lawn & Garden 145NEGilmanBlvd.Issaquah (acrossfromtriplex) Ace 50 ft. Soaker Hose Regular $12.99 Member $10.99 Non-Member $11.99 UP TO Ace 3 gal. Pump Sprayer Regular $42.99 Member $36.99 Non-Member $37.99 *Pricesgoodthru 6/30/09 Limitedtostockonhand

12 B6 Wednesday, June 10, ARTS CALENDAR JUNE Enjoy tango lessons at 8 p.m. and then dancing from 8:30-11 p.m. at Grimaldi s Coffee House, 317, N.W. Gilman Blvd., Suite No. 47. Call Classical guitarist Brian Lally performs from 7-9 p.m. at Grimaldi s. 12 Cody Beebe performs from 8-11 p.m. at Stan s Bar- B-Q, 58 Front St. Call Grimaldi s presents Jazz in the Corner from 7-10 p.m. 13 The third annual Cabaret Nights, featuring performers from Issaquah, is at 7:30 p.m. at Music Works Northwest, 1430 S.E. Eastgate Way, Bellevue. Suggested donation for tickets is $15. Call or go to Ramshackle performs at 7 p.m. at Grimaldi s. Then, watch Devil Bat during movie night at 7:30 p.m. Black Horse Art Studio presents a student art show and open house from 3-7 p.m. at th Ave S.E., Sammamish. Call or go to Little Bill and the Bluenotes perform from 7:45-10 p.m. at Bake s Place. Tickets are $25. Vino Bella presents An Evening of Songs, featuring professional singers and actors performing at Village Theatre and throughout the region, from 6:30-9 p.m. There is a suggested $10 donation admission fee. Paul Green and Straight Shot performs from 8-11 p.m. at Pogacha of Issaquah. A&E Watching the art on the walk Maria Seibert, along with her dog, showcase her creative style of earrings made out of guitar picks on display inside Village Theatre s First Stage during the the Issaquah ArtWalk June 5. BY ADAM ESCHBACH BY ADAM ESCHBACH Ricco DiStefano (left), Up Front Gallery co-manager, adds some brush strokes to his painting during Art Walk. Above, Danny Croston created a totem pole made out of propane bottles and material found in scrapyards. TO SUBMIT AN ARTS CALENDAR ITEM: Call , ext. 237, or Submit A&E story ideas to High school dance at Pickering Barn will benefit food bank BY JIM FEEHAN Area high school students can contribute to a good cause while they dance the night away June 18. The dance, for sophomores, juniors and seniors only, is from 6-11 p.m. at Pickering Barn, th Ave NW. Maddie Watts, 16, a sophomore at Issaquah High School, was kicking around the idea with her friends of holding a dance following the last day of school for students in the Issaquah School District. Her father, Keith Watts, suggested the dance raise money for a charitable cause, she said. The Issaquah Food Bank was selected as the fundraising recipient. Maddie Watts and friends Rachel McAllister, Amy Allyn, Pierce Landis and Elliot Springer, former classmates at Pacific Cascade Freshman Campus, then had to decide where to hold the dance. The community center cost too much and the (Hailstone) Feed Store was too small, Maddie Watts said. So, we thought of Pickering Barn. It s a big landmark that s easy to find next to Costco. Admission is $5 with the donation of a nonperishable food item; $7 without. Amante is providing free pizza, soft drinks and salad. Teens will dance to recorded techno/club music at the event, dubbed Neon Nights Dance Under the Summer Sun. We wanted something that was easy to dance to that s not necessarily older stuff you hear on the radio, Maddie Watts said. About 15 adults will supervise the event, she said. While the event is being held in Issaquah, it is open to all high school students from the 10th grade on, she said. We ve already heard from students from Mercer Island, Sammamish and Mount Si high schools who plan to attend, she said. We re hoping to have 300 kids there, so we should raise quite a bit for the food bank. Kim Ortego, assistant to the executive director of the Issaquah Food & Clothing Bank, said the fundraiser comes at a crucial time for the food bank. We re seeing more and more families at the food bank, and during the summer, kids won t be receiving free or reduced (-price) lunches at school, Ortego said. This dance will help us a lot. Reach Reporter Jim Feehan at , ext. 239, or Comment on this story at Go shopping... Mow yard... Go to Web site of the week... Ahh, the Darwin Awards. If you haven t heard of these, you re in for a treat. The description on the site is: A Chronicle of Enterprising Demises, honoring those who improve the species... by accidentally removing themselves from it! But it might be better to say that this is about really stupid people getting what they deserve. Sigh. Some might not enjoy the stories, but we do! Have a recommendation for Web site of the week? Send it to Junipers has a big menu for casual dining Restaurant reviews are a regular feature of. Reviewers visit restaurants unannounced and pay in full for their meals. BY JIM FEEHAN If you re looking for a casual meal north of Interstate 90, stop by Junipers at the Holiday Inn. The restaurant, off the main lobby of the hotel, offers a wide selection of salads, soups and sandwiches. House specialties for lunch included salisbury steak ($10.95), northern Pacific cod and chips ($9.95), chicken fettuccini gorgonzola $10.95) and grilled chicken teriyaki ($10.95). I selected the daily special of grilled salmon with rice pilaf and steamed vegetables ($10.95). The salmon was tender and flavorful, and the steamed vegetables were cooked to perfection. The rice pilaf was JUNIPERS RESTAURANT & LOUNGE th Ave. N.W Lunch entrées start at $7.95 and top out at $ Breakfasts are from $6.75 to $ Dinner entrées range from $15.95 to $ uninspired, but passable. The prices were quite reasonable given the ample portions. My dining companion selected the northern Pacific cod and chips. The fish was flaky and delicious, and not greasy. It was good with tartar sauce, catsup, just a bit of lemon and even plain. The fresh fruit, swapped for cole slaw, was a ripe mix of cantaloupe, honeydew melon, pineapple and strawberries. The sandwich selections include a natural angus burger served on a Kaiser roll, with lettuce, tomato and onion and either Swiss, pepper jack or cheddar cheese ($8.95); basil chicken sandwich with melted provolone, lettuce and tomato served on a Kaiser roll ($8.95); the classic Rueben ($9.25); prime rib dip ($10.95); and a tuna wrap rolled into a flour tortilla ($7.95). All sandwich entrées come with either french fries, chips, a small house salad or fruit. If you have a craving for penne, pasta primavera or pizza, skip Junipers because they have no pasta dishes for lunch. If you can wait until 5 p.m., the dinner menu has two pasta dishes, a pasta ravioli ($16.95) and a fettuccine entrée ($18.95). If you can t decide between steak and chicken, try the Issaquah two-step that has grilled chicken béarnaise and top sirloin with mushroom sauce ($17.95). Meat lovers will delight in the selection of steaks: filet mignon ($24.95), top sirloin ($19.95) and flat iron steak ($15.95). Seafood entrées include cedar plank salmon $18.95, Pacific cod piccata $16.95 and grilled prawn skewers ($22.95). Junipers approach is unabashedly contemporary. It was fun to imagine where some of the travel-weary guests had arrived from as they checked in at the front counter. The service was prompt and friendly. The food server filled our water and iced tea glasses and didn t flinch when we asked to have the tab split in half. For those early risers at breakfast, choices range from traditional favorites such as french toast, waffles, pancakes and eggs Benedict. Health conscious diners will like the low-carb omelet (a veggie and cheese omelet with broccoli) and the low-carb south of the border egg dish with slices of grilled chicken and fresh avocado garnished with salsa. Serving sizes are generous, so come with a hearty appetite. So, whether it s a sit-down lunch you re looking for, a casual breakfast or a nice dinner, Junipers is a good bet. Look who s turning 60! Happy Birthday, Lorna From your men Carla, You were always a bit different, not to mention all the other wonderfulness. Congratulations grad! - Mom, Pops & Zig

13 Section C SPORTS WEDNESDAY, JUNE 10, 2009 More sports/c2 Classifieds/C4-5 Schools/C6 Jake Heaps commits to Brigham Young University BY CHRISTOPHER HUBER It s official: Skyline quarterback Jake Heaps will play for Brigham Young University. Heaps, a junior, made the verbal commitment during a press conference June 4 at a sports bar in Salt Lake City. Heaps has been one of the most heavily recruited juniors in the nation scout.com rates him the No. 1 high school quarterback in the country and is considered the top overall prospect in Washington. Heaps made the announcement alongside two other top prospects: wide receiver Ross Apo, of The Oakridge School (Arlington, Texas), and Zac Stout, a linebacker from Oaks Christian in Westlake Village, Calif. Heaps chose BYU over 25 other schools, which had all offered him scholarships to play, as of June 1. They are Alabama, Arizona State, Cal, Colorado, Duke, Florida State, Georgia, Kansas, Louisiana State, Miami, Minnesota, Mississippi State, Nebraska, Notre Dame, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Oregon State, Pitt, Stanford, South Carolina, Tennessee, UCLA, Boise State, University of Washington and Washington State University, according to a press release from a Heaps family representative. After two years starting for Skyline, Heaps is 28-0 and has led the Spartans to back-to-back state championships. He has received dozens of awards and accolades for his athleticism, including Associated Press State Player of the Year (all classes) as a junior, U.S. Army All-American invitee and the NFL 7-on-7 Passing Tournament MVP. Heaps and the Spartans will face Stout and his Oaks Christian teammates in September, when they play at Skyline Stadium on ESPN. Reach Reporter Christopher Huber at , ext. 242 or Comment on this story at Jake Heaps, of Skyline (right), with Zac Stout, of Westlake Village, Calif. (left), and Ross Apo, of Arlington, Texas, as they announced their decision to play football for Brigham Young University at a June 4 press conference at Iggy's Sports Grill in Salt Lake City. BY MARIO RUIZ / COURTESY [PROVO] DAILY HERALD Lacrosse team wins Plateau Challenge The Plateau Challenge