Consolidated Financial Statements

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1 AASB Standard AASB 10 August 2011 Consolidated Financial Statements

2 Obtaining a Copy of this Accounting Standard This Standard is available on the AASB website: Alternatively, printed copies of this Standard are available for purchase by contacting: The Customer Service Officer Australian Accounting Standards Board Level Bourke Street Melbourne Victoria AUSTRALIA Postal address: PO Box 204 Collins Street West Victoria 8007 AUSTRALIA Phone: (03) Fax: (03) Website: Other Enquiries Phone: (03) Fax: (03) COPYRIGHT Commonwealth of Australia 2011 This AASB Standard contains IFRS Foundation copyright material. Reproduction within Australia in unaltered form (retaining this notice) is permitted for personal and non-commercial use subject to the inclusion of an acknowledgment of the source. Requests and enquiries concerning reproduction and rights for commercial purposes within Australia should be addressed to The Director of Finance and Administration, Australian Accounting Standards Board, PO Box 204, Collins Street West, Victoria All existing rights in this material are reserved outside Australia. Reproduction outside Australia in unaltered form (retaining this notice) is permitted for personal and non-commercial use only. Further information and requests for authorisation to reproduce for commercial purposes outside Australia should be addressed to the IFRS Foundation at ISSN AASB 10 2 COPYRIGHT

3 CONTENTS PREFACE COMPARISON WITH IFRS 10 INTRODUCTION TO IFRS 10 (available on the AASB website) ACCOUNTING STANDARD AASB 10 CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Paragraphs Objective 1 Meeting the objective 2 3 Application Aus3.1 Aus3.5 Scope 4 Aus4.2 Control 5 9 Power Returns Link between power and returns Accounting requirements Non-controlling interests Loss of control Appendices: A. Defined Terms Page 15 B. Application Guidance B1 Assessing control B2 B4 Purpose and design of an investee B5 B8 Power B9 B54 Exposure, or rights, to variable returns from an investee B55 B57 Link between power and returns B58 B72 Relationship with other parties B73 B75 Control of specified assets B76 B79 Continuous assessment B80 B85 Accounting requirements Consolidation procedures B86 AASB 10 3 CONTENTS

4 Uniform accounting policies Measurement Potential voting rights Reporting date Non-controlling interests Loss of control C. Effective Date and Transition Transition References to AASB 9 B87 B88 B89 B91 B92 B93 B94 B96 B97 B99 C2 C6 C7 AUSTRALIAN APPLICATION GUIDANCE Page 58 DELETED IFRS 10 TEXT Page 59 BASIS FOR CONCLUSIONS ON PARAGRAPH Aus4.1 (see Basis for Conclusions on AASB ) BASIS FOR CONCLUSIONS ON IFRS 10 (available on the AASB website) Australian Accounting Standard AASB 10 Consolidated Financial Statements is set out in paragraphs 1 26 and Appendices A C. All the paragraphs have equal authority. Paragraphs in bold type state the main principles. Terms defined in Appendix A are in italics the first time they appear in the Standard. AASB 10 is to be read in the context of other Australian Accounting Standards, including AASB 1048 Interpretation of Standards, which identifies the Australian Accounting Interpretations. In the absence of explicit guidance, AASB 108 Accounting Policies, Changes in Accounting Estimates and Errors provides a basis for selecting and applying accounting policies. AASB 10 4 CONTENTS

5 Introduction PREFACE The Australian Accounting Standards Board (AASB) makes Australian Accounting Standards, including Interpretations, to be applied by: (a) (c) entities required by the Corporations Act 2001 to prepare financial reports; governments in preparing financial statements for the whole of government and the General Government Sector (GGS); and entities in the private or public for-profit or not-for-profit sectors that are reporting entities or that prepare general purpose financial statements. AASB 1053 Application of Tiers of Australian Accounting Standards establishes a differential reporting framework consisting of two tiers of reporting requirements for preparing general purpose financial statements: (a) Tier 1: Australian Accounting Standards; and Tier 2: Australian Accounting Standards Reduced Disclosure Requirements. Tier 1 requirements incorporate International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRSs), including Interpretations, issued by the International Accounting Standards Board (IASB), with the addition of paragraphs on the applicability of each Standard in the Australian environment. Publicly accountable for-profit private sector entities are required to adopt Tier 1 requirements, and therefore are required to comply with IFRSs. Furthermore, other for-profit private sector entities complying with Tier 1 requirements will simultaneously comply with IFRSs. Some other entities complying with Tier 1 requirements will also simultaneously comply with IFRSs. Tier 2 requirements comprise the recognition, measurement and presentation requirements of Tier 1 but substantially reduced disclosure requirements in comparison to Tier 1. Australian Accounting Standards also include requirements that are specific to Australian entities. These requirements may be located in Australian Accounting Standards that incorporate IFRSs or in other Australian Accounting Standards. In most instances, these requirements are either AASB 10 5 PREFACE

