Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University Tallahassee, Florida 32307

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1 Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University Tallahassee, Florida COURSE SYLLABUS Course Number: RED 5336 Course Title: Foundations of Reading Required Text Prerequisite(s):None Vacca, Richard, & Joann Vacca, Content Area Reading, Pearson, Allyn & Bacon, Boston, MA., 9 th edition, Pearson Custom Publishing. ISBN-13: Course Credit: 3 credit hours Course Hours: 3 Credit Hours College: Education Department: Elementary Education Other Instructional Materials: Selected articles and columns provided by the professor. Articles from referred journals of reading such as: Journal Adolescent and Adult Literacy, Reading Research Quarterly, Reading Teacher, Journal of Language Arts, and Journal of Reading Behavior Faculty Name: Term and Year: Fall 2009 Place and Time: Core Education Complex, 5:00pm- 8:30pm Office Location: Telephone: Office Hours Other times by appointment Monday Tuesday 3:00pm-5:00pm 8:30pm-9:00pm Wednesday 3:00pm-5:00pm 8:30pm-9:00pm Thursday 3:00pm-5:00pm 8:30pm-9:00pm Friday Course Description: This course is designed to acquaint in-service teachers with the fundamental concepts and knowledge for teaching reading in the content areas. The concepts in this course will develop an awareness, understanding and appreciation of literacy practices that foster reading across the curriculum. The in-service teacher will gain knowledge of the teaching of reading by integrating curriculum across all school subject areas including social studies, science, and math. This course is designed to address the Florida A &M University Conceptual Framework. Our goal is to produce teachers who are Exemplary Professionals who are: professionally astute, academically astute, confident, analytical/reflective, proactive, and ethical. The theme Teachers as Exemplary Professionals is operationalized through the Integrated Model that also addresses the following State, National, and Learned Societies standards for producing quality

2 reading professionals: Florida Educator Accomplished Practices (FEAPS), and the Florida Subject Area Competencies (FSAC). Course Purpose: This course will prepare both elementary and secondary teachers to teach their students to competently handle the reading demands of their content area textbooks and courses. Conceptual Framework The Conceptual Framework in the Professional Education Unit (PEU) at Florida A&M University is an integrated approach to providing educational experiences that result in exemplary professional educators. The Framework is comprised of six themes with the mission of developing high quality classroom teachers, administrators and support personnel. The term exemplary refers to the kind of graduates the PEU strives to produce. The figure below provides a diagram of the Exemplary Professional Conceptual Framework: DIVERSITY CF 1 Through this focal area, the FAMU professional education candidate will: CF: 1.1 (K) Demonstrate understanding of diverse backgrounds of individuals. F: 5,6,7 I: 3 CF: 1.2 (S,D) CF: 1.3 (S,D) Demonstrate diverse student learning through differentiated instruction. F: 5,7 Create and foster learning opportunities adapted to diverse learners. F: 5,6 I: 3,8 I: 3,8 CF: 1.5 (K, S) Establish a climate that values diversity and supports learning for all students. F: 5, 7, 9, 10 I: 5 TECHNOLOGY CF 2 Through this focal area, the FAMU professional education candidate will: CF: 2.3 (K) CF: 2.4 (K) Demonstrate knowledge of fundamental concepts in technology. F: 12 I: 1,6 Demonstrate an understanding of concepts related to software, F: I: 6 hardware, and applications 2,12 2

3 CF: 2.5 (S) Use technology to prepare and teach lessons and promote creativity among students. F: 12 I: 6 VALUES CF3 Through this focal area, the FAMU professional education candidate will: CF: Work with colleagues in a professional manner. F: 6 I: 2,5 3.1 (S) CF: 3.2 (S) Use clear and accurate communication with students, families and other stakeholders. F:11,6 I: 9,10 CF: 3.3(S,D) CF: 3.4(D) CF: 3.5(D) Promote perspectives, ideas, people, and culture. F:5,6 I:3 Demonstrate achievement of goals. F: 3,9 I: 5,9 Create learning opportunities that foster cooperation, support, and individual participation among students. F: 7,2 I: 5,10 CRITICAL THINKING CF4 Through this focal area, the FAMU professional education candidate will: CF: 4.1 (K) Demonstrate an understanding of a variety of instructional / professional strategies to encourage student development of critical thinking and performance. F:4,7 I: 4 CF: 4.3 (D) Create and foster opportunities for student learners to demonstrate critical thinking and self-directed learning as habits of mind. F: 4 I: 1,4 CF: 4.5 (S) Demonstrate the use of higher order thinking skills. F: 8 I: 4 PROFESSIONALISM CF 5 Through this focal area, the FAMU professional education candidate will: CF: 5.1 (K) Know the content F: 8 I: 1 CF: 5.2 (S) Use the appropriate pedagogy to provide all students with the opportunity to learn. F:7,9 I: 7 CF: 5.3 Demonstrate commitment to personal growth & development. F:3,7 I: 3

4 (D) 9 CF: 5.4 (K,S) CF: 5.5 (S) CF: 5.6 (S) Use major concepts, principles, theories & research related to the development and acquisition of knowledge and motivation. Construct learning opportunities that support student development & acquisition of knowledge & motivation. Display effective verbal & non-verbal communication techniques to foster valuable interaction in the classroom. URBAN/RURAL EDUCATION CF6 Through this focal area, the FAMU professional education candidate will: CF: 6.1 Demonstrate the ability to work in school settings with varied levels of (S) human and material resources. CF: 6.2 (S,D) CF: 6.3 (K) CF: 6.4(S) Demonstrate the ability to work in school settings that focus on rural/urban context with opportunities and challenges that these opportunities provide. Understand the conditions of both rural and urban students and families. F: 7 I: 2 F: 7 I: 5 F: 2 I: 6 F: I: 9,10,11 10 F: 11 I: 3 F: 5, 11 I: 2,3 Communicate effectively with students parents and the community. F: 5,11 I: 6 Knowledge of content area reading and learning 1. Identify instructional approaches and strategies for developing and using content area vocabulary (e.g., semantic mapping, semantic feature analysis, categorization activities). 2. Identify text structures (e.g., cause and effect, chronological order, compare and contrast) and features (e.g., index, glossary, heading/subheading, lists) of fiction and nonfiction texts. 3. Identify instructional approaches and strategies for teaching study skills (e.g., note taking; summarizing; discussion; using reference materials, maps, and graphics). 4. Identify instructional approaches and strategies for teaching functional literacy skills (e.g., reading labels, signs, newspapers, schedules). 5. Apply instructional approaches and strategies for helping students comprehend content area texts (e.g., discussion, graphic organizers, metacognition, background knowledge). Florida Content Area Standards in Reading 1.1: Uses reading process effectively: Pre-reading strategies. 1.2: Uses reading process effectively: During reading strategies. 1.3: Uses reading process effectively: After reading strategies. 1.4: Constructs meaning from a wide variety of texts: Comprehension. 1.5: Constructs meaning from a wide range of texts: Reading for a variety of purposes. 4