title match came down to the final seconds June 6 at the Skyline Community Fields. Issaquah A had battled Mercer Island throughout the match, but had not done enough to pull ahead. Attackman Cannon Gardner, of Sammamish, scored the winning goal with 15 ticks left to give Issaquah A the 7-6 win and preserve an unbeaten record in the two-day event. Gardner finished the game with 5 goals, 1 assist and 1 ground ball. Issaquah Youth Lacrosse hosted the tournament, considered a second-season invitational. It brought more than 200 select seventh- and eighthgrade lacrosse players from Eastlake, Northshore, Bainbridge Island, Kirkland, Issaquah and other youth leagues across the Northwest. One team came from as far away as Clackamas, Ore. Issaquah A finished 5-0, Mercer Island went 4-1 and the Eastlake Cardinals, including mostly Sammamish youth, went 3-2. Local lacrosse teams will also participate in the much-anticipated Battle of Bothell June and the Sammamish Shootout July 3. Sounders to host camps in Issaquah, Sammamish The Seattle Sounders FC will hold a series of soccer camps this summer throughout the state. The organization will hold camps June and July at Lake Sammamish State Park. Camps will also be offered July 6-10 and Aug at Pine Lake Park in Sammamish. Programs are available for toddlers ages 2-4, a half-day camp for ages 5-15 and a fullday camp for youths ages For registration, call or Alanah Bell, of Newcastle, a sophomore at Liberty High School, and Ellie Place, a student at Issaquah s Pacific Cascade Freshman Campus, compete at last month s Cascade Springs Regatta on Lake Stevens. CONTRIBUTED Nate Brown takes a test drive in the U-17 Miss Red Dot during Tastin n Racin June 6. Thousands flock to Tastin n Racin BY CHRISTOPHER HUBER As the 1-liter boats powered around the 1-mile course, the unlimited teams fired up their turbine engines to make sure things were in working order. The barbecue smoke wafted throughout Lake Sammamish State Park and eventgoers from across the state wandered through rows of area restaurant and business vendors and artist booths. Rock music blared from the main stage. The rain suppressed the mood for only a few moments June 6 at the first full day of the 13th annual Tastin n Racin festival in Issaquah. But as soon as the thunderous engines of the vintage hydroplanes roared to life, a little sprinkle didn t matter. The low drone of the piston engines echoed across town and up the plateau. It drew tens of thousands to the park to enjoy food, music, games and two full days of boat racing and exhibitions June 6-7. There s so much for the kids to BY ADAM ESCHBACH The crew of hydroplane 19, of 5 Star Racing, inspects the damage after their hydroplane collided with hydroplane 17 during the Grand Prix finals. do, said Tanya Cannon, of Camano Island. I like it. I would ve brought my dogs. This was her first time taking part in the festival, which featured a rock-climbing wall, two beer gardens, an Elvis impersonator, a classic car show, the Seafair Pirates, numerous bands and dozens of boat races and competitions. Cannon, with her son Seth, spent the entire day perusing booths, eating delectable food and watching the races. She found the vast range of hydroplane and boat BY JIM FEEHAN Asolid work ethic is paying dividends for Alanah Bell. The sophomore, who lives in Newcastle and attends Liberty High School, can be found practicing rowing three hours a day, every weekday on Lake Sammamish. For the past 11 months, she s been competing for the Sammamish Rowing Association. Last month, she won the Cascade Springs Regatta on Lake Stevens women s junior novice double event with Ellie Place, a student at the Pacific Cascade BY ADAM ESCHBACH types to be educational. I love it, because I don t know anything about em, Cannon said as she watched Seth at the facepainting booth. We will definitely come back. The weekend was also a chance for dozens of boat-racing teams from across the Northwest to either qualify for a next-level race, have fun driving fast or work out kinks before the season begins this summer. The festival included the KZOK Cup, featuring boats like the vintage Miss O Boy Oberto and Miss Thriftway, as well as the PWC (jet skis) Regional Qualifier races. For the Preston-based Our Gang Racing team, it was a chance to test a new rudder and show the fans what 175 mph looks like on Lake Sammamish. The unlimitedclass hydros did not race, but were part of the exhibitions each day. It was awesome, said Our Gang Racing crew member Nate Brown after taking the U-17 Miss See HYDROS, Page C2 Liberty High School teen among region s top rowers Freshman Campus in Issaquah. In March, Bell was a member of the winning women s junior varsity eight race at the Green Lake Spring Regatta. Last summer, she had planned to turn out for volleyball until a friend suggested she give rowing a try. I like pushing myself to the extent of my physical limits, she said. It also makes you feel good about yourself afterward. She said that mastering endurance and technique challenges her every day, but the key to winning a race is trust. A rower must See ROWER, Page C2 Local athletes shine in state feeder games PRESS STAFF REPORT The high-school baseball careers for some local players ended on a high note last week in senior feeder games. The feeder games are part of the Washington State Baseball Coaches Association selection process for its annual all-star series June in Yakima. Unlike previous years, there was no doubleheader between the 4A and 3A KingCo Conference teams. Rather, 4A had its own feeder game June 4 at Woodinville, while the 3A played Metro League seniors June 6 at Bellevue s Bannerwood Park. In the 4A game, the Crest Division defeated the Crown Division Issaquah High School s Miles Perkins had two hits for the Crest. Dustin Talley, of Issaquah, also smacked a triple. It was a good way to end it for them, Issaquah coach Rob Reese said. Perkins and Talley were the only Issaquah seniors selected for the nine-inning game. Blake Fulghum, Ryan Somers, Ryan Gilchrist and Jake Knecht represented Skyline High School. Somers was nominated for the all-state series. Final selections had not been released as of June 8. In the 3A feeder game, Metro scored 10 runs in the seventh inning and walloped KingCo Colby Morse, of Bainbridge, highlighted the seventh inning for Metro with a grand slam. It was a pretty close game until then, Liberty High School coach Steve Darnell said. We had one pitcher who was sick and couldn t play. We just ran out of pitching. Eric Peterson and Eric Etter were Liberty s representatives in the game. Peterson, 3A KingCo s Player of the Year, had two hits. One of the hits, a solo home run, came on his final at bat. Peterson finished the season with 12 home runs in 26 games, a new school record, according to Darnell. It was great for a fantastic kid like him to go out with a big bang like that, Darnell said. Peterson, a shortstop, was nominated for the all-state series. Darnell also said Etter, an outfielder, made an outstanding defensive play. All-league teams chosen Two Skyline players were chosen on the 4A all-kingco first team, pitcher Adrian Sampson and Somers. The latter was picked as a utility player. Issaquah outfielder Spencer Rogers also earned first-team honors. Issaquah had Perkins, an outfielder, and Shane Yarnell, a pitcher, on the second team. See FEEDERS, Page C2

14 Youth baseball Senior American Legion June 7 Games LAKESIDE 7, TAYLOR BASEBALL 4 Lakeside Taylor Shane Yarnell, Cole Wiper (7) and Devin O Donnell; Swannack, Acker (6) and Sloan. W: Yarnell (1-0), L: Swannack. Sv: Wiper (1). 2B: Shawn Ellis (L). Lakeside highlights: Trace Tam Sing 3-4, 2 RBIs: O Donnell 2-3, 1 run; Ellis 2-4, 2 runs. TAYLOR BASEBALL 6, LAKESIDE 2 Lakeside Taylor x Jared Fisher, Peyton Harrod and Dan Altchech; Sullivan and Wiggins. W: Sullivan, L: Fisher (0-1). Lakeside highlights: Altchech 1-3, 1 RBI; Cole Hering 1-3, 1 RBI; Devin O Donnell 1-3, 1 run. June 6 Game LAKESIDE 9, YAKIMA BEETLES 6 Yakima Lakeside x Dasso, Calderon (6) and Oswalt; Blake Fulghum, Payton Harrod (5) and Devin O Donnell. W: Fulghum, L: Dasso. 2B: Spencer Rogers (L), O Donnell (L). 3B: Trace Tam Sing (L). HR: Tam Sing (L). Lakeside highlights: Rogers 2-3, 2 RBIs; Tam Sing 2-3, 2 RBIs, 3 runs; O Donnell 2-3, 2 RBIs. June 5 Games LAKESIDE 10, BELLEVUE LEGION 0 Bellevue Lakeside Gray, Andrews (4) and Stanaway; Colin Hering and Devin O Donnell,. W: Hering, L: Gray. 2B: Spencer Rogers (L), Kevon Zadeh (L). 3B: Rogers (L), Andrew West (L). Lakeside highlights: Rogers 3-4, 2 runs, 1 RBI; Zadeh 2-3, 2 RBIs, 2 runs; West 2-3, 1 RBI; Hering 12 Ks, 0 BB. LAKESIDE 16, BELLEVUE LEGION 3 Lakeside Bellevue Jared Lemke, Matt Houser (4) and Ryan Somers; A. Bielaski, Wagner (3) and Wagner, Talley (3). W: Lemke, L: A. Bielaski. 3B: Spencer Rogers (L). Lakeside highlights: Rogers 4-5, 3 RBIs, 3 runs; Colin Hering 3-4, 2 RBIs; Somers 2-5, 3 RBIs. Prep baseball 4A KingCo Conference (Final standings and overall records) CREST DIVISION League Season W-L W-L Redmond Skyline Newport Issaquah Eastlake Garfield CROWN DIVISION Lake Washington Woodinville Bothell Inglemoor Ballard Roosevelt A KingCo All-league Team FIRST TEAM P: Christian Kaiser (Lake Washington), Sr. P: Dylan Davis (Redmond), Soph. P: Adrian Sampson (Skyline), Jr. C: Nick Andrews (Eastlake), Sr. 1B: Eric Folkers (Lake Washington), Sr. 2B: Joey Bircher (Redmond), Jr. SS: Alex Potts (Lake Washington), Sr. 3B: Sean Murphy (Woodinville), Sr. OF: Spencer Rogers (Issaquah), Jr. OF: Colin Hering (Newport), Sr. OF: Gene Watson (Bothell), Jr. DH: Nick Smith (Eastlake), Sr. UT: Ryan Somers (Skyline), Sr. SECOND TEAM P: Shane Yarnell (Issaquah), Jr. P: Obidiah Taylor (Inglemoor), Soph. P: Brett DeRooy (Woodinville), Sr. C: Jordan Sui (Inglemoor), Sr. C: Emmett Niland (Ballard), Sr. 1B: Tyler Atkinson (Bothell), Sr. 2B: Blake Lively (Lake Washington), Sr. SS: Trace Tam Sing (Newport), Sr. 3B: Alex Reynolds (Bothell), Sr. 3B; Michael Conforto (Redmond), Soph. OF: Dylan Davis (Redmond), Soph. OF: Myles Perkins (Issaquah), Sr. OF: Chris Viltz (Lake Washington), Sr. DH: Christian Kaiser (Lake Washington), Sr. UT: Kurt Stottlemyer (Bothell), Sr. HONORABLE MENTION Eastlake: Nick Hooper, Michael Russo. Issaquah: Brennan Miller, Dustin Talley, Austin O Neil. Skyline: Jake Knecht, Shawn Ellis, Jacob Shannon, Ryan Gilchrist. 