6 restricted to the not-for-profit or public sectors or include additional disclosures that address domestic, regulatory or other issues. These requirements do not prevent publicly accountable for-profit private sector entities from complying with IFRSs. In developing requirements for public sector entities, the AASB considers the requirements of International Public Sector Accounting Standards (IPSASs), as issued by the International Public Sector Accounting Standards Board (IPSASB) of the International Federation of Accountants. Differences between this Standard and superseded requirements under AASB 127 and Interpretation 112 Differences between this Standard and the superseded requirements under AASB 127 Consolidated and Separate Financial Statements and Interpretation 112 Consolidation Special Purpose Entities are the same as the differences between IFRS 10 Consolidated Financial Statements and the superseded requirements under IAS 27 Consolidated and Separate Financial Statements and Interpretation SIC-12 Consolidation Special Purpose Entities. The main differences are summarised in the project summary and feedback statement in relation to IFRS 10 and IFRS 12 Disclosure of Interests in Other Entities, which is available on the IASB s website at Implications for not-for-profit entities This Standard applies to both for-profit and not-for-profit entities. However, prior to the 1 January 2013 mandatory application date of this Standard, the AASB will consider whether this Standard should be modified for application by not-for-profit entities having regard to its Process for Modifying IFRSs for PBE/NFP. In light of this, not-for-profit entities are not permitted to apply this Standard prior to the mandatory application date. AASB 10 6 PREFACE

7 COMPARISON WITH IFRS 10 AASB 10 Consolidated Financial Statements incorporates IFRS 10 Consolidated Financial Statements issued by the International Accounting Standards Board (IASB). Paragraphs that have been added to this Standard (and do not appear in the text of IFRS 10) are identified with the prefix Aus, followed by the number of the preceding IASB paragraph and decimal numbering. For-profit entities that comply with AASB 10 will simultaneously be in compliance with IFRS 10. Not-for-profit entities using the added Aus paragraphs in the Standard that specifically apply to not-for-profit entities may not be simultaneously complying with IFRS 10. AASB 10 7 COMPARISON

8 ACCOUNTING STANDARD AASB 10 The Australian Accounting Standards Board makes Accounting Standard AASB 10 Consolidated Financial Statements under section 334 of the Corporations Act Dated 29 August 2011 Kevin M. Stevenson Chair AASB ACCOUNTING STANDARD AASB 10 CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Objective 1 The objective of this Standard is to establish principles for the presentation and preparation of consolidated financial statements when an entity controls one or more other entities. Meeting the objective 2 To meet the objective in paragraph 1, this Standard: (a) (c) (d) requires an entity (the parent) that controls one or more other entities (subsidiaries) to present consolidated financial statements; defines the principle of control, and establishes control as the basis for consolidation; sets out how to apply the principle of control to identify whether an investor controls an investee and therefore must consolidate the investee; and sets out the accounting requirements for the preparation of consolidated financial statements. 3 This Standard does not deal with the accounting requirements for business combinations and their effect on consolidation, including goodwill arising on a business combination (see AASB 3 Business Combinations). AASB 10 8 STANDARD

9 Application Aus3.1 This Standard applies to: (a) (c) each entity that is required to prepare financial reports in accordance with Part 2M.3 of the Corporations Act and that is a reporting entity; general purpose financial statements of each other reporting entity; and financial statements that are, or are held out to be, general purpose financial statements. Aus3.2 Aus3.3 Aus3.4 Aus3.5 This Standard applies to annual reporting periods beginning on or after 1 January This Standard may be applied by for-profit entities, but not by not-for-profit entities, to annual reporting periods beginning on or after 1 January 2005 but before 1 January If a for-profit entity applies this Standard to such an annual reporting period, it shall disclose that fact and apply AASB 11 Joint Arrangements, AASB 12 Disclosure of Interests in Other Entities, AASB 127 Separate Financial Statements (August 2011) and AASB 128 Investments in Associates and Joint Ventures (August 2011), at the same time. The requirements specified in this Standard apply to the financial statements where information resulting from their application is material in accordance with AASB 1031 Materiality. When applied or operative, this Standard supersedes: Scope (a) the requirements relating to consolidated financial statements in AASB 127 Consolidated and Separate Financial Statements (March 2008, as amended); and Interpretation 112 Consolidation Special Purpose Entities (December 2004, as amended). 4 An entity that is a parent shall present consolidated financial statements. This Standard applies to all entities, except as follows: AASB 10 9 STANDARD