5 1.6: Constructs meaning from formal literature background. Florida Teacher Certification Examination Competencies in Content Area Reading 6.1: Identify instructional approaches and strategies for developing and using content area vocabulary. 6.2 Identify text structures (e.g., cause and effect, chronological order, compare and contrast, and features (e.g., index, glossary, headings/ subheadings, lists) of fiction and nonfiction texts. 6.3: Identify instructional approaches and strategies for teaching study skills (e.g., note taking; summarizing; discussion; using reference materials, maps, and graphics. 6.4: Identify instructional approaches and strategies for teaching functional literacy skills (e.g., reading labels, signs, newspapers, schedules). 6.5: Apply instructional approaches and strategies for helping students comprehend content area texts (e.g., discussion, graphic organizers, metacognition, background knowledge). Florida Reading Endorsement Competencies 1 & 2 2.c. Identify explicit, systematic instructional plans for scaffolding development of comprehension skills and cognition (e.g., key questioning strategies such as reciprocal teaching, analysis of relevant details, prediction; thinking aloud strategies, sentence manipulation, paraphrasing, etc.. 2.f.4. Identify research- based guidelines and selection tools for choosing literature and expository text appropriate to students interests and independent reading proficiency. 2.f.1. Identify comprehensive instructional plans that synchronize the major reading components (e.g., lesson plans; structural analysis, Morphemic analysis, reciprocal teaching, rereading, etc.) 2.f.2. Identify explicit, systematic instructional plan for scaffolding content are vocabulary development and reading skills (e.g., morphemic analysis, semantic analysis, reciprocal teaching, writing to learn, etc.) Florida Educator Accomplished Practices AP#1. Assessment: The professional teacher continually reviews and assesses data gathered from a variety of sources. AP#2. Communication: The professional teacher constantly seeks to create a classroom that is accepting, yet business-like, on task and produces results. AP#3. Continuous Improvement: The professional teacher recognizes the need to strengthen his/her teaching through self reflection and commitment to lifelong learning. AP#4. Critical Thinking: The professional teacher uses a variety of performance assessment techniques and strategies that measure higher order thinking skills in students and provide realistic projects and problem solving activities that will enable all students to demonstrate their ability to think creatively. AP#5. Diversity: The professional teacher establishes a risk-taking environment which accepts and fosters diversity. AP#6. Ethics: The professional teacher adheres to the Code of Ethics and Principles of Professional Conduct of the Education Profession of Florida. AP#7. Human Development and Learning: The professional teacher draws upon well established human development/learning theories and concepts and a variety of information about students, 5

6 the professional teacher provides learning opportunities appropriate to student learning style, linguistic and cultural heritage, experiential background and developmental level. AP#8. Knowledge of Subject Matter: The professional teacher has a basic understanding of the subject him /her teachers and is beginning to understand that her/his subject is linked to other disciplines and can be applied in real-world integrated settings. AP#9. Learning Environments: The professional teacher understands the importance of setting up effective learning environments and begins to experiment with a variety of them, seeking to identify those which work best in a particular situation. AP#10. Planning: The professional teacher sets high expectations for all students and uses concepts from a variety of concept areas. AP#11. Role of the Teacher: The professional teacher establishes open lines of communication and works cooperatively with families, educational professionals and other members of the student s support system to promote continuous improvement of the educational experience. AP#12. Technology: The professional teacher uses technology to establish an atmosphere of active learning with existing and emerging technologies available to the school site. Cross Walk of Applicable Standards Assignments FSAC- Reading INTASC FTCE- Reading FEAPS PEU Conceptual Framework Reading Endorsement Journal Article Critique 1.1,1.2,1.3, 1.4,1.5,1.6 3(3.11,3.14,) 2,4,7,8, 4.1,4.2,5.1, f.3 Research Paper 1.1,1.2,1.3, 1.4,1.5,1.6 2,4,7,8 3.1,3.3,4.1, f.3 Completion of Chapter Study Guide 1.1,1.2,1.3, 1.4,1.5,1.6 2,3,4,8 3.1,3.3,4.1, 4.5 Lesson Plans And Simulated Teaching 1.1,1.2,1.3, 1.4,1.5,1.6 3(3.11,3.14,3.25) 6.1,6.2,6.3, 6.4,6.5 1,2,3,4,5,7, 8,9,10,11, ,5.3,5.4,5.6, 5.7,1.2, a,2.b,2.c, 2.f.4,2.f.1, 2.f.2,2.f.3 6