3A/2A KingCo Conference (Final standings and overall records) League Season W-L W-L Liberty Mount Si Bellevue Mercer Island Sammamish Juanita Interlake A/2A KingCo All-league Team FIRST TEAM P: John McLeod (Liberty), Jr. P: Michael Davenport (Mount Si), Sr. C: David Madson (Sammamish), Sr. 1B: David Courtney (Mount Si), Sr. 2B: Troy Colyer (Liberty), Jr. 3B: Will Minice (Sammamish), Sr. SS: Jeff Melby (Bellevue), Sr. SS: Eric Peterson (Liberty), Sr. OF: Rossco Castagno (Mount Si), Jr. OF: Spencer Nelson (Interlake), Sr. OF: Nick Moyer (Bellevue), Jr. DH: Robbie Ryan (Juanita), Jr. SECOND TEAM P-2B: Jake Collier (Bellevue), Sr. P. Will Minice (Sammamish), Sr. C: Steve Kirbach (Juanita), Sr. C: A.J.Simpson (Mercer Island), Sr. 1B: Alex Bielaski (Bellevue), Jr. 3B: Nick Hart (Liberty), Jr. SS: Willy Reel (Mercer Island), Jr. SS: Tim Proudfoot (Mount Si), Soph. OF: Troy Askins (Liberty), Jr. OF: Zack Robinson (Mount Si), Sr. OF: Taylor Anderson (Bellevue), Sr. OF: Matt Bankston (Mount Si), Soph. DH: Taylor Campbell (Mount Si), Jr. HONORABLE MENTION Liberty: Keegan Bennett, Dan Eck, Eric Etter, Conner Sjolander, Cameron Talley. Player of the year: Eric Peterson (Liberty) Coach of the year: Steve Darnell (Liberty) 3A KingCo-Metro Feeder Game Metro 14, KingCo 5 (KingCo highlights: Eric Peterson, Liberty, 2-3. solo HR). Prep softball 4A KingCo Conference (Final standings and overall records) CREST DIVISION League Season W-L W-L Issaquah Redmond Eastlake Newport Skyline Garfield CROWN DIVISION Woodinville Bothell Lake Washington Inglemoor Roosevelt Ballard A KingCo All-league Team FIRST TEAM P: Erica Hendron (Redmond), Sr. P: Mikenzie Voves (Issaquah), Jr. C: Molly Nelson (Issaquah), Sr. 1B: Kaaren Hatlen (Woodinville), sr. 2B: Erin Tsutsumoto (Newport), Sr. 3B: Lindsay Sullivan (Woodinville), Sr. SS: Maggie Wagner (Woodinville), Sr. OF: Kealey McMullen (Lake Washington), Jr. OF: Maria Reisinger (Redmond), Sr. OF: Brittany Randle (Skyline), Soph. OF: Jenna Rutherford (Inglemoor), Jr. UT: Rogin Hardy (Lake Washington), Sr. DP: Diana Hermanson (Roosevelt), Jr. SECOND TEAM P: Marie Gau (Woodinville), Jr. P: Ashley Carter (Bothell), Sr. C: Katie Engelbrecht (Woodinville), Soph. 1B: Emily Squires (Redmond), Sr. 2B: Lauren Nabseth (Redmond), Sr. 3B: Rhianna Stepler (Inglemoor), Sr. SS: Isabelle Batayola (Roosevelt), Jr. OF: Amanda Hawley (Ballard), Sr. OF: Lindsay Cristobal (Redmond), Soph. OF: Natsumi Ueda (Newport), Jr. OF: Zoe Thiemann (Woodinville), Sr. UT: Brianna Bray (Issaquah), Sr. DP: Brianna Kast (Bothell), Jr. HONORABLE MENTION Eastlake: Alexis Esser, Laura Bachman, Nicole Guptil, Lindsi Augenstein, Issaquah: Kenna Olsen, Kim Sekijima, Sarah Sekijima, Tanika Ladd, Kelly Richards. Skyline: Elaina Shawver, Ashley Smiley, Lindsay Nicholson, Anya Kamber, Amy Ziegler. 3A/2A KingCo Conference (Final standings and overall records) League Season W-L W-L Juanita Liberty Bellevue Interlake Mount Si Sammamish Mercer Island A/2A KingCo All-league team FIRST TEAM P: Kylei Sparks (Juanita), Jr. C: Gina Swan (Juanita), Soph. 1B: Brielle Buhner (Mount Si), Jr. 2B: Sarah Ostlund (Interlake), Sr. 3B: Jennifer Welch (Juanita), Sr. SS: Alix Van Zandt (Sammamish), Sr. SS: Carly Brog (Bellevue), Sr. OF: Kate Faoro (Liberty), Sr. OF: Melissa Webster (Mount Si), Sr. OF: Aris Califano (Liberty), Jr. OF: Andi Garza (Juanita), Sr. UT: Montessa Califano (Liberty), Sr. SECOND TEAM P: Alex Johnson (Mount Si), Soph. C: Taylor Carlson (Interlake),, Jr. 1B: Jessica Leach (Juanita), Jr. 2B: Kellie Shinstrom (Juanita), Jr. 3B: Maddy Schiappa (Interlake), Jr. SS: Chandler Smidt (Interlake), Jr. OF: Taylor Richartz (Mercer Island), Sr. OF: Liz Guilford (Sammamish), Sr. OF: Danielle Covello (Mount Si), Jr. UT: Maura Murphy (Mount Si), Fr. HONORABLE MENTION Liberty: Alexis Court. Prep boys soccer 4A KingCo Conference (Final standings and overall records) CREST DIVISION League Season W-L-T Pts. GF GA W-L-T Issaquah Eastlake Garfield Newport Redmond Skyline CROWN DIVISION Woodinville Roosevelt Bothell Ballard Inglemoor Lake Wash A KingCo All-league Team FIRST TEAM GK: Leo Cohen (Roosevelt) Sr. GK: Brian Schwartz (Skyline) Sr. DF: Gordon Savage (Eastlake) Sr. DF: Mike Smolkowski (Woodinville) Sr. DF: David Surdyk (Woodinville) Jr. DF: Dan Tonkovich (Roosevelt) Sr. DF: Cameron Veres (Lake Washington) Jr. DF: Brian Whitney (Newport) Jr. MF: Kentaro Bodzewski (Ballard) Sr. MF: Gabe Gonzalez (Woodinville) Sr. MF: Quinn Grisham (Issaquah) Jr. MF: Yordan Rivera (Bothell) Jr. MF: Scotty Staples (Newport) Sr. MF: Jordan Strong (Eastlake) Sr. FW: Fellipe Barros (Redmond) Sr. FW: Tolga Dilek (Roosevelt) Soph. FW: Zachary Hammond (Lake Washington) Sr. FW: Greg Testa (Ballard) Jr. Coach of the year: Brian Maahs (Roosevelt) Player of the year: Quinn Grisham (Issaquah) SECOND TEAM GK: Mark Cochran (Woodinville) Sr. GK: Login Richards (Woodinville) Jr. DF: Jared Alexander (Redmond) Sr. DF: Conor Duggan (Newport) Soph. DF: Michael Short (Eastlake) Sr. DF: Patrick Yagi (Eastlake) Sr. MF: Manuel Brugger (Issaquah) Jr. MF: Cornelius Ieremie (Newport) Soph. MF: Lucas Morais (Issaquah) Jr. MF: Michael Mullen (Roosevelt) Sr. MF: Austin Sawhill (Bothell) Sr. MF: Junpei Tsuji (Issaquah) Jr. MF: Alan Villavicencio (Bothell) Jr. FW: Preston Fawcett (Lake Washington) Sr. FW: Braxton Griffin (Skyline) Soph. FW: Spencer Hoggart (Woodinville) Sr. FW: Balin Larson (Ballard) Jr. FW: Amir Shabeneh (Eastlake) Sr. HONORABLE MENTION Issaquah: Michael Axelson, Connor Holmes, Stephen Jacobson, Tommi Koho, Larry Schneider, Andrew Schubert. Skyline: Will Cottrell, Mitchell Kim, Pedro Miola, Ben Molyneux-Elliot, Travis Strawn, Josh Twaddle. Eastlake: Renato Bandeira, Kevin Braun, Mikey Marsh, Nick Rudella. 3A/2A KingCo Conference (Final standings and overall records) League Season W-L-T Pts. GF GA W-L-T Mercer Island Mount Si Liberty Bellevue Sammamish Juanita Interlake A/2A KingCo All-league team FIRST TEAM GK: Cody Tipton (Mount Si), Sr. GK: Forrest Marowitz (Mercer Island), Sr. DF: Jed Jacobsen (Mercer Island), Sr. DF: Brad Jackson (Bellevue), Sr. DF: Matt Johnson (Mercer Island), Jr. DF: Matt Lider (Sammamish), Sr. DF: Taylor Ward (Mercer Island), Jr. DF: Dean Byron (Liberty), Jr. MF: Chris Morris (Mercer Island), Sr. MF: Liam Kelly (Bellevue), Sr. MF: Leland Mattheaus (Sammamish), Sr. MF: Mason Bochner (Juanita), Sr. MF: Jordan Con (Interlake), Sr. FW: Andy Fordyce (Interlake), Jr. FW: Race Sciabica (Bellevue), Jr. FW: Danny Strome (Mercer Island), Jr. SECOND TEAM GK: Issac Velarde (Sammamish), Jr. GK: Alex Woehlbrandt (Liberty), Sr. SPORTS CALENDAR Adult Sports Issaquah Alps Trail Club June 10, 9:30 a.m., Talapus and Olallie Lakes, 7.5 miles, 2,200 gain. Call June 13, 1 p.m., Return to Newcastle Coal Creek History, 3 miles, 600 gain. Call June 20, 9 a.m., Greenway Days Mount Si Hike, 8 miles, 3,500 gain. Call June 20, 9:30 a.m., Coal Creek Trail, 6 miles, 600 gain. Call Cascade Bicycle Club June 11, 6:30 p.m., Eastside Tour, miles, from Marymoor Tennis Courts. Call June 12, 9 a.m., To The Pass, 60-plus miles from Quigley Park in Fall City. Call June 13, 8 a.m., Flying Wheels Summer Century Ride, rides of 100, 65, 45 and 25 miles start at Marymoor Park Velodrome. The 100-mile loop goes through Carnation, Fall City, Issaquah, Snohomish, Monroe and back to Redmond. The 45-mile loop goes through Carnation, Fall City, Issaquah and back to Redmond. The 65-mile loop goes to Duvall, Carnation, Fall City, Issaquah and back to Redmond. The 25-mile loop goes around Lake Sammamish and through Bellevue. Call Running June 13, 9 a.m., Cougar Mountain Trails Run, 7 miles, at Sky Country trailhead. Register online at Flag football June 21, the Issaquah Football Program and the IHS Booster Club Football Committee sponsors a Flag Football Tournament to raise funds for the 2009 high school football team. Tournament has open division (18 and older), and youth division (grades 6, 7, 8). For further information, call or go to Youth sports/activities Football Issaquah Youth Football is currently registering players for the 2009 season. Registration continues through June 30. Register at Swim lessons at Julius Boehm Pool Register online, at the pool or by phone at with a Visa or Mastercard. Wrestling camp June 29-July 3, 9 a.m.-2:30 p.m., Skyline Commuter Camp features Olympic Silver Medalist Sammie Henson at Skyline High School for boys and girls grades For application, go to or call Baseball June 20-22, 9-11:30 a.m., Seattle Mariners hold a hitting camp for players 7-13 at Beaver Lake Park, and June 23-24, Mariners hold a pitching camp at Beaver Lake Park. Call June 22-25, 9 a.m.