10 (a) a parent need not present consolidated financial statements if it meets all the following conditions: (i) (ii) (iii) (iv) it is a wholly-owned subsidiary or is a partially-owned subsidiary of another entity and all its other owners, including those not otherwise entitled to vote, have been informed about, and do not object to, the parent not presenting consolidated financial statements; its debt or equity instruments are not traded in a public market (a domestic or foreign stock exchange or an overthe-counter market, including local and regional markets); it did not file, nor is it in the process of filing, its financial statements with a securities commission or other regulatory organisation for the purpose of issuing any class of instruments in a public market; and its ultimate or any intermediate parent produces consolidated financial statements that are available for public use and comply with International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRSs). Aus4.1 post-employment benefit plans or other long-term employee benefit plans to which AASB 119 Employee Benefits applies. Notwithstanding paragraph 4(a)(iv), a parent that meets the criteria in paragraphs 4(a)(i), 4(a)(ii) and 4(a)(iii) need not present consolidated financial statements if its ultimate or any intermediate parent produces consolidated financial statements available for public use and the parent and its ultimate or intermediate parent are both not-for-profit entities complying with Australian Accounting Standards. Aus4.2 Control Notwithstanding paragraphs 4 and Aus4.1, the ultimate Australian parent shall present consolidated financial statements that consolidate its investments in subsidiaries in accordance with this Standard when either the parent or the group is a reporting entity or both the parent and the group are reporting entities. 5 An investor, regardless of the nature of its involvement with an entity (the investee), shall determine whether it is a parent by assessing whether it controls the investee. AASB STANDARD

11 6 An investor controls an investee when it is exposed, or has rights, to variable returns from its involvement with the investee and has the ability to affect those returns through its power over the investee. 7 Thus, an investor controls an investee if and only if the investor has all the following: (a) power over the investee (see paragraphs 10 14); (c) exposure, or rights, to variable returns from its involvement with the investee (see paragraphs 15 and 16); and the ability to use its power over the investee to affect the amount of the investor s returns (see paragraphs 17 and 18). 8 An investor shall consider all facts and circumstances when assessing whether it controls an investee. The investor shall reassess whether it controls an investee if facts and circumstances indicate that there are changes to one or more of the three elements of control listed in paragraph 7 (see paragraphs B80 B85). 9 Two or more investors collectively control an investee when they must act together to direct the relevant activities. In such cases, because no investor can direct the activities without the co-operation of the others, no investor individually controls the investee. Each investor would account for its interest in the investee in accordance with the relevant Standards, such as AASB 11 Joint Arrangements, AASB 128 Investments in Associates and Joint Ventures or AASB 9 Financial Instruments. Power 10 An investor has power over an investee when the investor has existing rights that give it the current ability to direct the relevant activities, ie the activities that significantly affect the investee s returns. 11 Power arises from rights. Sometimes assessing power is straightforward, such as when power over an investee is obtained directly and solely from the voting rights granted by equity instruments such as shares, and can be assessed by considering the voting rights from those shareholdings. In other cases, the assessment will be more complex and require more than one factor to be considered, for example when power results from one or more contractual arrangements. AASB STANDARD

12 12 An investor with the current ability to direct the relevant activities has power even if its rights to direct have yet to be exercised. Evidence that the investor has been directing relevant activities can help determine whether the investor has power, but such evidence is not, in itself, conclusive in determining whether the investor has power over an investee. 13 If two or more investors each have existing rights that give them the unilateral ability to direct different relevant activities, the investor that has the current ability to direct the activities that most significantly affect the returns of the investee has power over the investee. 14 An investor can have power over an investee even if other entities have existing rights that give them the current ability to participate in the direction of the relevant activities, for example when another entity has significant influence. However, an investor that holds only protective rights does not have power over an investee (see paragraphs B26 B28), and consequently does not control the investee. Returns 15 An investor is exposed, or has rights, to variable returns from its involvement with the investee when the investor s returns from its involvement have the potential to vary as a result of the investee s performance. The investor s returns can be only positive, only negative or both positive and negative. 16 Although only one investor can control an investee, more than one party can share in the returns of an investee. For example, holders of non-controlling interests can share in the profits or distributions of an investee. Link between power and returns 17 An investor controls an investee if the investor not only has power over the investee and exposure or rights to variable returns from its involvement with the investee, but also has the ability to use its power to affect the investor s returns from its involvement with the investee. 18 Thus, an investor with decision-making rights shall determine whether it is a principal or an agent. An investor that is an agent in accordance with paragraphs B58 B72 does not control an investee when it exercises decision-making rights delegated to it. AASB STANDARD