7 Development of Teaching Aids: KWL Charts, Reading Guides, Graphic Organizers, Venn Diagrams 1.1,1.2,1.3, 1.4,1.5,1.6 3(3.11,3.14,3.25) 6.1,6.3,6.5 5,1,4,8,9,2, 3,10,11 5.1,5.3,5.4, 5.6,5.7 2.a,2.b,2.c, 2.f.4,2.f.1, 2.f.2,2.f.3 Florida Reading Matrix RED 5336 READING MATRIX Reading Competency Indicator Code Specific Indicator Description of Activity Assessment Instrument Competency 1: Foundations in Language & Cognition Has substantive knowledge of language structure and function and cognition for each of the five major components of the reading process. 1.A.1 Specific Indicator A: Phonemic Awareness Identify and apply basic concepts of phonology as they relate to language development and reading performance (e.g., phonological process, inventory of phonemes, phonemic awareness skills, phonemic analysis)* Red and discuss chapter four, Developing Fluent Decoders and Spellers, of Classrooms that Work, by Cunningham and Allington Review the timeline of language development, identification of the progression of oral and written language. Quiz 1.A.2 Distinguish both phonological and phonemic differences in language and their applications in written and oral discourse patterns (e.g., language & dialect differences)* Analyze text selections in order to understand the use of phonology in instructional reading texts. Read and discuss Teaching reading is rocket science: What reading teachers should know and be able to do by Moats, American Federation of Teachers 7

8 Reading Competency Indicator Code Specific Indicator Description of Activity Assessment Instrument 1.B.1 Specific Indicator B: Phonics Identify structural patterns of words as they relate to reading development and reading performance (e.g., inventory of orthographic representations, syllable conventions; spellings of prefixes, root words, affixes) Distribute research study by Theodore Clymer on the Utility of Phonic Generalizations normally taught in school and go over Review each in detail, and provide examples and nonexamples for each generalization. Each student will demonstrate the generalization being covered in this lesson. Quiz 1.B.2 Apply structural analysis to words (e.g., orthographic analysis, spelling morphologies, advance phonics skills) Red and discuss chapter four, Developing Fluent Decoders and Spellers, of Classrooms that Work, by Cunningham and Allington 1.C.1 1.C.2 Specific Indicator C: Fluency Identify the principles of reading fluency as they relate to reading development Understands the role of reading fluency in development of the reading process Distribute research study by Theodore Clymer on the Utility of Phonic Generalizations normally taught in school and go over each in detail, and provide examples and non-examples for each generalization. Each student will demonstrate the generalization being covered in this lesson. Quiz 1.D.1 Specific Indicator D: Vocabulary Identify and apply principles of English morphology as they relate to language acquisition (e.g., identify meanings of morphemes, inflectional and derivational Read Chapter 5: Developing Vocabulary and concepts, and answer questions on study guide, and demonstrate the use of study strategies and reading guides. Read, critique and present your journal Study Guide Rubric 8

9 Reading Competency Indicator Code Specific Indicator Description of Activity Assessment Instrument 1.D.2 morphemes, morphemic analysis) Identify principles of semantics as they relate to vocabulary development (e.g., antonyms, synonyms, figurative language, etc.) article on teaching vocabulary, and demonstrate sample activities to teach vocabulary development. (Vacca, Vacca) Develop and implement strategies, such as the vocabulary selfconnection strategy and word maps, which encourage students to define words in context of their use. Journal Critique Rubric Professor Observation 1. E E. 2 Specific Indicator E: Comprehension Identify principles of syntactic function as they relate to language acquisition and reading development (e.g., phrase structure, types of sentences, sentence manipulations)* Understands the impact of variations in written language of different text structures on the construction of meaning Identify cognitive task levels and the role of cognitive development in the construction of meaning of a variety of texts (e.g., knowledge, comprehension, application, analysis, synthesis, evaluation) Read chapter 6: Activating Prior Knowledge and Interest in which Arousing Curiosity, Making Predictions, and Question Generation is discussed and demonstrated. Special attention will be given to developing the three level guides for the various content areas, structured overviews, advanced organizers, anticipation guides, previews, graphic organizers, etc. Read, critique and present your journal article on comprehension development. Study Guide Rubric Journal Critique Rubric 1. E E. 4 Understands the transactive nature of the reading process in constructing meaning from a wide variety of texts and for a variety of purposes (e.g., text connections: within texts, across texts, from text to 9

10 Reading Competency Indicator Code Specific Indicator Description of Activity Assessment Instrument self, from text to world) 1.F.1 1.F.2 1.F.3 1.F.4 Specific Indicator F: Integration of the major reading components Identify language characteristics related to informal language and cognitive academic language.* Identify phonemic, semantic, and syntactic variability between English and other languages.* Understands the interdependence between each of the major reading components and their effect upon fluency in the reading process (e.g., reading rate: phonological processing and construction of meaning) Understands the interdependence between each of the major reading components and their effect upon fluency in the reading process (e.g., reading rate: phonological processing and construction of meaning) Understands the interdependence between each of the major reading components and their affect upon comprehension (e.g., construction of meaning: vocabulary, fluency) Understands the impact of dialogue, writing to learn, and print environment upon reading development Read and discuss Cunningham and Allington s text: Classrooms that Work, in which What we know about classrooms that work, and How to create your own classroom that Works. Read chapters 7& 9 of Content Area Reading by Vacca and Vacca, on Engaging Students in Reading, and Working Smart: Study Strategies and Guides. Attention will be paid to: lesson and unit plans, structural analysis, morphemic analysis,reciprocal teaching, scaffolding,content area vocabulary development, and writing to learn. Read, critique, and present your journal article on using teaching strategies in your content area. Red and discuss chapter four, Developing Fluent Decoders and Spellers, of Classrooms that Work, by Cunningham and Allington Quiz Study Guide Rubric. Journal Article Rubric Study Guide Rubric 10