-2 p.m., Field of Champions baseball camp for youngsters 8-12, at Pine Lake Park. June 30-July 2, 10-noon, Field of Champions camp for catchers, ages 8-12, Call Basketball July 7-10, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., the Skyllne High School girls basketball program holds a camp for girls, entering the third grade through the ninth grade in the fall. Players will work on basketball offensive and defensive fundamentals, play games and compete in a variety of contests for awards. Register at Youth baseball Senior American Legion June 13, 6 p.m., Honda Baseball at Lakeside (Newport High); June 16, 5 p.m., Shoreline Legion at Lakeside (Bannerwood Park); June 18, 8 p.m., Lakeside at Rips Brewers (Denny Park). Sandy Koufax June 13, 6 p.m., Ravens at Issaquah Dragons (Tibbets Park); June 14, 9 a.m., Rock Creek at Issaquah Dragons (Tibbetts Park); June 17, 6 p.m., Stampede at Issaquah Dragons (Central Park, Issaquah Highlands); June 18, 7:30 p.m., Issaquah Dragons at Sting (Edmonds CC). SCOREBOARD C2 Wednesday, JUNE 10, 2009 DF: Troy Hightower (Bellevue), Sr. DF: Sam Joselyn (Mount Si), Jr. DF: Sam Evans (Mount Si), Jr. DF: Jensen Brehm (Bellevue), Sr. DF: Taylor Young (Bellevue), Sr. DF: Nathan Wigley (Sammamish), Jr. MF: Garrett Lee (Juanita), Jr. MF: Eric Baumgartner (Mount Si), Soph. MF: Doug Slivius (Mount Si), Jr. MF: Tyler Ybarra (Mercer Island), Jr. MF: Taylor Backous (Sammamish), Jr. FW: Dakota McKay (Liberty), Sr. FW: Nick Ward (Mercer Island), Jr. FW: Diego Corvaland (Mercer Island), Sr. HONORABLE MENTION Liberty: Cody Sorteberg, Jr.; Jay Haberman, Jr.; Kevin Barretto, Jr. Player of the year: Chris Morris (Mercer Island) Coach of the year: Steve Newman (Mercer Island) Girls track & field Combined Events Championship At Lake Stevens High School Decathlon 100 meters: 5, Eva Perry (Issaquah) : 3, Perry 1: High jump: 3, Perry Long jump: 6, Perry Prep boys lacrosse Washington State League DIVISION I ALL-STATE TEAM First Team GK: Bryce Stevenson (Bainbridge), Sr. DF: Dugan McDermot (Bainbridge), Sr. DF: Connor McClain (Issaquah), Sr. DF: Connor Beckwith (Mercer Island), Jr. DF: Alex Candoo (Bellevue), Sr. MF: Landon Carr (Curtis), Sr. MF: Jake Director (Issaquah), Sr. MF: Cole Nordstrom (Bellevue), Jr. MF: Jordan Goldstein (Issaquah), Sr. AT: Daniel Shields (Mercer Island), Sr. AT: Sam Snow (Bainbridge), Sr. AT: Kyle Mutzel (Bellevue), Sr. Second Team GK: Hap Giraud (Mercer Island), Jr. DF: Connor Rafferty (Mercer Island), Jr. DF: Austin Franks (Vashon), Jr. DF: Danny Vais (Eastlake), Jr. DF: Andrew Johnson (Skyline), Sr. MF: Kevin Nguyen (Bainbridge), Sr. MF: Taylor Wisman (Northshore), Jr. MF: Steve Caditz (Mercer Island), Sr. MF: Calvin Wiley (Skyline), Sr. MF: David Schoettler (Seattle Prep), Sr. AT: Todd Jones (Issaquah), Jr. AT: Taylor Dean (Curtis), Jr. AT: Jake Fritz (Issaquah), Soph. Honorable mention Issaquah: DF Tyler Lucas, Soph. Prep girls lacrosse Washington State League DIVISION II ALL-STATE TEAM GK: Teagan Cameron (Issaquah), Jr. DF: Johmi Fry (Snohomish), Soph. DF: Kristina King (Bellevue East), Soph. DF: Molly Nemerever (Mercer Island), Soph. DF: Kailey Strachan (Bainbridge), Jr. MF: Corral Camp (Mercer Island), Soph. MF: Emily Dalrymple (Snohomish), Soph. MF: Mallory Glebe (North Kitsap), Sr. MF: Brittany Hogan (Issaquah), Soph. MF: Natalie Merrill (Kennedy), Jr. MF: Bea Shiffer (Bainbridge), Fr. MF: Allie Wilson (Tahoma), Jr. AT: Alex Foreman (Eastside Catholic), Soph. AT: Katie Mincen (Issaquah), Soph. AT: Maddie Soukup (Bainbridge), Soph. AT: Sophie Wolz (Bellevue East), Fr. Youth boys lacrosse Plateau Challenge SENIOR DIVISION Title Game Issaquah 7, Mercer Island 6 (Issaquah statistics: Ryan Benz 2 asists, Cannon Gardner 5 goals, 1 assist, 1 ground ball; Peyton Pelluer 1 ground ball, Julian Ritchie 2 goals, Henry Jarvis 3 ground balls, Nate Allard 2 ground balls, Brady Hahn 7 saves). Running Issaquah Triathlon 10K RUN Top male finishers: 1, Karl Leioh (Issaquah) 51:47; 2, Jared Remington (Seattle) 52:43; 3, Alejandro Aguirre- Rivad (Sammamish) 53:33; 4, Chris Famy (Pittsburgh) 53:39; 5, William Templeton (Seattle) 54:07; 6, Elan Ellinger (Bellevue) 54:44; 7, Doug MacLean (Mercer Island) 55:06; 8, Brady Borel (Bellevue) 58:01; 9, Patrick Flynn (Issaquah) 58:53; 10, Ferdinand Saulon (Sammamish) 58:53. Top female finishers: 1, Alison Schock (Sammamish) 52:52; 2, Lisa Collins (Bellevue) 53:11; 3, Irene Tulleau (Woodinville) 54:35; 4, Wendy Loomis (Seattle) 55:17; 5, Florence Stahura (Sammamish) 55:24; 6, Shannon Lampman (Issaquah) 55:33; 7, Jennifer Harris (Seattle) 55:49; 8, Nancy Delanoy (Sammamish) 56:03; 9, Ariana Valsman (Redmond) 56;22; 10, Kathryn Skinner (Redmond) 56:48. Top masters males: 1, Karl Leioh (Issaquah) 51:47; 4, Kurt Peterson (Sammamish) 1:01.:14; 5, Paul Rikkinen (Sammamish) 1:07:02. Top masters females: 1, Irene Tulleau (Woodinville) 54:35; 3, Florence Stahura (Sammamish) 55:24; 4, Nancy Delanoy (Sammamish) 56:03; 7, Tena Carter (Sammamish) 1:09:52; 8, Tracy Vedder (Issaquah) 1:25:50; 9, Whitney Ferguson (Sammamish) 1:56:11. Top local finishers: 1, Karl Leioh (Issaquah) 51:47; 3, Alison Schock (Sammamish) 52:52; 5, Alejandro Aguirre-Rivad (Sammamish) 53:33; 12, Florence Stahura (Sammamish) 55:24; 13, Shannon Lampman (Issaquah) 55:33; 15, Nancy Delanoy (Sammamish) 56:03; 19, Patrick Flynn (Issaquah) 58:53; 20, Ferdinand Saulon (Sammamish) 58:53; 23, Jill Hoopes (Issaquah) 59:55. Youth swimming Pacific Coast Invitational At King County Aquatic Center Results for Issaquah Swim Team and other local swimmers: GIRLS 12-and-under 400 freestyle: 14, Sophie Luehmann (IST) 5:46.22; 16, McKenna Mossman (IST) 5:48.29; 17, Kathy Lin (IST) 5:51.28; 19, Hanna Schwinn (IST) 5:58.23; 30, Stephanie Young (IST) 6: individual medley: 5, Brigid Mackey (IST) 2:46.65; 16, Lin 3:00.04; 19, Luehmann 3:03.14; 22, Mossman 3:09.18; 30, Schwinn 3:15.68; 35, Young 3: freestyle: 2, Mackey 10: medley relay: 3, IST A (Luehmann, Alexandra Smerekanych, Mackey, Anastasia Kosykh) 2: , IST B (Young, Siani Beck, Mossman, Jessica Clark) 2: butterfly: 1, Mackey 1:14.98; 13, Kosykh 1:23.09; 19, Luehmann 1:27.38; 35, Mossman 1:35.48; 38, Young 1:36.57; 41, Sophia Davis (IST) 1:37.09; 42, Clark 1: freestyle: 10, Mackey 31.25; 12, Kosykh 31.67; 23, Luehmann 32.85; 27, Mossman 33.33; 63, Annette Guo (IST) 37.01, Clark 37:01; 74, Elyse Kaczmarek (IST) 37.88; 77, Young 37.97; 79, Beck 38.35; 85, Davis breaststroke: 8, Mackey 3:13.76; 12, Kosykh 3:17.98; 30, Beck 3:38.15; 34, Davis 3:41.10; 38, Guo 3: backstroke: 16, Luehmann 1:23.89; 17, Smerekanych 1:24.30; 32, Mossman 1:30.58; 56, Young 1:36.38; 64, Kaczmarek 1:42.38; 68, Guo 1: individual medley: 11, Smerekanych 6: freestyle relay: 4, IST A (Mackenna Briggs, Smerekanych, Mackey, Kosykh) 2:06.55; 13, IST B (Lin, Lindsey Hanger, Guo, Lily Newton) 2:20.87; 21, IST C (Allyson Haase, Gianna Castro, Young, Beck) 2: butterfly: 2, Mackey 2:52.32; 4, Smerekanych 3:03.12; 5, Kosykh 3:06.62; 9, Newton 3: backstroke: 32, Young 42.28; 46, Castro 43:.7; 51, Guo 44.09; 61, Haase 45.84; 69, Hanger butterfly: 17, Lin 37.70; 45, Kaczmarek 43.53; 48, Haase 44.29; 53, Hanger backstroke: 7, Kosykh 2:45.48; 9, Mackey 2:50.21; 11, Briggs 2:51.40; 22, Newton 3:06.35; 27, Mossman 3:14.84; 39, Castro 3: freestyle: 14, Mackey 1:09.48; 18, Briggs 1:10.40; 22, Smerekanych 1:11.53; 56, Beck 1:21.63; 75, Castro 1: breaststroke: 6, Lin 1:32.02; 9, Kosykh 1:33.45; 10, Smerekanych 1:33.88; 28, Mossman 1:42.17; 29, Beck 1:42.55; 33, Guo 1:45.43; 46, Kaczmarek 1: freestyle: 15, Briggs 2:36.47; 21, Mossman 2:40.70; 25, Newton 2:42.70; 29, Lin 2:46.95; 42, Young 2:58.53; 47, Haase 3:02.35; 51, Hanger 3:05.44; 53, Beck 3:06.01; 54, Guo 3:06.34; 57, Kaczmarek 3: freestyle: 9, Maria Volodkevich (IST) 5:06.28; 21, Kennedi Norris (IST) 5:38.58; 22, Hayley Magee (IST) 5: individual medley: 2, Katie Kinnear (IST) 2:29.15; 4, Volodkevich 2:34.57; 5, Elise Tinseth (IST) 2:36.44; 9, Kayla Flaten (IST) 2:40.25; 10, Stacy Maier (IST) 2:40.72; 13, Andi Scarcello (IST) 2:43.90; 15, Kayla DiMicco (IST) 2:45.08; 16, Jessie Dart (IST) 2:45.61; 18, Shanley Miller (IST) 2:47.23; 19, Stephanie Munoz (IST) 2:47.83; 21, Abby Magee (IST) 2:48.72; 24, Yui Umezawa (IST) 2:50.12; 28, Sarah Elderkin (IST) 2:54.38; 31, Norris 2:56.82; 35, H. Magee 3: freestyle: 2, Tinseth 10:32.22; 4, Munoz 10:49.73; 5, Scarcello 10:50.65; 7, Elderkin 11:04.37; 8, DiMicco 11:05.18; 9, Dart 11;09.48; 12, Miller 11:30.77; 13, Becca Fabian (IST) 11:45.69; 14, Cassie Burgess (IST) 11:47.95; 15, Umezawa 11: ,500 freestyle: 2, Kinnear 18:56.39; 4, Maier 19:00.09; 8, Flaten 19: medley relay: 1, IST A (Maier, Volodkevich, Kinnear, Flaten) 2:07.22; 3, IST B (A. Magee, Scarcello, Tinseth, DiMicco) 2:16.30; 4, IST C (Munoz, Dart, Umezawa, Fabian) 2: butterfly: 8, Flaten 2:48.43; 11, Tinseth 2:49.64; 12, Munoz 2:51.74; 14. Maier 2:53.16; 15, Volodkevich 2:54.06; 18, DiMicco 2:55.81; 21, Scarcello 3:02.27; 22, Dart 3:02.47; 23, Miller 3:02.51; 24, Fabian 3:04.09; 27, A. Magee 3:08.94; 28, Umezawa 3:11.15; 32, Norris 3:15.60; 34, Burgess 3: breaststroke: 4, Volodkevich 1:20.53; 8, Scarcello 1:23.88; 11, Kinnear 1:24.79; 18, Tinseth 1:27.02; 23, Miller 1:29.22; 28, Maier 1:31.34; 35, DiMicco 1:33.85; 38, Munoz 1:34.28; 43, H. Magee 1:35.62; 46, Umezawa 1:36.67; 47, A. Magee 1: freestyle: 1, Kinnear 27.62; 8, Flaten 29.57; 16, Fabian 30.69; 20, Burgess 30.73; 24, Munoz 31.10; 34, Scarcello 31.81; 41, Dart 32.32; 46, Taylor Pearlstein (IST) 32.68; 54, Norris 33.22; 61, H. Magee 34.45; 73, Libby Kaczmarek (IST) backstroke: 1, Kinnear 1:07.71; 7, Volodkevich 1:14.26; 10, Maier 1:14.77; 14, Tinseth 1:16.53; 21, DiMicco 1:18.03; 40, Miller 1:25.27; 44, H. Magee 1: individual medley: 5, Flaten 5:38.37; 9, Dart 5:42.75; 18, Umezawa 5:57.75; 22, A. Magee 6:04.47; 24, Fabian 6:06.72; 31, Norris 6:23.82; 33, Burgess 6:27.06; 34, Pearlstein 6:33.64; 35, Kaczmarek 6: freestyle relay: 1, IST A (Maier, Volodkevich, Flaten, Kinnear) 1:55.60; 3, IST B (Tinseth, DiMicco, Elderkin, Munoz) 2:02.09; 4, IST C (Umezawa, Fabian, Scarcello, Burgess) 2:03.21; 7, IST D (A. Magee, Norris, Dart, Miller) 2: breaststroke: 5, Tinseth 2:59.26; 6, Flaten 2:59.63; 7, Dart 3:00.16; 8, Kinnear 3:00.44; 16, Maier 3:09.05; 19, Fabian 3:12.14; 28, Norris 3:17.95; 29, Andrea Price (IST) 3:19.53; 34, Munoz 3:21.12; 38, Umezawa 3:25.12; 45, A. Magee 3:33.85; 46, Burgess 3:33.87; 49, Kaczmarek 3: freestyle: 8, Volodkevich 1:04.61; 11, DiMicco 1:05.93; 17, Munoz 1:07.03; 36, Miller 1:10.26; 46, Elderkin 1:12.50; 51, H. Magee 1:13.21; 55, Norris 1: backstroke: 1, Kinnear 2:27.99; 6, Volodkevich 2:38.97; 9, Tinseth 2:39.89; 11, Umezawa 2:41.86; 15, Scarcello 2:44.54; 17, A. Magee 2:45.36; 21, Dart 2:47.54; 28, Flaten 2:53.35; 29, Price 2:56.20; 37, Kaczmarek 3:02.09; 42, Burgess 3:03.46; 45, H. Magee 3: butterfly: 2, Maier 1:10.39; 8, Tinseth 1:14.11; 10, DiMicco 1:14.78; 12, Munoz 1:15.45; 14, Scarcello 1:16.49; 17, Umezawa 1:19.14; 18, Fabian 1:19.40; 20, A. Magee 1:19.85; 22, Miller 1:20.66; 26, Elderkin 1:24.00; 31, Norris 1:25.08; 41, H. Magee 1: freestyle: 3, Kinnear 2:13.59; 5, Flaten 2:17.90; 6, Maier 2:18.59; 7, Volodkevich 2:18.81; 22, Scarcello 2:27.81; 26, Dart 2:29.21; 28, DiMicco 2:29.93; 36, Burgess 2:32.38; 39, Miller 2:35.24; 49, Elderkin 2:39.12; 52, Fabian 2:40.16; 57, Price 2:45.57; 60, Kaczmarek 2: individual medley: 2, Kara Beauchamp (IST) 2:34.03; 16, Caitlin Duffner (IST) 2:49.51; 19, Kimberly Rogers (IST) 2:53.55; 20, Jordan Lee (IST) 2: freestyle: 3, Duffner 11:05.02; 5, Rogers 11:33.86; 6, Lee 11:58.87; 7, Ali Hartlein (IST) 12: ,500 freestyle: 3, Beauchamp 19: medley relay: 2, IST A (Helen