13 Accounting requirements 19 A parent shall prepare consolidated financial statements using uniform accounting policies for like transactions and other events in similar circumstances. 20 Consolidation of an investee shall begin from the date the investor obtains control of the investee and cease when the investor loses control of the investee. 21 Paragraphs B86 B93 set out guidance for the preparation of consolidated financial statements. Non-controlling interests 22 A parent shall present non-controlling interests in the consolidated statement of financial position within equity, separately from the equity of the owners of the parent. 23 Changes in a parent s ownership interest in a subsidiary that do not result in the parent losing control of the subsidiary are equity transactions (ie transactions with owners in their capacity as owners). 24 Paragraphs B94 B96 set out guidance for the accounting for noncontrolling interests in consolidated financial statements. Loss of control 25 If a parent loses control of a subsidiary, the parent: (a) (c) derecognises the assets and liabilities of the former subsidiary from the consolidated statement of financial position. recognises any investment retained in the former subsidiary at its fair value when control is lost and subsequently accounts for it and for any amounts owed by or to the former subsidiary in accordance with relevant Standards. That fair value shall be regarded as the fair value on initial recognition of a financial asset in accordance with AASB 9 or, when appropriate, the cost on initial recognition of an investment in an associate or joint venture. recognises the gain or loss associated with the loss of control attributable to the former controlling interest. AASB STANDARD

14 26 Paragraphs B97 B99 set out guidance for the accounting for the loss of control. AASB STANDARD

15 APPENDIX A DEFINED TERMS This appendix is an integral part of AASB 10. consolidated financial statements The financial statements of a group in which the assets, liabilities, equity, income, expenses and cash flows of the parent and its subsidiaries are presented as those of a single economic entity. control of an investee An investor controls an investee when the investor is exposed, or has rights, to variable returns from its involvement with the investee and has the ability to affect those returns through its power over the investee. decision maker group non-controlling interest parent power protective rights relevant activities An entity with decision-making rights that is either a principal or an agent for other parties. A parent and its subsidiaries. Equity in a subsidiary not attributable, directly or indirectly, to a parent. An entity that controls one or more entities. Existing rights that give the current ability to direct the relevant activities. Rights designed to protect the interest of the party holding those rights without giving that party power over the entity to which those rights relate. For the purpose of this Standard, relevant activities are activities of the investee that significantly affect the investee s returns. AASB APPENDIX A

16 removal rights subsidiary Rights to deprive the decision maker of its decisionmaking authority. An entity that is controlled by another entity. The following terms are defined in AASB 11, AASB 12 Disclosure of Interests in Other Entities, AASB 128 (August 2011) or AASB 124 Related Party Disclosures and are used in this Standard with the meanings specified in those Standards: associate interest in another entity joint venture key management personnel related party significant influence. AASB APPENDIX A

17 APPENDIX B APPLICATION GUIDANCE This appendix is an integral part of AASB 10. It describes the application of paragraphs 1 26 and has the same authority as the other parts of the Standard. B1 The examples in this appendix portray hypothetical situations. Although some aspects of the examples may be present in actual fact patterns, all facts and circumstances of a particular fact pattern would need to be evaluated when applying AASB 10. Assessing control B2 To determine whether it controls an investee an investor shall assess whether it has all the following: (a) (c) power over the investee; exposure, or rights, to variable returns from its involvement with the investee; and the ability to use its power over the investee to affect the amount of the investor s returns. B3 Consideration of the following factors may assist in making that determination: (a) (c) (d) (e) the purpose and design of the investee (see paragraphs B5 B8); what the relevant activities are and how decisions about those activities are made (see paragraphs B11 B13); whether the rights of the investor give it the current ability to direct the relevant activities (see paragraphs B14 B54); whether the investor is exposed, or has rights, to variable returns from its involvement with the investee (see paragraphs B55 B57); and whether the investor has the ability to use its power over the investee to affect the amount of the investor s returns (see paragraphs B58 B72). AASB APPENDIX B

18 B4 When assessing control of an investee, an investor shall consider the nature of its relationship with other parties (see paragraphs B73 B75). Purpose and design of an investee B5 B6 B7 When assessing control of an investee, an investor shall consider the purpose and design of the investee in order to identify the relevant activities, how decisions about the relevant activities are made, who has the current ability to direct those activities and who receives returns from those activities. When an investee s purpose and design are considered, it may be clear that an investee is controlled by means of equity instruments that give the holder proportionate voting rights, such as ordinary shares in the investee. In this case, in the absence of any additional arrangements that alter decision-making, the assessment of control focuses on which party, if any, is able to exercise voting rights sufficient to determine the investee s operating and financing policies (see paragraphs B34 B50). In the most straightforward case, the investor that holds a majority of those voting rights, in the absence of any other factors, controls the investee. To determine whether an investor controls an investee in more complex cases, it may be necessary to consider some or all of the other factors in paragraph B3. B8 Power An investee may be designed so that voting rights are not the dominant factor in deciding who controls the investee, such as when any voting rights relate to administrative tasks only and the relevant activities are directed by means of contractual arrangements. In such cases, an investor s consideration of the purpose and design of the investee shall also include consideration of the risks to which the investee was designed to be exposed, the risks it was designed to pass on to the parties involved with the investee and whether the investor is exposed to some or all of those risks. Consideration of the risks includes not only the downside risk, but also the potential for upside. B9 To have power over an investee, an investor must have existing rights that give it the current ability to direct the relevant activities. For the purpose of assessing power, only substantive rights and rights that are not protective shall be considered (see paragraphs B22 B28). B10 The determination about whether an investor has power depends on the relevant activities, the way decisions about the relevant activities are AASB APPENDIX B