11 Reading Competency Indicator Code Specific Indicator Description of Activity Assessment Instrument 1.F.5 Tex Understanding reading Competency 2 Understands the principles of scientifically based reading research as the foundation of comprehensive instruction that synchronizes and scaffolds each of the major components of the reading process toward student mastery. 2.A Specific Indicator A: Phonemic Awareness Identify explicit, systematic instructional plans for scaffolding development of phonemic analysis of the sounds of words (e.g., phonemic blending, segmentation, etc.) Read Chapter 2 : From Struggling Readers to Striving Readers, answer the questions from the study guide, compare responses with your team members and participate in the whole group discussion led by your professor. (Vacca, Vacca) Study Guide Rubric 2.B Specific Indicator B: Phonics Identify explicit, systematic instructional plans for scaffolding development from emergent through advanced phonics with words from both informal and academic language (e.g., orthographic skills, phonetic and structural analysis: rules, patterns, and generalizations) Read Chapter 2 : From Struggling Readers to Striving Readers, answer the questions from the study guide, compare responses with your team members and participate in the whole group discussion led by your professor. (Vacca, Vacca) Read, critique, and present your journal article on teaching content area reading to exceptional students. Study Guide Rubric Journal Article Rubric 2.C Specific Indicator C: Fluency Identify explicit, Read Chapter 2 : From Struggling Readers to Striving Readers, answer the questions from the study guide, compare responses with your team Study Guide Rubric. 11

12 Reading Competency Indicator Code Specific Indicator Description of Activity Assessment Instrument systematic instructional plans for scaffolding fluency development and reading endurance (e.g., rereading, self-timing, independent reading material, reader s theater, etc.) members and participate in the whole group discussion led by your professor. (Vacca, Vacca) 2.D Specific Indicator D: Vocabulary Identify explicit, systematic instructional plans for scaffolding vocabulary and concept development (e.g., common morphological roots, morphemic analysis, system of word relationships, semantic mapping, semantic analysis, analogies, etc.) Read Chapter 5: Developing Vocabulary and concepts, and answer questions on study guide, and demonstrate the use of study strategies and guides. Read, critique and present your journal article on teaching vocabulary, and demonstrate sample activities to teach vocabulary development. (Vacca, Vacca) Study Guide Rubric and Teaching Aid Rubric Specific Indicator E: Comprehension 2.E Identify explicit, systematic instructional plans for scaffolding development comprehension skills and cognition (e.g., key questioning strategies such as reciprocal teaching, analysis of relevance of details, prediction, thinkaloud strategies, sentence manipulation, paraphrasing, etc.) Read chapter 6: Activating Prior Knowledge and Interest in which Arousing Curiosity, Making Predictions, and Question Generation is discussed and demonstrated. Special attention will be given to developing the three level guides for the various content areas, structured overviews, advanced organizers, anticipation guides, previews, graphic organizers, etc. Study Guide Rubric and Teaching Aid Rubric Specific Indicator F: Integration of the major reading components Identify comprehensive Read and discuss Cunningham and Allington s text: Classrooms that Work, in which What we know about Quiz 12

13 2.F.1 2.F.2 2.F.3 instructional plans that synchronize the major reading components (e.g., a lesson plan: structural analysis, morphemic analysis, reciprocal teaching, rereading, etc.) Identify explicit, systematic instructional plan for scaffolding content area vocabulary development and reading skills (e.g., morphemic analysis, semantic analysis, reciprocal teaching, writing to learn, etc.) Identify resources and research-based practices that create both languagerich and print-rich environments (e.g., large and diverse classroom libraries; questioning the author; interactive response to authentic reading and writing tasks, etc.) Identify research-based guidelines and selection tools for choosing literature and expository text appropriate to students interests and independent reading proficiency R classrooms that work, and How to create your own classroom that Works. Read chapter 7& 9 of Content Area Reading by Vacca and Vacca, on Engaging Students in Reading, and Working Smart: Study Strategies and Guides. Attention will be paid to: lesson plans, structural analysis, morphemic analysis,reciprocal teaching, scaffolding,content area vocabulary development, and reading skills. Study Guide Rubric and Teaching Aid Rubric 2.F.4 13

14 Teaching Methods Structure of the Class and the Delivery of Instruction This class will be delivered in a cooperative learning format. Everyone in the class is responsible for everyone else s learning. The Professor will serve as the instructional leader and facilitator. Much of your work in class will be done in small groups. You will be randomly assigned to a group. After three chapters have been covered, groups will be reformed. You will be given study guides before each chapter. You will be required to complete each guide outside the class. Upon arrival to class, you should immediately get into your groups and begin working. Work in the group should consist of comparing responses to the study guide, helping each other with problems that they may have had if any, making sure that each individual in the group understands each item on the study guide, deciding who will represent the group for each item during the whole group discussions. At the beginning of each class period, the professor will lead a short discussion on topics related to literacy, children, their families, schools, teachers and learning. You will be expected to take an active role in the discussions by contributing when appropriate. There are five broad topics that you will be required to prepare a critique from one of the major literacy journals. You may consult journals from the list provided earlier. The critiques should be done in the American Psychological Association format. After you detailed summary of the articles contents, provide a thoughtful personal reaction. Give your overall impressions of the article, give the strengths and weaknesses, how does this information conform with what you knew before, tell how you would use its contents, and finally, would you recommend this article to your colleagues? Nearing the end of the semester, we will begin our simulated teaching exercises. You are to plan a thirty minute lesson on a topic agreed upon by the both of us. Develop a lesson plan in the format shown on the attached sheet. You may volunteer for a scheduled time to teach your lesson. If there are no volunteers, then we proceed down the role in alphabetical order. Before beginning the lesson, read your objectives to the class, and provide any orientation to your lesson as you feel appropriate. At the end of your lesson, you will be asked to read each of your behavioral objectives to the class again, one by one. The class will be asked if the objectives were achieved. They will provide explanations of why they think the objectives were achieved or not. Next students will be asked to tell you what the strengths of the lessons were. Next they will be asked to tell you what the weaknesses were and how the lesson could have been approved. Next, the class will be asked if they would like for you to teach their child that lesson. Finally, the professor will provide an oral evaluation of the lesson. Your grade for this activity will consist of a combination of the quality of your lesson plan and the quality of your teaching presentation. CALENDAR OF ASSIGNMENTS Week One: Introductions and Orientation to Content Area Reading During this class meeting, the course syllabus will be reviewed and discussed. Additionally, the structure of the course delivery system will be described as presented above. Week Two: Reading Matters (FSAC #6,39,12) Read chapter one and respond to each of the questions on the chapter study guide outside of class. At the beginning of the next class period, get into your group for a small group discussion to work out any difficulties that any of your group members may have experienced. After each of you are confident that every group member knows and understands the content of the study guide, the whole group discussion will begin. 14