Liu, Beauchamp, Nina Zook, Lee) 2:13.79; 12, IST B (Sarah Allen, Rogers, Hailey Theeuwen, Hartlein) 2: butterfly: 3, Beauchamp 2:34.54; 4, Zook 2:37.67; 6, Meghan O Keefe (BC) 2:38.55; 17, Duffner 2:49.91; 19, Rogers 2:54.35; 26, Theeuwen 3:00.07; 30, Lee 3:20.58; 31, Hartlein 3: breaststroke: 6, O Keefe 1:24.41; 12, Liu 1:26.51; 17, Lee 1:29.13; 29, Duffner 1:34.01; 42, Theeuwen 1: freestyle: 2, Liu 29.04; 6, Beauchamp 29.46; 23, Zook 31.43; 36, Theeuwen 32.82; 41, Hartlein 32.95; 44, Duffner 33.10; 45, Rogers backstroke: 6, Liu 1:12.41; 10, Beauchamp 1:15.00; 14, O Keefe 1:17.20; 39, Rogers 1: individual medley: 7, Zook 5:36.47; 22, Lee 6:18.50; 24, Hartlein 6: and-over 200 freestyle relay: 4, IST (Zook, Lee, Liu, Beauchamp) 2: breaststroke: 1, Beauchamp 2:46.08; 12, Zook 3:07.41; 19, Liu 3:10.51; 20, Lee 3:10.76; 26, Duffner 3:18.88; 32, Hartlein 3: freestyle: 11, Liu 1:05.60; 43, Lee 1: backstroke: 5, Beauchamp 2:37.80; 24, Hartlein 3: butterfly: 7, Zook 1:10.44; 23, Duffner 1:16.52; 43, Lee 1: freestyle: 2, Beauchamp 2:17.52; 11, Liu 2:24.83, Zook 2:24.83; 24, Duffner 2: and-over 100 breaststroke: 17, Sarah Allen (IST) 1: freestyle: 8, Danielle Palumbo (BC) backstroke: 3, Palumbo 1: individual medley: 10, Allen 6: butterfly: 11, Allen 1: freestyle: 16, Allen 2: BOYS 12-and-under 400 freestyle: 3, Connor Broughton (IST) 5:22.09; 6, Jackson Berman (IST) 5:29.18; 12, Elliot Schwinn (IST) 5:41.61; 22, Connor Schwinn (IST) 6:12.86; 27, Dane Williams (IST 7: individual medley: 11, Berman 3:02.64; 12, E. Schwinn 3:03.72; 22, C. Schwinn 3: , Williams 3: medley relay: 1, IST A (Nicholas Klatt, Benjamin Nussbaum, Ben Gore, Berman) 2:25.37; 7, IST B (Brandon Leu, Broughton, Ryan Kinnear, Toby Plaskon) 2:41.41; 10, IST C (Williams, Keith Nussbaum, E. Schwinn, C. Schwinn) 2: butterfly: 5, Gore 1:17.03; 7, Jacob Leahy (IST) 1:20.21; 9, Broughton 1:23.20; 13, Kinnear 1:25.51; 16, Klatt 1:26.14; 17, E. Schwinn 1:26.29; 21, Berman 1:28.67; 28, K. Nussbaum 1:36.50; 37, C. Schwinn 1:42.86; 39, Leu 1:45.62; 43, Williams 1: breaststroke: 44, Williams 1: breaststroke: 6, E. Schwinn 3:18.82; 7, B. Nussbaum 3:22.11; 8, Klatt 3:22.36; 14, Gore 3:30.20; 26, C. Schwinn 3: freestyle: 11, Leahy 32.62; 30, Berman 34.41; 39, Kinnear 35.32; 44, Leu 35.69; 56, C. Schwinn 36.71; 65, Plaskon backstroke: 6, Gore 1:22.04; 9, B. Nussbaum 1:23.73; 10, Leahy 1:24.34; 12, Kinnear 1:25.50; 14, Berman 1:25.98; 30, Leu 1:32.37; 32, E. Schwinn 1:32.46; 43, K. Nussbaum 1:36.70; 46, Plaskon 1:37.90; 51, Williams 1: individual medley: 6, Klatt 5:59.56; 13, B. Nussbaum 6: freestyle relay: 1, IST A (Leahy, Gore, Klatt, B. Nussbaum) 2:07.16; 8, IST B (Broughton, Berman, Kinnear, K. Nussbuam) 2:17.20; 11, IST C (Williams, C. Schwinn, E. Schwinn, Leu) 2: butterfly: 6, Broughton 3:06.08; 9, Klatt 3: backstroke: 6, Leahy 37.77; 10, Gore 38.29; 16, Kinnear 39.67; 35, Plaskon 42.48; 52, Williams butterfly: 4, Gore 34.65; 12, Kinnear 37.67; 39, Plaskon 46.98; 40, Williams backstroke: 4, Klatt 2:46.67; 11, Berman 2:57.07; 19, K. Nussbaum 3: freestyle: 3, B. Nussbaum 1:11.01; 6, Broughton 1:11.79; 17, Leahy 1:14.57; 21, Berman 1:15.18; 30, E. Schwinn 1:16.67; 40, C. Schwinn 1:19.81; 41, Leu 1:19.83; 46, K. Nussbaum 1:20.53; 58, Plaskon 1:24.14; 67, Williams 1: breaststroke: 7, Klatt 1:34.90; 8, E. Schwinn 1:34.94; 10, Gore 1:36.23; 13, Broughton 1:37.83; 28, K. Nussbaum 1:41.52; 30, C. Schwinn 1: freestyle: 9, B. Nussbaum 2:35.74; 15, C. Schwinn 2:41.91; 23, Kinnear 2:49.55; 32, Leu 2: individual medley: 3, Ben Allen (IST) 2:29.02; 4, Austin Melody (IST) 2: trust in her ability to do her best through rigorous training. Bell must also trust that her fellow rowers are giving 100 percent, until the last catch of the oar-blade. The fluid motion of the oars, a perfect synchronization of rowing motion, has no discernible end or beginning. You need all eight people rowing as hard as they can, she said. You certainly learn to work hard and not give up easily to succeed in rowing. Earlier this year, Bell attended a speech given by U.S. rower Anna Cummins, who won a silver medal in the 2004 Olympic Games in Athens and a gold in Beijing last year. Cummins grew up in Bellevue and in 1998 graduated from Newport High School, where she won 12 varsity letters in cross country, basketball and track. She was a distance runner and wanted to run at the University of Washington, but instead ended up in the rowing program. She entered UW women s rowing, an absolute beginner in the sport. But within two years, she was a member of the U.S. national rowing team. Cummins speech inspired Bell to dream big. If you aim high and set your mind to it, you can accomplish anything, Bell said. Rower FROM PAGE C1 Earning honorable mention from Issaquah were Brennan Miller, Talley and Austin O Neill; from Skyline, were Knecht, Shawn Ellis, Jacob Shannon and Gilchrist. Liberty had three players on the 3A/2A all-kingco first team pitcher John McLeod, second baseman Troy Colyer and Peterson. Third baseman Nick Hart and outfielder Troy Askins, of Liberty, were picked on the second team. Earning honorable mention from Liberty, the regular-season league champion, were Keegan Bennett, Dan Eck, Etter, Conner Sjolander and Cameron Talley. Darnell was selected as the league s Coach of the Year. In his first season as head coach, Liberty had a 20-5 record and reached the state regionals. Feeders FROM PAGE C1 Red Dot for a spin June 6. I was real happy. Nate Brown stood in for regular driver Kip Brown, who participated in two other hydro races at Tastin n Racin. As he reviewed computer data from the run, he said he hit approximately 175 mph on the short straightaway. The main reason we re here, other than to help sponsors, is also to test a new rudder, Nate Brown said. It s perfect. Sixty boats and 70 jet skis participated in the festivities this year, said event executive director Christine Courtright. With official numbers not reported at press time, Courtright estimated attendance to possibly have doubled over the 37,000 who attended in We had a lot more people than we thought we would, she said. There were twice as many people, but they were just distributed better. Every year, we seem to figure out one more thing and I think we figured out a layout that worked for people. Organizers are already thinking ahead to 2010, when they hope to host a national PWC qualifier race on Lake Sammamish. Hydros FROM PAGE C TASTIN N RACIN RACE RESULTS Pro Stock: 1. Dave Rankin; 2. Levi Weber; 3. Ryan Butler Super Stock: 1. Dave Rankin; 2. Sid Rennels; 3. Levi Weber One Liter: 1. Perkins Glass; 2. Robby Dahlquist; 3. Bianca Bonacinni 2.5 Mod: 1. Rob Hall; 2. Gerry Jarvis; 3. Shawn Warren 2.5 Stock: 1. Scott Meyers; 2. Joe Gutierez; 3. Austin Eacret 5 Liter: 1. Justin Weymouth; 2. Wally Johnston; 3. Barry Eacret National Mod: 1. Rod Bourke; 2. Mack Elliott; 3. Rob Hall Grand Prix: 1. Hopp Racing; 2. Rick Bridgeman; 3. Tom Eckenberg

15 Wednesday, JUNE 10, 2009 C3 Your Eastside Headquarters for Boy Scouts, Cub Scouts, & Girl Scouts Basic required uniforms Handbooks Neckerchiefs And more! (For all ranks) We have EVERYTHING you need! 145 NE Gilman Blvd., Issaquah, WA (Across from Triple X) M-F 7-7 Sat 8-7 Sun THE VARDI MUSIC STUDIO A violinist of amazing elegance and musicianship...a natural performer. ROBERT KIMBALL NEW YORK POST Lenore Vardi, has recently relocated from New York City to Seattle s East Side. Now accepting violin and viola students of all ages by audition Summer Camps 128 players at Eastside FC were state champions in 2009! Are you next? Come train at the club where 8 of the state champion teams in 2009 were built! Overview: Designed for players U8 and older, our summer camps focus on individual skill development in a fun, relaxed atmosphere. Exercises, games, drills, and scrimmages are used to teach a variety of ball handling techniques in a fun and enjoyable context. Schedule: All sessions held at Preston Park in Preston, WA. July 13 - July 17. 9:00AM - 12:00PM July 13 - July 17. 1:00PM - 4:00PM Aug 17 - Aug 21. 9:00AM - 12:00PM Cost: $100 for EYSA players plus $10 off for additional kids in family. Includes EFC Training t-shirt. $125 for non-eysa athletes. Register now space is limited! Visit questions to NEW LOCATION in Downtown Issaquah Skills for Life Gymnastics Classes for all ages (425) Backstage Dance Studio Hip Hop Ballet Tap Jazz Lyrical Musical Theatre Creative Movement Ages 2 to Adult Summer Camps Register Now! SE 32nd Bellevue (425)

16 c4 Wednesday, June 10 Classifieds T HE I SSAQUAH P RESS 0 To place your ad call Deadline: Monday Noon FREE ADS FOR personal items under $150 1-Homes For Sale DUPLEX, LOCATION, LOCA- TION, LOCATION! In heart of charming downtown Issaquah. Well-maintained, reduced price, $595,000. Owner, Garage Sales this week! (1) ISSAQUAH/SOUTH COVE and 3 surrounding neighborhoods Annual Garage Sale! South end of Lake Sammamish. Entrances at 188th Ave. SE and 192nd Ave. SE off of West Lake Sammamish Pkwy SE. Friday/Saturday, 6/12 and 6/13, 9am-4pm. This is the one you wait for. (4) MULTI-FAMILY GARAGE SALE, Saturday, June 13, 9am-3pm. Some antiques, collectibiles, miscellaneous furniture. All sorts of stuff you never knew you neede!! th Ave SE, North Bend (7) BEST G-SALE IN Trossachs. Something for everyone! Toys, games, jewelry, kitchen/bath items, bikes, books, & more! Friday/Saturday, June 12/13, 9am-3pm th Place SE, Sammamish Condo/Townhouses ISSAQUAH, PRICED TO Sell. Providence Point condo. 55+, great amenities, 2BD/1.75BA, desired corner, top floor, immaculate. Give away price $210,000. Call Tom, Owner/Broker, (2) MULTI-FAMILY GARAGE Sale, Trossachs, SE 26th Place, Sammamish June 13, 9am-3pm. Household goods, girls clothes (6-10), toys, small furniture. (5) COMMUNITY GARAGE SALE,"Beaver Lake Park", th Court SE, Sammamish. Park once, 5+ homes, Friday/Saturday, June 12-13, 8:30-4pm. Large playset, kids clothes, everything! Pink signs. (8) RIVERBEND COMMUNTY Garage Sale, June 20/21, 9am-4pm. Over 500 houses!! Take I-90, Exit 32, right to 437th Ave SE, turn right at Riverbend reader board Equal Opportunity Employer Looking for an opportunity to make a difference, and really connect to your patients in a refreshing and natural environment? At Snoqualmie Valley Hospital, we pride ourselves on our direct patient centered care philosophy. We have the following opportunities available: Please submit resumes and applications to: Snoqualmie Valley Hospital Attn: Human Resources 9575 Ethan Wade Way SE Snoqualmie, WA Telephone: Fax: Lots/acreage 20 ACRE RANCHES!! $0 down! Near Booming El Paso, Texas. $15,900, $159/month! Beautiful mountain views, road access. Money Back guarantee. Owner Financing. No credit checks. 