19 made and the rights the investor and other parties have in relation to the investee. Relevant activities and direction of relevant activities B11 For many investees, a range of operating and financing activities significantly affect their returns. Examples of activities that, depending on the circumstances, can be relevant activities include, but are not limited to: (a) (c) (d) (e) selling and purchasing of goods or services; managing financial assets during their life (including upon default); selecting, acquiring or disposing of assets; researching and developing new products or processes; and determining a funding structure or obtaining funding. B12 Examples of decisions about relevant activities include but are not limited to: (a) establishing operating and capital decisions of the investee, including budgets; and appointing and remunerating an investee s key management personnel or service providers and terminating their services or employment. B13 In some situations, activities both before and after a particular set of circumstances arises or event occurs may be relevant activities. When two or more investors have the current ability to direct relevant activities and those activities occur at different times, the investors shall determine which investor is able to direct the activities that most significantly affect those returns consistently with the treatment of concurrent decision-making rights (see paragraph 13). The investors shall reconsider this assessment over time if relevant facts or circumstances change. AASB APPENDIX B

20 Application examples Example 1 Two investors form an investee to develop and market a medical product. One investor is responsible for developing and obtaining regulatory approval of the medical product that responsibility includes having the unilateral ability to make all decisions relating to the development of the product and to obtaining regulatory approval. Once the regulator has approved the product, the other investor will manufacture and market it this investor has the unilateral ability to make all decisions about the manufacture and marketing of the project. If all the activities developing and obtaining regulatory approval as well as manufacturing and marketing of the medical product are relevant activities, each investor needs to determine whether it is able to direct the activities that most significantly affect the investee s returns. Accordingly, each investor needs to consider whether developing and obtaining regulatory approval or the manufacturing and marketing of the medical product is the activity that most significantly affects the investee s returns and whether it is able to direct that activity. In determining which investor has power, the investors would consider: (a) the purpose and design of the investee; the factors that determine the profit margin, revenue and value of the investee as well as the value of the medical product; (c) the effect on the investee s returns resulting from each investor s decision-making authority with respect to the factors in ; and (d) the investors exposure to variability of returns. In this particular example, the investors would also consider: (e) the uncertainty of, and effort required in, obtaining regulatory approval (considering the investor s record of successfully developing and obtaining regulatory approval of medical products); and (f) which investor controls the medical product once the development phase is successful. AASB APPENDIX B

21 Example 2 An investment vehicle (the investee) is created and financed with a debt instrument held by an investor (the debt investor) and equity instruments held by a number of other investors. The equity tranche is designed to absorb the first losses and to receive any residual return from the investee. One of the equity investors who holds 30 per cent of the equity is also the asset manager. The investee uses its proceeds to purchase a portfolio of financial assets, exposing the investee to the credit risk associated with the possible default of principal and interest payments of the assets. The transaction is marketed to the debt investor as an investment with minimal exposure to the credit risk associated with the possible default of the assets in the portfolio because of the nature of these assets and because the equity tranche is designed to absorb the first losses of the investee. The returns of the investee are significantly affected by the management of the investee s asset portfolio, which includes decisions about the selection, acquisition and disposal of the assets within portfolio guidelines and the management upon default of any portfolio assets. All those activities are managed by the asset manager until defaults reach a specified proportion of the portfolio value (ie when the value of the portfolio is such that the equity tranche of the investee has been consumed). From that time, a third-party trustee manages the assets according to the instructions of the debt investor. Managing the investee s asset portfolio is the relevant activity of the investee. The asset manager has the ability to direct the relevant activities until defaulted assets reach the specified proportion of the portfolio value; the debt investor has the ability to direct the relevant activities when the value of defaulted assets surpasses that specified proportion of the portfolio value. The asset manager and the debt investor each need to determine whether they are able to direct the activities that most significantly affect the investee s returns, including considering the purpose and design of the investee as well as each party s exposure to variability of returns. Rights that give an investor power over an investee B14 Power arises from rights. To have power over an investee, an investor must have existing rights that give the investor the current ability to direct the relevant activities. The rights that may give an investor power can differ between investees. B15 Examples of rights that, either individually or in combination, can give an investor power include but are not limited to: AASB APPENDIX B