15 Chapter 1 Reading Matters Questions: 1. What strategies could a content area teacher use to effectively scaffold instruction? Provide examples of activities of teachers scaffolding instruction. 2. The text s author stated, To help students become literate in a content area does not mean to teach them how to read or write or talk as might be in case in a reading or English classroom. Instead, reading, writing, and talking are tools that learners use to comprehend texts in content areas. Discuss the meaning of this passage and the methods that you will use to insure that students do think and learn with text. 3. Describe what it means to balance content and pedagogical knowledge. What characteristics would be evident in the teaching practices of a teacher who achieved this balance? Present examples of teachers who did or did exemplify this required balance between content knowledge and pedagogical knowledge. 4. Compare and contrast the characteristics of successful and unsuccessful readers. Discuss the teacher s responsibility in the development of content area reading with both types of readers. Assignment: Participate in discussions of the above questions and present real examples of teachers who did or did not exemplify this balance of knowledge between content knowledge and pedagogical knowledge. (FSAC: 1.1,1.2,1.3,1.4,1.5,1.6); (FTCE:6.1,6.3,6.4,6.5); FEAPS: (1,2,3,4,5,7,8,9,10,11); (PEUCF:5.1,5.3,5.4,5.6,5.7); (FREC: 2.a,2.b,2.c,2.f.1,2.f.2,2.f.3); (INTASC:3.11,3.14,3.15,3.21,3.22,3.23,3.25) Week Three: *Please prepare your first journal article critique and presentation on any topic of your choice related to teaching reading in your particular content area. (FSAC: 1.1,1.2,1.3,1.4,1.5,1.6); (FTCE:6.1,6.3,6.4,6.5); FEAPS: (1,2,3,4,5,7,8,9,10,11); (PEUCF:5.1,5.3,5.4,5.6,5.7); (FREC: 2.a,2.b,2.c,2.f.1,2.f.2,2.f.3); (INTASC:3.11,3.14,3.15,3.21,3.22,3.23,3.25) Chapter 2- From Struggling Readers to Striving Readers Assignments: 1. Explain the connection between metacognition and learning. 2. Explain why learners who tend to struggle with reading often give up when faced with content literacy tasks. 3. List the elements of an effective adolescent literacy program and explain how they come together to create a balanced program. 4. Describe the challenges of using content area textbooks with students who struggle with reading and writing. Assignment: Participate in a discussion of the questions above, and write a 250 word reflection on your understanding of the challenges that confront struggling readers when they are faced with reading their content area textbooks. (FSAC: 1.1,1.2,1.3,1.4,1.5,1.6); (FTCE:6.1,6.3,6.4,6.5); FEAPS: (1,2,3,4,5,7,8,9,10,11); (PEUCF:5.1,5.3,5.4,5.6,5.7); (FREC: 2.a,2.b,2.c,2.f.1,2.f.2,2.f.3); (INTASC:3.11,3.14,3.15,3.21,3.22,3.23,3.25) 15

16 Week Four Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Learners Chapter 3 Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Learners Questions 1. Explain the framework of sheltered instruction for English learners. 2. Explain how teachers can be responsive to linguistic and cultural differences of students in their classrooms. 3. Explain the challenges English learners face when dealing with content area texts. 4. Explain how teachers can use the community and families as resources for the literacy development of their students. Assignment: Participate in a discussion of the questions above and then, develop a lesson in your particular content area that accommodates a class of culturally and linguistically diverse learners. (FSAC: 1.1,1.2,1.3,1.4,1.5,1.6); (FTCE:6.1,6.3,6.4,6.5); FEAPS: (1,2,3,4,5,7,8,9,10,11); (PEUCF:5.1,5.3,5.4,5.6,5.7); (FREC: 2.a,2.b,2.c,2.f.1,2.f.2,2.f.3); (INTASC:3.11,3.14,3.15,3.21,3.22,3.23,3.25) Week Five Chapter 4 Assessing Students and Texts *Please prepare your second journal article critique and presentation on assessing students and or reading texts in content areas. (FSAC: 1.1,1.2,1.3,1.4,1.5,1.6); (FTCE:6.1,6.3,6.4,6.5); FEAPS: (1,2,3,4,5,7,8,9,10,11); (PEUCF:5.1,5.3,5.4,5.6,5.7); (FREC: 2.a,2.b,2.c,2.f.1,2.f.2,2.f.3); (INTASC:3.11,3.14,3.15,3.21,3.22,3.23,3.25) Questions 1. How can teachers use the results of assessments to plan instruction? 2. Explain how portfolios can be used to support content area learning. 3. Explain how rubrics can be used to guide instruction and assess students work. 4. Explain how students and teachers can assess the difficulty of texts they encounter. Assignments: Participate in a discussion of the questions above and develop an assessment for a component of content area reading for your particular content area. (FSAC: 1.1,1.2,1.3,1.4,1.5,1.6); (FTCE:6.1,6.3,6.4,6.5); FEAPS: (1,2,3,4,5,7,8,9,10,11); (PEUCF:5.1,5.3,5.4,5.6,5.7); (FREC: 2.a,2.b,2.c,2.f.1,2.f.2,2.f.3); (INTASC:3.11,3.14,3.15,3.21,3.22,3.23,3.25) Week Six: Please prepare your third journal article critique and presentation on teaching vocabulary or concepts. (FSAC: 1.1,1.2,1.3,1.4,1.5,1.6); (FTCE:6.1,6.3,6.4,6.5); FEAPS: (1,2,3,4,5,7,8,9,10,11); (PEUCF:5.1,5.3,5.4,5.6,5.7); (FREC: 2.a,2.b,2.c,2.f.1,2.f.2,2.f.3); (INTASC:3.11,3.14,3.15,3.21,3.22,3.23,3.25) Chapter 5- Developing Vocabulary and Concepts 16