1(800) <w> 7 (3) SAMMAMISH, WAVERLY Hills, th Ave SE. Multi-family, Friday/Saturday, 6/12th-13th, 9am-4pm. Quality clothing/accessories, household, linens, slot machine, lamps, movies/books/art, antiques/collectibles, much more!! No Early Birds!! SE 32nd off E Lake Sammamish Pkwy, near the 7-11 (6) TREE FARM COMMUNI- TY Garage Sale, Saturday, June 13, 9am-1pm. NE 8th St/242nd Ave NE across from Inglewood Junior High. Variety of items from multiple homes. Nurses- Registered Nurses (RN) - Opportunity available Full-Time Med/Surg. Physical Therapy Assistant (Part or Full Time) - Experienced PTA needed with minimum of 3 years experience for inpatient and/or outpatient treatment environment. Must have WA license and be capable of treating a wide range of diagnoses. ED Technician - Assists a dynamic healthcare team in delivering patient care to emergency room patients. This includes, but is not limited to registering patients, preparing patients for examinations and treatments, taking patient histories and vital signs, obtaining specimens, setting-up rooms with necessary supplies and equipment, and assisting physicians and staff nurses during treatments. Shifts are variable, primarily 7p-7a. Must be able to be licensed as a healthcare assistant with Categories A, C, & E. Prefer Certificate of completion of a basic Nursing Assistant course. Current Healthcare Provider BLS, medical terminology and computer skills required. Per Diem opportunities - If you are interested in employment with SVH, but we currently are not seeking your specialty in a Full-time or Part-time capacity, please consider employment in a Per Diem capacity. The following positions are open for on-going Per Diem recruitment: Emergency Room (RN) Noc Shift Medical/Surgical Floor (RN) Occupational Therapists Endoscopy RN Physical Therapists Certified Nursing Assistant Ultrasound/Sonagrapher Xray CT Tech Medical Laboratory Technician/Medical Technologists - Looking for experienced MLT or MT to join our expanding Laboratory Department. Successful candidates will have excellent interpersonal skills, & ability to function independently, while still working as part of a team. Position is part-time/nights. Social Worker MSW - Full-time opening for social worker with inpatient hospital experience to work with patients admitted to acute medical beds in addition to patients admitted to our medical/ surgical rehabilitation program. Program involves a strong multidisciplinary treatment team approach with emphasis on patient/family involvement in assessment, treatment and discharge planning. MSW required. LICSW/ LASW preferred. Occupational Therapist - Per Diem opening for licensed occupational therapist experienced in comprehensive evaluation and treatment of a variety of inpatient and outpatient populations and diagnoses, particularly elder adult. Collaborates with interdisciplinary treatment team, including COTA to coordinate and provide skilled services and discharge plans. Successful candidate is experienced in program planning, and supervision of Assistants, Aides, and OT students. Prior experience in hospital and/or long-term care environment with a minimum of three years required. Housekeeper - Responsible for the daily cleaning and sanitation of the hospital; must be willing to work as a team, yet function independently. Must be able to bend, lift, and carry up to 50lbs. Prior experience working in a healthcare/ hospital setting strongly preferred. Hours are per diem Lots/acreage VIEW LOTS, SEA of Cortez, Baja, Mexico. Only $40,000. Quality of life. Affordable living. All utilities. Safe, secure ownership. Financing. Contact VistaDelMarSan <w> RENTALS 13-Apartments Unfurnished DUVALL- LARGE 2 Bedroom Apt. Washer/Dryer, Hardwood Floors, Huge Deck, Nice Views, Quiet Peaceful setting. One avail. Now! and another on 8-1. $895 Mo+util. You owe it to yourself to see this one! Steve, ISSAQUAH NEAR DOWN- TOWN. Spacious 2BD/1BA in 4-plex. Major upgrades, deck, mountain view. Quiet park-like setting. NS/NP. $890/month MOTHER-IN-LAW APART- MENT FOR rent, $950/month including utilities. NS/NP. Details: jgacpa1.home.comcast. net MOVE-IN SPECIAL, PARK Place Apts. 1BD, $795 rent/$500 deposit. Secured building, quiet, close to Gillman. Pets OK. Section 8. Move-in special. Call Apartments Furnished RETIRED RN DESIRES 2BD for July-September. Janette or Lynda Duplexes ISSAQUAH DUPLEX 2BR/ 1BA, W/D, NS/NP, near community center/schools/downtown, $1000/month Condo/Townhouse 2BD/2 FULL BATH condo for rent $1250/month. First month half off, with 12 month lease. One mile from I-90, Exit 13, Issaquah BELLEVUE/ISSAQUAH/ MONTREUX, 2BD/2 full baths condo. All appliances, parking, $1290/month, House Sitting RETIRED RN AVAILABLE to house sit July, August and September. Call Lynda or Janette (cell) Rooms UNFURNISHED ROOMS FOR rent. 865 Highwood Drive SW, Issaquah. Cooking/laundry privileges, no pets/smoking/drugs. $450/month plus deposit / / Hall Rentals PINE LAKE COMMUNITY Center, Wedding receptions, Meetings, Aerobics classes RENT GIBSON HALL: parties, receptions, rummage sales; kitchen facilities. $50/hr Vacation Rentals SKI & SAVE 20% at Sun Peaks Resort, B.C.! Vacation rentals of new Condos & Chalets, 1-4 bdrms, full kitchen, F/P, hot tubs, slope-side locations, 1(800) <w> WE RE BUYING! Old COINS and CURRENCY Gold & Silver Bullion Scrap Gold Jewelry Sterling Silverware Diamonds & Gemstones Vintage Wristwatches & Early Pocket Watches Antique & Modern Firearms ******************************** Get Top Dollar for your items! STOP IN TODAY FOR OUR BUY OFFERS and immediate cash! RARE COIN GALLERIES 1175 NW Gilman Blvd, B TO ADVERTISE USE CLASSIFIEDS Ext. 222 Best Prices On the Plateau for the square footage Sara s Crossing Home for Sale 3,220 square foot home with 5 bedrooms, 2.5 baths and a fantastic sunrise view of Cascades from front of home! Each bedroom has walk-in closet - Master has 2! Huge bonus room easily holds pool table. Tile Offered at $570,000 upgrades in kitchen and master bath. Sara s Crossing has a community playground. Jacob s Creek Condominium for Sale Stunning 1349 sq. ft. Craftsman built condo with 2 bedrooms and 1.75 baths. Updates include hardwood and granite countertops in kitchen with stainless appliances. Home features two fireplaces. Large patio overlooks walking trails and open space. Best priced home in Jacob s Creek per Offered at $329,500 FULL & PART-TIME POSITIONS Work outdoors generating Orders for FREE health & Safety Inspections of residential Trees & Shrubs. Flexible Hours Up to $1000/week Travel, Cell & Medical Allowances REQUIRED Drivers License Reliable Transportation Internet Access Cell Phone APPLY ONLINE TODAY: EvergreenTLC.com ext square ft! FINANCIAL 41-Money & Finance $$BAJILLIONS AVAILA- BLE$$. FOR good contracts/notes and Deeds of Trust, from all kinds of Real Estates sold. Skip Foss et al 1(800) <w> LOCAL PRIVATE INVESTOR loans money on real estate equity. I loan on houses, raw land, commercial property and property development. Call Eric at 1(800) , <w> 44-Business Opportunity ALL CASH VENDING! Do you earn $800 in a day? Your own local candy route. Includes 25 machines and candy all for $9,995. 1(888) <w> LOOMIX FEED SUPPLE- MENTS is seeking Dealers. Motivated individuals with cattle knowledge and community ties. Contact to find out if there is a Dealership opportunity in your area. <w> OWN A COMPUTER, Work From Anywhere. Two Step Process. Request Online Info, review. Set-up phone interview. $1500PT/$5000FT. Serious people only. <w> PART-TIME, HOME BASED Internet business. Earn $500- $1,000/month or more. Flexible hours. Training provided. No selling required. Free details. <w> MERCHANDISE 55-Appliances MAYTAG 21 CU Ft, side by side refrigerator/freezer, $100 OBO. Excellent condition, Clothing MEN S XL TABASCO shirt (new) for the 4th of July, $ Furniture ESTATE SALE, HIDE-A-BED, $150, matching loveseat $100, coffee table $50, antique pie crust table $100, secretary desk $150, bedroom set (double) and triple dresser $150/set, wrought iron double bed w/mattress/springs $150, La-Z-Boy $100, bookcase $50. mahogany Queen Anne dining table w/four chairs, $ NICE 44 ROUND white tiled table with leaf, $ Musical VERY NICE HAMMOND electric organ with matching bench, $ Misc. For Sale BARN FULL OF OLD/ANTI- QUE miscellaneous collectibles including 1904 Sears horse buggy. Has good wheels, top frame and shafts, $500, needs restoration. 3HP Briggs engine, $ Misc. For Sale STEEL BUILDINGS RECESSION DISCOUNT 18X21 Reg $6,279 Now, $4,186 36X51 Reg $15,047 Now $10, X105 Reg $87,362 Now $58,241 + Code Adj, Erection Available Source#0Y3 Phone: Wanted WANTED TO BUY OLD GOLD Have any gold tucked away in a drawer somewhere? Are there a few stones among the menagerie of bent metal? We ll check it for you. Who knows, it could pay for dinner or maybe a lot more. Also buying vintage pocket watches & wrist watches. NAULT JEWELERS 1175 N.W. Gilman Blvd Dogs OBEDIENCE & AGILITY CLASSES Seattle Agility Center Twelve miles from downtown Issaquah on Maple Valley Hwy TRANSPORTATION 91-Autos $$CASH$$ FOR JUNK AUTOS & TRUCKS Bodies & Frames Hauled Budget Auto Wrecking 2007 VW JETTA. Fully loaded Automatic, Charcoal Grey Exterior, Grey Leather interior. Excellent Condition with low mileage. Call Great graduation present! Only $17, TO ADVERTISE USE CLASSIFIEDS Ext. 222 Real Estate Marketplace FOUR CREEKS COUNTRY LIVING $824,999 This is a home to last a lifetime. Exceptional, high end remodel on shy acre w/sport court, rolloing green lawns & several outdoor living spaces. 4BR/2.75BA & fully remodeled. IdyllicIssaquah.com ChristineKipp.com ISSAQUAH 4-PLEX $799,000 Turn key operation, great for investor or owner occupied. Excellant income and occupancy rate w/waiting list of Tenants. Great location! Fenced yards & private decks. 