22 (a) (c) (d) (e) rights in the form of voting rights (or potential voting rights) of an investee (see paragraphs B34 B50); rights to appoint, reassign or remove members of an investee s key management personnel who have the ability to direct the relevant activities; rights to appoint or remove another entity that directs the relevant activities; rights to direct the investee to enter into, or veto any changes to, transactions for the benefit of the investor; and other rights (such as decision-making rights specified in a management contract) that give the holder the ability to direct the relevant activities. B16 Generally, when an investee has a range of operating and financing activities that significantly affect the investee s returns and when substantive decision-making with respect to these activities is required continuously, it will be voting or similar rights that give an investor power, either individually or in combination with other arrangements. B17 When voting rights cannot have a significant effect on an investee s returns, such as when voting rights relate to administrative tasks only and contractual arrangements determine the direction of the relevant activities, the investor needs to assess those contractual arrangements in order to determine whether it has rights sufficient to give it power over the investee. To determine whether an investor has rights sufficient to give it power, the investor shall consider the purpose and design of the investee (see paragraphs B5 B8) and the requirements in paragraphs B51 B54 together with paragraphs B18 B20. B18 In some circumstances it may be difficult to determine whether an investor s rights are sufficient to give it power over an investee. In such cases, to enable the assessment of power to be made, the investor shall consider evidence of whether it has the practical ability to direct the relevant activities unilaterally. Consideration is given, but is not limited, to the following, which, when considered together with its rights and the indicators in paragraphs B19 and B20, may provide evidence that the investor s rights are sufficient to give it power over the investee: (a) The investor can, without having the contractual right to do so, appoint or approve the investee s key management personnel who have the ability to direct the relevant activities. AASB APPENDIX B

23 (c) (d) (e) The investor can, without having the contractual right to do so, direct the investee to enter into, or can veto any changes to, significant transactions for the benefit of the investor. The investor can dominate either the nominations process for electing members of the investee s governing body or the obtaining of proxies from other holders of voting rights. The investee s key management personnel are related parties of the investor (for example, the chief executive officer of the investee and the chief executive officer of the investor are the same person). The majority of the members of the investee s governing body are related parties of the investor. B19 Sometimes there will be indications that the investor has a special relationship with the investee, which suggests that the investor has more than a passive interest in the investee. The existence of any individual indicator, or a particular combination of indicators, does not necessarily mean that the power criterion is met. However, having more than a passive interest in the investee may indicate that the investor has other related rights sufficient to give it power or provide evidence of existing power over an investee. For example, the following suggests that the investor has more than a passive interest in the investee and, in combination with other rights, may indicate power: (a) The investee s key management personnel who have the ability to direct the relevant activities are current or previous employees of the investor. The investee s operations are dependent on the investor, such as in the following situations: (i) (ii) (iii) (iv) The investee depends on the investor to fund a significant portion of its operations. The investor guarantees a significant portion of the investee s obligations. The investee depends on the investor for critical services, technology, supplies or raw materials. The investor controls assets such as licences or trademarks that are critical to the investee s operations. AASB APPENDIX B

24 (v) The investee depends on the investor for key management personnel, such as when the investor s personnel have specialised knowledge of the investee s operations. (c) (d) A significant portion of the investee s activities either involve or are conducted on behalf of the investor. The investor s exposure, or rights, to returns from its involvement with the investee is disproportionately greater than its voting or other similar rights. For example, there may be a situation in which an investor is entitled, or exposed, to more than half of the returns of the investee but holds less than half of the voting rights of the investee. B20 The greater an investor s exposure, or rights, to variability of returns from its involvement with an investee, the greater is the incentive for the investor to obtain rights sufficient to give it power. Therefore, having a large exposure to variability of returns is an indicator that the investor may have power. However, the extent of the investor s exposure does not, in itself, determine whether an investor has power over the investee. B21 When the factors set out in paragraph B18 and the indicators set out in paragraphs B19 and B20 are considered together with an investor s rights, greater weight shall be given to the evidence of power described in paragraph B18. Substantive rights B22 An investor, in assessing whether it has power, considers only substantive rights relating to an investee (held by the investor and others). For a right to be substantive, the holder must have the practical ability to exercise that right. B23 Determining whether rights are substantive requires judgement, taking into account all facts and circumstances. Factors to consider in making that determination include but are not limited to: (a) Whether there are any barriers (economic or otherwise) that prevent the holder (or holders) from exercising the rights. Examples of such barriers include but are not limited to: (i) financial penalties and incentives that would prevent (or deter) the holder from exercising its rights. AASB APPENDIX B