17 Questions 1. Explain why content area vocabulary should be taught in the context of classroom lessons. 2. Explain the relationship between experiences, concepts, and words. 3. What can teachers do to activate students prior knowledge of words? 4. Explain how strategies can be used to develop, reinforce, or extend students understanding of vocabulary. 5. Assignment: Participate in a discussion of the above questions. (FSAC: 1.1,1.2,1.3,1.4,1.5,1.6); (FTCE:6.1,6.3,6.4,6.5); FEAPS: (1,2,3,4,5,7,8,9,10,11); (PEUCF:5.1,5.3,5.4,5.6,5.7); (FREC: 2.a,2.b,2.c,2.f.1,2.f.2,2.f.3); (INTASC:3.11,3.14,3.15,3.21,3.22,3.23,3.25) Week Seven: Developing Vocabulary and Concepts Chapter 6-Activating Prior Knowledge and Interest Questions 1. Explain the importance of involving students in pre-reading activities. 2. What activities or strategies can be incorporated in motivating students to read? 3. Explain how the use of prediction strategies can have a positive influence on comprehension. 4. Explain why self-efficacy can have such a profound effect on students motivation and performance. Assignment: Participate in a discussion of the above questions, and write a reflection on your understanding of the importance of activating students prior knowledge. (FSAC: 1.1,1.2,1.3,1.4,1.5,1.6); (FTCE:6.1,6.3,6.4,6.5); FEAPS: (1,2,3,4,5,7,8,9,10,11); (PEUCF:5.1,5.3,5.4,5.6,5.7); (FREC: 2.a,2.b,2.c,2.f.1,2.f.2,2.f.3); (INTASC:3.11,3.14,3.15,3.21,3.22,3.23,3.25) Week Eight: Engaging Students in Reading Chapter Seven Study Guide Chapter 7: Engaging Students in Reading Questions 1. How should a teacher plan discussions so that students are actively engaged and responding to texts? 2. Explain how a teacher should use cooperative learning to encourage students to talk about texts. 3. Explain how the use of specific strategies can guide reader-text interactions. 4. Explain how a teacher might use one of the following strategies to support content area learning: KWL, Intra-Act, GRP, or Discussion Webs. Assignment: Participate in a discussion of the questions above and develop and demonstrate one of the teaching strategies for engaging students in reading such as : KWL Charts, GRP, Intra-Act, Discussion Webs, etc., (FSAC: 1.1,1.2,1.3,1.4,1.5,1.6); 17

18 (FTCE:6.1,6.3,6.4,6.5); FEAPS: (1,2,3,4,5,7,8,9,10,11); (PEUCF:5.1,5.3,5.4,5.6,5.7); (FREC: 2.a,2.b,2.c,2.f.1,2.f.2,2.f.3); (INTASC:3.11,3.14,3.15,3.21,3.22,3.23,3.25) Week Nine: *Prepare and present your fourth journal article critique on writing to learn, or writing across the curriculum. Chapter 8-Writing to Learn: (FEAPs#7) Questions 1. How can teachers incorporate writing to learn to support content area knowledge? 2. Why is it important to teacher reading and writing together? 3. List the stages of the writing process and explain how a teacher can support students development during each stage. 4. Explain how strategies can be used to support writing development. Assignment: Participate in a discussion of the questions above, and write a reflection on your understanding of the importance of teaching reading and writing together. (FSAC: 1.1,1.2,1.3,1.4,1.5,1.6); (FTCE:6.1,6.3,6.4,6.5); FEAPS: (1,2,3,4,5,7,8,9,10,11); (PEUCF:5.1,5.3,5.4,5.6,5.7); (FREC: 2.a,2.b,2.c,2.f.1,2.f.2,2.f.3); (INTASC:3.11,3.14,3.15,3.21,3.22,3.23,3.25) Week Ten: Engaging Students in Reading (FEAPs#5,7), (FSAC# 12.1, 12.2, 12.3) Chapter 9-Working Smart: Study Strategies and Guides Questions 1. How should a teacher use graphic organizers to support content area knowledge? 2. Explain what it means to study content material and how teachers can support students as they study. 3. Explain the different styles of note taking and how teacher should use each in a content area classroom. 4. How can an understanding of text structure influence students understanding of a text? Assignments: Participate in a discussion of the questions above. Week Eleven: Chapter 10 Bringing Students and Texts Together (FSAC#6) Questions 1. How can teachers plan instruction to ensure that students are actively engaged? 2. How can the sociocultural dynamics of a classroom impact classroom activity? 3. Explain the importance of supporting students in a BDA Instruction Framework. 18