2BDRM units. Lots of parking. # Catherine Taylor TROSSACHS CLASSY CONTEMPORARY $695,000 One of the most distinctive homes in Trossachs! JF Buchan const w/ striking arch, all the right spaces, classy fixtures & finishes, refinished hdwds + gardener s yard & circular drive. 4BR/2.5BA/3658SF # ChristineKipp.com NEW ON MARKET! $565,000 Newly remodeled rambler in popular Field Rush neighborhood. Easy commute access, walk to shopping. 5 piece marble bath, granite kitchen, new carpet thruout. Private corner lot with great street appeal! # Catherine Taylor SUPER FINISHES $489,000 Don t wait to see this fantastic 4BR,2.5BA home! Open Kitchen boasts granite tile counters, great cabinetry & stainless appl. Newer Cherry vanity w/vessel sink & new lighting in Main Bath. Den downstairs. # Lois Schneider CHARMER IN SAMMAMISH $439,000 4 br/2.5 ba/2 fplcs./2-car gar. on.45 acre. New carpet, new interior paint, new stainless steel appl. Covered gutters, white vinyl windows. Lots of extra parking for RV, etc. & a gardener s delight. # Linnea Fulton FANTASTIC OPTIONS $435,000 Great piece of property to build on or enjoy the starter home already there! 2BR w/brick fireplace in Living rm, wood stove in Master, office space off covered back porch. Open floor plan. 2 car carport. # Lois Schneider GREAT PRIVACY $400,000 Fantastic place to build, 1mile from downtown Redmond! Property on sewer. Private gulley on 1 side of property gives privacy. Outside fireplace under covered deck. Rent house until your permits are ready! # Lois Schneider NW Sammamish Rd. Issaquah FEATURED HOME RESIDENTIAL RESIDENTIAL FAIRWOOD $399,500 BY APPT: 4 bedroom/2.5 bath updated Maple View Estates home. 1/3 acre lot w/sport court and mountain views. # Tim Church ISSAQUAH $530,000 BY APPT: Updtd 3 bedroom/ 2 bath rambler. Hdwds, granite, frpl, new roof, deck, hot tub. RV pkg. 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Fax resume or office.net MAIL CLINIC, GILMAN, is looking for a highly motivated and customer service-oriented person to join our team. We are a fast-paced, customer service-oriented mailbox and shipping outlet. The position will be part-time. Computer experience preferred. Pay will start at $9.50/hr., D.O.E. Please resume to: www. mailclinic.net; PART-TIME DISHWASHER COME JOIN OUR TEAM! Apply at Bellewood Retirement Apts Providence Pt. Dr. SE Issaquah, WA Or send to 135-Help Wanted-Other A TRAVELING FUN Job! Travel the USA. Must be neat, outgoing and free to travel. Start immediately. No experience necessary.call Mr. T <w> ABLE TO TRAVEL: Hiring eight people, no experience necessary, transportation & lodging furnished, expense paid training. Work/travel entire U.S. Start immediately. Call <w> DRIVER -- CURRENTLY HIR- ING Experienced Teams and Solos with HazMat. Dry Van & Temp Control available. O/Os welcome. Call Covenant (866) EOE <w> WE NEE D A JOB! 139-Work Wanted CHILD CARE/NANNY POSI- TION wanted. Have raised, cared for, taught, loved children COMMERCIAL CREDIT/FI- NANCIAL Analyst, 25 years experience. Commercial real estate, inventory, A/R, equipment lending background. Seeking contract/permanent employment HR/OFFICE MANAGER WITH over 15 years experience in the high tech field seeks position with stable company LOOKING FOR OFFICE work I can do from home or at your office. Dependable, mature, hours/week PERSONAL SERVICES NOTICES 210-Legal Notices LEGAL NOTICE CITY OF ISSAQUAH FACILITIES MAINTENANCE NOTICE OF SURPLUS SALE The City of Issaquah is holding a surplus sale to make available to the public surplus items for purchase. The sale will take place Friday, June 19th, 2009 at Tibbetts Creek Manor, th Ave NW, between 9:00am-1:00pm. These items are offered on an As Is basis and all sales are final. Inspections of items are encouraged. Published in The Issaquah Press on 6/03/09 & 6/10/09 TO ADVERTISE USE CLASSIFIEDS Ext Legal Notices LEGAL NOTICE CITY OF ISSAQUAH NOTICE OF ORDINANCE PASSED BY ISSAQUAH CITY COUNCIL Following is a summary, by title, of the ordinance passed by the Issaquah City Council on June 1, 2009, to be published in the Issaquah Press on June 10, 2009, effective date of June 15, ORDINANCE NO AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF ISSAQUAH, WASH- INGTON, AUTHORIZING AN INTERFUND LOAN FROM THE EQUIPMENT RENTAL FUND TO THE LOCAL IM- PROVEMENT DISTRICT #24 CONSTRUCTION FUND IN AN AMOUNT NOT TO EX- CEED $1,700,000. Complete text of this ordinance is posted at City Hall, 130 E. Sunset Way and the Issaquah Public Library, 10 W. Sunset Way. Upon request to the City Clerk's Office ( ), a copy will also be mailed for a fee. Published in The Issaquah Press on LEGAL NOTICE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON, SKAGIT COUNTY PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS In the Matter of the Estate of MARIE ELAINE RICE, Deceased. ) NO ) PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS ) RCW The Personal Representative named below has been appointed as Personal Representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, prior to the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner pro- 167-Asphalt & Paving A Washington State Construction Contractor Law requires that all advertisers for construction related services include the contractor registration number BIG PAVING CO. Driveways - Parking Lots Patching - Speed Bumps Seal Coating - Crack Seal LIC# BIGPAPC935KC 171-Cleaning Services ARE YOU LOOKING FOR EXPERIENCED CLEANING HELP? 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Bed, beyond A bed was stolen during a burglary in the 400 block of Front Street South prior to 11:07 a.m. May 26. The loss is estimated at $1,000. Wrath of God Bibles, biblical literature, a leather bag and a briefcase were stolen from a Toyota Camry parked in the block of Southeast Newport Way prior to 11:45 a.m. May 26. The loss is estimated at $120. All that glitters Jewelry and a jewelry box were stolen from the 700 block of Northwest Juniper Street prior to 2:07 p.m. May 26. The loss is estimated at $1,450. Tahoe taken A Chevrolet Tahoe was stolen from Eastside Mobile Auto Glass, 60 N.W. Gilman Blvd., prior to 4:28 p.m. May 26. The loss is estimated at $10,000. Support problem A support beam was damaged on a Mercedes-Benz parked in the block of Northwest Montreux Drive prior to 9:31 p.m. May 26. Unable to locate A window was damaged and a jacket and a GPS unit were stolen from a Toyota Corolla parked at QFC, 1540 N.W. Gilman Blvd., prior to 10:38 p.m. May 26. The loss is estimated at $999. Have guitar, will travel A window was damaged and a guitar, guitar case, ipod and speakers were stolen from a Mitsubishi Montero parked in the 1500 block of Pineview Drive Northwest. The loss is estimated at $1,000. Trackback A window was damaged and a GPS unit was stolen from a Lexus RX330 parked in the 5800 block of Lac Leman Drive prior to 7:25 a.m. May 27. The loss is estimated at $800. Jeep jacked A window was damaged and a mobile phone was stolen from a Jeep parked in the 800 block of Lingering Pine Drive Northwest prior to 10:24 a.m. May 27. The loss is estimated at $900. Just push play DVD players were stolen from a Mercedes GL320 parked in the 500 block of Wilderness Peak Drive Northwest prior to 11:12 a.m. May 27. The loss is estimated at $2,800. Volkswagen vandal A window was damaged on a Volkswagen Passat parked in the block of Southeast Newport Way prior to 1:51 p.m. May 27. The loss is estimated at $100. Out of gas A vehicle blocked southbound traffic on East Lake Sammamish Parkway near Interstate 90 at 3:39 p.m. May 27. An officer waited with the driver while his wife got gasoline. When she arrived and the vehicle was fueled, it would not start. The officer helped the man push the vehicle off the roadway so he could get more gas. So clear you can hear a pin drop A person at Sprint, 6130 E. Lake Sammamish Parkway, misdialed 911 at 4:46 p.m. May 27. Out of focus A camera and lens were stolen from the 700 block of Second Avenue Northwest prior to 7:26 p.m. May 27. The loss is estimated at $830. A friend in need POLICE &FIRE Officers discovered an intoxicated Eastside Fire & Rescue reports for June 10 At 5:38 p.m. June 1, two units from Station 73 responded to a brush fire at 249th Avenue Southeast and Southeast Issaquah-Fall City Road. At 10:51 p.m. June 1, two units from Station 72 responded to a brush fire at Southeast 51st Street and Northwest Sammamish Road. At 11:40 a.m. June 2, six units and a fire investigator from Station 71 responded to a wildland fire at Southeast Jones Road and Southeast Nygren Lane. At 6:25 p.m. June 2, a unit from Station 71 responded to a bark fire at Hepler Lane Southwest and Sunrise Place Southwest. At 8:33 p.m. June 2, four units from Station 75 responded to a brush fire at 15th Place Northwest. At 5:05 p.m. June 3, five units from Station 76 responded to a cardiac arrest at Cedar Grove Road and Southeast Tiger Mountain Road. At 5:35 p.m. June 3, five units and an investigator from Station 75 responded to a brush fire at 15th Place Northwest. At 9:14 p.m. June 3, five units from Station 75 responded to a brush fire at Southeast 43rd and Southeast 44th streets. At 9:22 p.m. June 4, 12 units from Station 72 responded to a commercial structural fire at 10th and 11th avenues northwest. At 9:26 p.m. June 4, four units from Station 71 responded to a brush fire at Second and Third avenues northwest. At 10:37 p.m. June 4, two units from Station 71 responded to a Dumpster fire at Third Avenue Northwest and Fifth Avenue Northeast. At 10:47 p.m. June 4, 13 units from Station 74 responded to a brush fire on a dead end off of Southeast High Point Way. At 3:49 p.m. June 5, a unit from Station 73 responded to an appliance fire at Northeast Jacaranda Street and Northeast Katsura Street. At 6:37 p.m. June 5, 10 units from Station 74 responded to a motor vehicle accident involving a rescue situation at the Interstate 90 turnaround at Upper Preston Road Southeast. At 11:25 p.m. June 5, eight units and two chaplains from Station 71 responded to a motor vehicle accident and rescue situation at Front Street South and Southeast 104th Street. At 8:28 a.m. June 6, four units from Station 76 responded to a motor vehicle accident at 249th and 252nd avenues southeast. At 11:06 p.m. June 6, four units from Station 71 responded to a motor vehicle accident on westbound Interstate 90 at Sunset Way. At 3:03 p.m. June 7, five units and a chaplain from Station 76 responded to a cardiac arrest on Southeast Tiger Mountain Road. woman at the parking lot of the abandoned Albertsons grocery store at 11:46 p.m. May 27. Officers were conducting a bar check at Joker Pub & Grill, 5614 E. Lake Sammamish Parkway S.E. They found a sober friend of the woman to give her a ride home. Shattered glass A window was damaged in the 100 block of Mountain Park Boulevard Southwest prior to 10:17 a.m. May 28. The loss is estimated at $50. Art asylum Graffiti was discovered in the 1700 block of 10th Avenue Northwest at 11:02 a.m. May 28. The cost to remove the graffiti is estimated at $ Close shave A woman discovered a razor blade on the front seat of her car at 4:11 p.m. May 28. The car was parked in the 800 block of Second Avenue Southwest. The woman said the windows were partly down in the car while she was at work.