25 (ii) (iii) (iv) (v) (vi) an exercise or conversion price that creates a financial barrier that would prevent (or deter) the holder from exercising its rights. terms and conditions that make it unlikely that the rights would be exercised, for example, conditions that narrowly limit the timing of their exercise. the absence of an explicit, reasonable mechanism in the founding documents of an investee or in applicable laws or regulations that would allow the holder to exercise its rights. the inability of the holder of the rights to obtain the information necessary to exercise its rights. operational barriers or incentives that would prevent (or deter) the holder from exercising its rights (eg the absence of other managers willing or able to provide specialised services or provide the services and take on other interests held by the incumbent manager). (vii) legal or regulatory requirements that prevent the holder from exercising its rights (eg where a foreign investor is prohibited from exercising its rights). (c) When the exercise of rights requires the agreement of more than one party, or when the rights are held by more than one party, whether a mechanism is in place that provides those parties with the practical ability to exercise their rights collectively if they choose to do so. The lack of such a mechanism is an indicator that the rights may not be substantive. The more parties that are required to agree to exercise the rights, the less likely it is that those rights are substantive. However, a board of directors whose members are independent of the decision maker may serve as a mechanism for numerous investors to act collectively in exercising their rights. Therefore, removal rights exercisable by an independent board of directors are more likely to be substantive than if the same rights were exercisable individually by a large number of investors. Whether the party or parties that hold the rights would benefit from the exercise of those rights. For example, the holder of potential voting rights in an investee (see paragraphs B47 B50) shall consider the exercise or conversion price of the instrument. The terms and conditions of potential voting rights are more likely to be substantive when the instrument is in the money or AASB APPENDIX B

26 the investor would benefit for other reasons (eg by realising synergies between the investor and the investee) from the exercise or conversion of the instrument. B24 To be substantive, rights also need to be exercisable when decisions about the direction of the relevant activities need to be made. Usually, to be substantive, the rights need to be currently exercisable. However, sometimes rights can be substantive, even though the rights are not currently exercisable. Application examples Example 3 The investee has annual shareholder meetings at which decisions to direct the relevant activities are made. The next scheduled shareholders meeting is in eight months. However, shareholders that individually or collectively hold at least 5 per cent of the voting rights can call a special meeting to change the existing policies over the relevant activities, but a requirement to give notice to the other shareholders means that such a meeting cannot be held for at least 30 days. Policies over the relevant activities can be changed only at special or scheduled shareholders meetings. This includes the approval of material sales of assets as well as the making or disposing of significant investments. The above fact pattern applies to examples 3A 3D described below. Each example is considered in isolation. Example 3A An investor holds a majority of the voting rights in the investee. The investor s voting rights are substantive because the investor is able to make decisions about the direction of the relevant activities when they need to be made. The fact that it takes 30 days before the investor can exercise its voting rights does not stop the investor from having the current ability to direct the relevant activities from the moment the investor acquires the shareholding. Example 3B An investor is party to a forward contract to acquire the majority of shares in the investee. The forward contract s settlement date is in 25 days. The existing shareholders are unable to change the existing policies over the relevant activities because a special meeting cannot be held for at least 30 days, at which point the forward contract will have been settled. Thus, the investor has AASB APPENDIX B

27 rights that are essentially equivalent to the majority shareholder in example 3A above (ie the investor holding the forward contract can make decisions about the direction of the relevant activities when they need to be made). The investor s forward contract is a substantive right that gives the investor the current ability to direct the relevant activities even before the forward contract is settled. Example 3C An investor holds a substantive option to acquire the majority of shares in the investee that is exercisable in 25 days and is deeply in the money. The same conclusion would be reached as in example 3B. Example 3D An investor is party to a forward contract to acquire the majority of shares in the investee, with no other related rights over the investee. The forward contract s settlement date is in six months. In contrast to the examples above, the investor does not have the current ability to direct the relevant activities. The existing shareholders have the current ability to direct the relevant activities because they can change the existing policies over the relevant activities before the forward contract is settled. B25 Substantive rights exercisable by other parties can prevent an investor from controlling the investee to which those rights relate. Such substantive rights do not require the holders to have the ability to initiate decisions. As long as the rights are not merely protective (see paragraphs B26 B28), substantive rights held by other parties may prevent the investor from controlling the investee even if the rights give the holders only the current ability to approve or block decisions that relate to the relevant activities. Protective rights B26 In evaluating whether rights give an investor power over an investee, the investor shall assess whether its rights, and rights held by others, are protective rights. Protective rights relate to fundamental changes to the activities of an investee or apply in exceptional circumstances. However, not all rights that apply in exceptional circumstances or are contingent on events are protective (see paragraphs B13 and B53). B27 Because protective rights are designed to protect the interests of their holder without giving that party power over the investee to which those rights relate, an investor that holds only protective rights cannot have AASB APPENDIX B