19 4. Why is it important to incorporate research/inquiry and multiple texts into a unit of study? Participate in a discussion of the above questions, and develop an appropriate reading guide for your particular content area. (FSAC: 1.1,1.2,1.3,1.4,1.5,1.6); (FTCE:6.1,6.3,6.4,6.5); FEAPS: (1,2,3,4,5,7,8,9,10,11); (PEUCF:5.1,5.3,5.4,5.6,5.7); (FREC: 2.a,2.b,2.c,2.f.1,2.f.2,2.f.3); (INTASC:3.11,3.14,3.15,3.21,3.22,3.23,3.25) Week Twelve: Simulated Teaching Exercises in your content area (FSAC: 1.1,1.2,1.3,1.4,1.5,1.6); (FTCE:6.1,6.3,6.4,6.5); FEAPS: (1,2,3,4,5,7,8,9,10,11); (PEUCF:5.1,5.3,5.4,5.6,5.7); (FREC: 2.a,2.b,2.c,2.f.1,2.f.2,2.f.3); (INTASC:3.11,3.14,3.15,3.21,3.22,3.23,3.25) Week Thirteenth: Simulated Teaching Exercises in your content area. (FSAC: 1.1,1.2,1.3,1.4,1.5,1.6); (FTCE:6.1,6.3,6.4,6.5); FEAPS: (1,2,3,4,5,7,8,9,10,11); (PEUCF:5.1,5.3,5.4,5.6,5.7); (FREC: 2.a,2.b,2.c,2.f.1,2.f.2,2.f.3); (INTASC:3.11,3.14,3.15,3.21,3.22,3.23,3.25) Week Fourteenth: Simulated Teaching exercises in your content area. And take the final examination. (FSAC: 1.1,1.2,1.3,1.4,1.5,1.6); (FTCE:6.1,6.3,6.4,6.5); FEAPS: (1,2,3,4,5,7,8,9,10,11); (PEUCF:5.1,5.3,5.4,5.6,5.7); (FREC: 2.a,2.b,2.c,2.f.1,2.f.2,2.f.3); (INTASC:3.11,3.14,3.15,3.21,3.22,3.23,3.25) Course Evaluation How Credit Is Earned Regular Class attendance, participation in class activities and completion of chapter Study guides are required. It is expected that students who perform satisfactorily will successfully achieve the followings competencies listed below: (FSAC: 1.1,1.2,1.3,1.4,1.5,1.6); (FTCE:6.1,6.3,6.4,6.5); FEAPS: (1,2,3,4,5,7,8,9,10,11); (PEUCF:5.1,5.3,5.4,5.6,5.7); (FREC: 2.a,2.b,2.c,2.f.1,2.f.2,2.f.3); (INTASC:3.11,3.14,3.15,3.21,3.22,3.23,3.25) 20% Students are required to develop, and demonstrate the proper use of the following teaching aids: (graphic organizers, word maps, KWL Charts, Venn diagrams, three level guides, directed reading thinking-activities, discussion webs. Satisfactory performance of these instructional activities will enable the student to achieve the following competencies listed below: etc. (FSAC: 1.1,1.2,1.3,1.4,1.5,1.6); (FTCE:6.1,6.3,6.4,6.5); FEAPS: (1,2,3,4,5,7,8,9,10,11); (PEUCF:5.1,5.3,5.4,5.6,5.7); (FREC: 2.a,2.b,2.c,2.f.1,2.f.2,2.f.3); (INTASC:3.11,3.14,3.15,3.21,3.22,3.23,3.25) (FEAPs#1,2,3,4,5,8,9,10,11) 20% Students are required to read, critique, and present Journal articles on: teaching reading in content areas, developing vocabulary/ comprehension activities, develop teaching aids, and teaching the exceptional student. Satisfactory performance of these activities will enable the student to achieve the competencies below:(fsac: 1.1,1.2,1.3,1.4,1.5,1.6); (FTCE:6.1,6.3,6.4,6.5); FEAPS: (1,2,3,4,5,7,8,9,10,11); (PEUCF:5.1,5.3,5.4,5.6,5.7); (FREC: 2.a,2.b,2.c,2.f.1,2.f.2,2.f.3); (INTASC:3.11,3.14,3.15,3.21,3.22,3.23,3.25) 19

20 Students are required to develop lesson plans for their particular content area and teach it. Satisfactory performance of this activity will enable the student to achieve the following competencies listed below: (FSAC: 1.1,1.2,1.3,1.4,1.5,1.6); (FTCE:6.1,6.3,6.4,6.5); FEAPS: (1,2,3,4,5,7,8,9,10,11); (PEUCF:5.1,5.3,5.4,5.6,5.7); (FREC: 2.a,2.b,2.c,2.f.1,2.f.2,2.f.3); (INTASC:3.11,3.14,3.15,3.21,3.22,3.23,3.25) 20% Students are required to take quizzes and examinations that cover the pertinent concepts related to teaching reading in the content areas. Mastery of these concepts will ensure the achievement of the following competencies: (FSAC: 1.1,1.2,1.3,1.4,1.5,1.6); (FTCE:6.1,6.3,6.4,6.5); FEAPS: (1,2,3,4,5,7,8,9,10,11); (PEUCF:5.1,5.3,5.4,5.6,5.7); (FREC: 2.a,2.b,2.c,2.f.1,2.f.2,2.f.3); (INTASC:3.11,3.14,3.15,3.21,3.22,3.23,3.25) 20% 100% Grading How Grades Are Earned A B C D 9 & below F Course Policies Policy Statement on Non-Discrimination It is the policy of Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University to assure that each member of the University community be permitted to work or attend classes in an environment free from any form of discrimination including race, religion, color, age, disability, sex, marital status, national origin, veteran status and sexual harassment as prohibited by state and federal statutes. This shall include applicants for admission to the University and employment. Academic Honor Policy The University s Academic Honor Policy is located in the FANG Student Handbook, under the Student Code of Conduct- Regulation section, beginning on page ADA Compliance To comply with the provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), please advice instructor of accommodations required to insure participation in this course. Documentation of disability is required and should be submitted to the Learning Development and Evaluation Center (LDEC). For additional information please contact the LDEC at (850) % 20

21 RED 5336 Journal Article Critique Score/ Level Structural Organization Critique is powerfully organized and fully developed Understanding of Material Clear understanding of material displayed by clear, concrete language and complex ideas Mechanics Nearly errorfree which reflects clear understanding and thorough proofreading Critique includes logical progression of ideas aided by clear transitions Developing understanding of material Occasional grammatical errors and questionable word choice Critique includes brief skeleton (introduction, body, conclusion) but lacks transitions Limited understanding of material displayed by vague, unclear language Errors in grammar and punctuation, but spelling has been proofread Critique lacks logical progression of ideas Apparent misunderstanding of material Frequent errors in spelling, grammar, and punctuation RED 5336 Cooperative Learning Rubric Score/ Level Skill development for task Readily learns new skills as a matter of course. Seeks to extend the skill. Understanding of the process Sees opportunity in task for doing and learning. Sees value in the work. Sees teacher as colleague/mentor. Will learn skill when it is necessary. Usually minimum competence to complete task. Sees task as a school requirement to be filled, but sees some value in work. Sees teacher as evaluator and Satisfied with general understanding of skill, but will not go for competence. Sees task as burden, but is somewhat invested in process. Asks, "Do we have to?" Sees teacher as task master. Assumes others will learn skill. Makes no effort to acquire expertise in skill. Avoids teacher Sees task as burden to fill class time with no value. Sees group as free ride. 21