18 SCHOOLS Page C6 Wednesday, JUNE 10, 2009 GOLD STARS Students put their own stamp on Shakespeare Pine Lake Wolverine Philharmonic Pine Lake Middle School s Wolverine Philharmonic performed at Disneyland in its performing arts program in Anaheim, Calif., May The students participated in several workshops, like the Soundtrack Session Workshop, where they got to experience and formulate their own Disney soundtrack and took home a DVD of their recording. They also played in front of audiences and amusement park goers near Cinderella s Castle. Sunset Elementary School Sunset Elementary School students donated 50 large bags of cat and dog food, 100 cans of dog and cat food, and 20 large bags of cat litter for the student council s Humane Society drive May Brenden and Caelene Tse, two members of the student council, helped drop off the donations. Issaquah High School Roots & Shoots Issaquah Trout Unlimited and Issaquah High School s Roots & Shoots, community volunteer organizations, worked to restore Lewis Creek Stream, on the southern edge of Lake Sammamish. The groups removed invasive blackberries to make room for native plants to grow, which are more beneficial to the kokanee salmon that spawn there. Student ArtWalk Liberty High School, Maywood Middle School and Sunny Hills Elementary School artists brought inspiration to Issaquah s ArtWalk June 5 by showing their best pieces of art created during the school year. Gold Stars highlights accomplishments big or small by Issaquah students. Send a few sentences and the student s name, age, grade, school and good deed to BY ADAM ESCHBACH Juliet, played by Anna Banashak, lures Romeo, played by Patrick Frawert, to her balcony in the scene parting is such sweet sorrow. BY CHANTELLE LUSEBRINK At Pacific Cascade Freshman Campus, students are bringing new life to William Shakespeare s Romeo and Juliet. At the school s third annual Shakespeare Showcase June 5, students acted in adapted scenes from the famous play, set in the Elizabethan era, the roaring 1920s era with mobsters and the 1950s era with greasers in front of their parents, friends and teachers. It was fun to do after reading Shakespeare, said Patrick Frawert, a student who played a traditional Romeo in the balcony scene. But it took a lot of guts and skill to go out onstage. While the showcase is a voluntary event, students are required to perform adapted scenes from the play for their final, Shannon Henderson, a language arts teacher at the school, wrote in an to The Press. Romeo and Juliet is a required reading for ninth-grade students in the district, but performance is the best way to help students understand the difficult text, since performance requires close reading and deep textual analysis, she wrote. Henderson said she came up with the Shakespeare Showcase project during the school year. I was really impressed with all BY ALLISON BOLGIANO As the pressure of the college search mounts for high school juniors, one suggestion for success particularly annoys me. I m always irked when a teacher says, This would look great on your college résumé, when referring to a volunteer or extracurricular opportunity. Perhaps the reason for my annoyance is that I see volunteering as community engagement and a Schools in focus Pacific Cascade Freshman Campus the hard work students put into their performances, and it seemed a shame to me that they only got to perform once, she wrote. By the next year, the Shakespeare Showcase night was up and running, with help from language arts teacher Shona Campbell. It gives students a chance to try something that they might not normally ever do get on a stage and perform Shakespeare to a live audience, Campbell wrote in an to The Press. However, many students were more than a little uneasy at the thought of reading Shakespeare, let alone performing it. I thought it was going to be great reward, not another line on my college application. It is time our society halts turning volunteerism into a narcissistic activity and instead turns it back toward its altruistic roots. I value my volunteer experiences for the friends I have made and the character traits I have developed. Since age 9, I have been raising guide dog puppies for the blind with the local club Eager Eye Guide Dog Puppies. In this group, I have met friends and mentors of all ages, watched the beautiful partnership of man and dog, and had my heart broken by the seven dogs I no longer call my own. Most importantly, I horrible, just because of all the weird language, said Sam Torresdal, a student who played Benvolio in the 1950s adaptation. But it was really fun and I learned a lot of new dirty jokes. I was excited, because I heard Shakespeare was hard, but I wanted to see if I could do it, said Anna Banashak, who played a traditional Juliet in the balcony scene. Romeo and Juliet is perfect for ninth-graders, because it s about all the same dramas that fuel the daily lives of so many of our students, Henderson wrote. It s pretty much how teens act, said Calvin Antonetty, a student who played the nurse in the 1950s adaptation. Like when your parents don t approve of a boyfriend, added Erica Schmidt, a student who played Mercutio in the 1950s adaptation. The students can really connect to the play, because almost all of them either have been, or know someone who has been in a similar situation to the characters in the play, Henderson wrote. To help ease their nerves, students were able to watch both a traditional Romeo and Juliet film from the 1970s and the 1996 modern film adaptation. Teachers also brought in actors from the Seattle Shakespeare Co. to perform and help students learn the basics, like stage fighting, dancing and Elizabethan manners, Campbell wrote. Their hard work paid off in the end; students and teachers agreed gained a connection to other people in Issaquah who care about the same things I do. All of this will last far longer than any line on a college application. Counselors, teachers and parents who push teens into service corrupt the spirit of volunteerism. Although some teens may discover their life s passion or come to care deeply about an issue through adult-sponsored volunteering, many do service work they neither care about nor enjoy. This utter lack of engagement is a great loss. the scenes and eras flowed into one cohesive play for audiences. It s a huge thrill, especially watching students who are convinced they can never do it, get up there and perform, hear the audience gasp at a death or laugh, and appreciate a good comic performance of the nurse, Campbell wrote. They walk off the stage full of energy and delight about something they created. Volunteering needs to return to its altruistic roots Hall Monitor Allison Bolgiano Liberty High School PHOTOS BY ADAM ESCHBACH In the above scene two households, both alike in dignity, students act out a sword fight. In the scene at left, O, I am fortune s fool! Romeo, played by Andrew Eremenco, kills Tybalt, played by Jordan Johnston, in revenge for killing his best friend. If teens always chose issues to donate their time to, our volunteers would be more passionate and more numerous. The essence of volunteerism is to donate one s time and passion. Some could argue that to be a world leader or great philanthropist one must be well-educated, aiding the college application side. I think differently. Tomorrow s world leaders will find their drive in a sincere desire to better the world, not a college education. Why Do Smart Kids Fail? Celebrating 32 Years of Excellence in Education Kids, Pets n Pride Parade APPLICATION July 4th at 11 am Decorate your bike, dress up the dog and bring your noise makers to Rainier Boulevard (at the intersection of NW Dogwood and Front Street). Registration begins at 10 am and be part of the tradition in the annual Kids, Pets n Pride Parade celebrating the Down Home 4th of July. Mail or drop off your application to the Issaquah Chamber of Commerce located at 155 NW Gilman Boulevard by July 1st. Pre-registered participants appear FIRST in the parade. Participants may also bring this form to register at 10 am on Saturday, July 4. All kids on bikes MUST wear helmets! During my participation in the 2009 Down Home 4th of July, I hold harmless the Issaquah Festivals Office, the Greater Issaquah Chamber of Commerce and the City of Issaquah. Name Age Phone # in parade Address City/State/Zip Name of parent /responsible adult (please print) Signature Date Return form by July 1, 2009 to: Issaquah s Down Home 4th of July, 155 NW Gilman Blvd., Issaquah, WA (425) Your child may need help with reading, math or study skills. Our specially trained teachers and personal attention can give your child the boost he or she needs to do well this school year. If your child is unmotivated, lacks confidence, or has weak basic skills, our certified teachers and individualized programs help children overcome frustration and failure and get them on the path to success in school. 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