28 power or prevent another party from having power over an investee (see paragraph 14). B28 Examples of protective rights include but are not limited to: (a) (c) a lender s right to restrict a borrower from undertaking activities that could significantly change the credit risk of the borrower to the detriment of the lender. the right of a party holding a non-controlling interest in an investee to approve capital expenditure greater than that required in the ordinary course of business, or to approve the issue of equity or debt instruments. the right of a lender to seize the assets of a borrower if the borrower fails to meet specified loan repayment conditions. Franchises B29 A franchise agreement for which the investee is the franchisee often gives the franchisor rights that are designed to protect the franchise brand. Franchise agreements typically give franchisors some decisionmaking rights with respect to the operations of the franchisee. B30 Generally, franchisors rights do not restrict the ability of parties other than the franchisor to make decisions that have a significant effect on the franchisee s returns. Nor do the rights of the franchisor in franchise agreements necessarily give the franchisor the current ability to direct the activities that significantly affect the franchisee s returns. B31 It is necessary to distinguish between having the current ability to make decisions that significantly affect the franchisee s returns and having the ability to make decisions that protect the franchise brand. The franchisor does not have power over the franchisee if other parties have existing rights that give them the current ability to direct the relevant activities of the franchisee. B32 By entering into the franchise agreement the franchisee has made a unilateral decision to operate its business in accordance with the terms of the franchise agreement, but for its own account. B33 Control over such fundamental decisions as the legal form of the franchisee and its funding structure may be determined by parties other than the franchisor and may significantly affect the returns of the franchisee. The lower the level of financial support provided by the franchisor and the lower the franchisor s exposure to variability of AASB APPENDIX B

29 returns from the franchisee the more likely it is that the franchisor has only protective rights. Voting rights B34 Often an investor has the current ability, through voting or similar rights, to direct the relevant activities. An investor considers the requirements in this section (paragraphs B35 B50) if the relevant activities of an investee are directed through voting rights. Power with a majority of the voting rights B35 An investor that holds more than half of the voting rights of an investee has power in the following situations, unless paragraph B36 or paragraph B37 applies: (a) the relevant activities are directed by a vote of the holder of the majority of the voting rights, or a majority of the members of the governing body that directs the relevant activities are appointed by a vote of the holder of the majority of the voting rights. Majority of the voting rights but no power B36 For an investor that holds more than half of the voting rights of an investee, to have power over an investee, the investor s voting rights must be substantive, in accordance with paragraphs B22 B25, and must provide the investor with the current ability to direct the relevant activities, which often will be through determining operating and financing policies. If another entity has existing rights that provide that entity with the right to direct the relevant activities and that entity is not an agent of the investor, the investor does not have power over the investee. B37 An investor does not have power over an investee, even though the investor holds the majority of the voting rights in the investee, when those voting rights are not substantive. For example, an investor that has more than half of the voting rights in an investee cannot have power if the relevant activities are subject to direction by a government, court, administrator, receiver, liquidator or regulator. Power without a majority of the voting rights B38 An investor can have power even if it holds less than a majority of the voting rights of an investee. An investor can have power with less than a majority of the voting rights of an investee, for example, through: AASB APPENDIX B

30 (a) (c) (d) (e) a contractual arrangement between the investor and other vote holders (see paragraph B39); rights arising from other contractual arrangements (see paragraph B40); the investor s voting rights (see paragraphs B41 B45); potential voting rights (see paragraphs B47 B50); or a combination of (a) (d). Contractual arrangement with other vote holders B39 A contractual arrangement between an investor and other vote holders can give the investor the right to exercise voting rights sufficient to give the investor power, even if the investor does not have voting rights sufficient to give it power without the contractual arrangement. However, a contractual arrangement might ensure that the investor can direct enough other vote holders on how to vote to enable the investor to make decisions about the relevant activities. Rights from other contractual arrangements B40 Other decision-making rights, in combination with voting rights, can give an investor the current ability to direct the relevant activities. For example, the rights specified in a contractual arrangement in combination with voting rights may be sufficient to give an investor the current ability to direct the manufacturing processes of an investee or to direct other operating or financing activities of an investee that significantly affect the investee s returns. However, in the absence of any other rights, economic dependence of an investee on the investor (such as relations of a supplier with its main customer) does not lead to the investor having power over the investee. The investor s voting rights B41 An investor with less than a majority of the voting rights has rights that are sufficient to give it power when the investor has the practical ability to direct the relevant activities unilaterally. B42 When assessing whether an investor s voting rights are sufficient to give it power, an investor considers all facts and circumstances, including: AASB APPENDIX B

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