22 Intellectual contribution Effort Engagement Understands overall context of the task. Contributes ideas and proposals. Extends connections to ideas past and future. Volunteers for jobs no matter how difficult Always works to completion. Willing to work long hours. Enthusiastically initiates action. Personalizes the task and takes ownership of the objectives. Always knows where group is. helper. Usually understands overall context of task and asks questions about context. Makes connections on own and "gets" those others make. Willingly takes on jobs when asked. Works to completion. Will work long hours when required. Sometimes initiates action and always works well with direction. Generally knows the specific objectives and where group is. Aware of overall context, but makes no connections on own. Can recite connections of others but rarely can support them. Reluctantly does jobs when asked. Seeks easiest duties in group. Sometimes works to completion. Seeks direction, but does not initiate action. Objectives seen as poorly defined external requirements. May know where group is. Has little or no grasp of context. Sees task as isolated with no connection to past or future ideas. Actively avoids jobs when possible. Complains about others. Has large set of excuses. Waits for direction. Knows little of what is going on or objectives. Cannot describe where group is in process. 22

23 RED 5336 Teaching Aids Rubric Score/ Level Creativity/ Originality Fundamentals Applied Knowledge Displays a lot of creativity and original thought; keeps in mind task at hand but is not afraid to experiment Demonstrates mastery of line, shape, and basic elements of design. Has excellent ability to put into practice skills and theories based on discussions, readings, and observations Displays some originality or creative thought while keeping in mind the task at hand Demonstrates confidence with line, shape, and basic elements of design. Has some ability to put into practice skills and theories based on discussions, readings, and observations Expresses some originality or creative thought, but does not always meet requirements Has some difficulty demonstrating basic line, shape, and design. Has little ability to put into practice skills and theories based on discussions, readings, and observations Does not express originality or creative thought Has difficulty demonstrating basic line, shape, and design. Is unable to put into practice skills and theories based on discussions, readings, and observations RED 5336 Study Guide Completion Rubric Score/ Level Reflective Habits Builds on prior knowledge and experience. Goes over work thoughtfully to make sure solution makes sense. Responses that hit all major points and provide reflections and concrete examples receive grades of 90% or above. Student often transfers knowledge from one problem to the next. Usually looks back over work. Responses that hit all of the major points and provide reflections or concrete examples receive grades of 80 or above. Student occasionally transfers knowledge from one problem to the next. Sometimes looks back over work. Responses hit all of the major points, but provide no reflections or concrete examples, receive grades of 70 or above. Student does not carry knowledge over from one problem to the next. Does not look back over work when finished with a problem. Responses that fail to hit all of the major points receive a grade below

24 Strategies and Representations Explanation Planning Student uses multiple strategies and representations that clearly explain and enhance the solution. Explanation is clear and complete. Student evidences understanding of mathematics behind problem. Student makes a clear plan for solving problem before he/she begins. Demonstrates ability to revise plans that are not working. Student uses a clear strategy to solve the problem and an appropriate model or representation to explain or enhance the solution. Explanation is clear and complete. Alludes to underlying mathematics, but does not evidence full understanding. Student outlines a plan for problem solving, but is not able to revise plans that are not working. Student makes use of a single problem solving strategy, model, or mathematics representation. Explanation is incomplete. Alludes to underlying mathematics, but does not evidence full understanding. Student makes some cursory attempts at planning before beginning the problem. Student does not refer back to plan or make any revisions after the initial planning stage. Student does not make use of problem solving strategies, models, or mathematical representations. Explanation is unclear, confusing, and/or incomplete. No reference is made to underlying mathematics. Student does not do any planning before starting the problem. RED 5336 Research Paper Score/ Level References Sentence Structure Use of references indicate substantial research Sentence structure is varied in composition and length Use of references indicate some research Organized and complex sentence structure that has some stylistic variation Few references or some incorrect references Simplistic and/or awkward sentence structure No references or incorrect references Unclear, incorrect, and/or ineffective sentence structure Grammar Nearly error-free Few grammatical Some errors in Multiple 24

25 Vocabulary Thesis Meaningful Development of Ideas Organization of Paper Instructional Activities Objectives which reflects clear understanding and thorough proofreading Rich and precise language Establishes thesis and maintains clear purpose via suitable voice and tone Depth and complexity of thought supported by rich, pertinent details; supporting evidence leads to high-level idea development Careful and relevant organization of ideas Activities provide a logical path to meeting objectives. No activities are extraneous or irrelevant. Students of many learning styles and strengths can benefit from activities. Objectives provide a clear sense of what students will know and be able to do as a result of the and/or stylistic errors Effective language Evidence of thesis can be found and author generally maintains purpose through suitable voice and/or tone Depth of thought supported by elaborated, relevant supportive evidence provides clear vision of the idea; contains details Logical organization of ideas Activities relate to objectives. A few activities may be extraneous or irrelevant. Activities are accessible to students of more than one learning style of strength. Objectives provide some sense of what students will know and be able to do as a result of the grammar and/or format that do not interfere with clarity Simplistic and/or unclear language Attempt to create a thesis statement and communicate the purpose throughout Unelaborated ideas that are not fully explained or supported; repetitive details Somewhat unfocused and/or unclear Activities relate peripherally to objectives. Some activities are extraneous or irrelevant. Activities are not accessible to students with different learning styles and strengths. Objectives do not provide a clear sense of what students will know and be able to do as a result of the grammatical and stylistic errors Apparent confusion with the use of language There is no clear purpose of the paper; seemingly little attempt to create a thesis statement Ideas are unclear and/or not welldeveloped Weak organization of ideas Activities are unrelated to objectives. Many activities are extraneous and irrelevant. No attempt is made to individualize activities for learning styles or strengths. Objectives are missing, unclear, or are unrelated to standards. 25

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