Zero: 2016 Connecticut Housing Placement Targets. May 2015

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1 Zero: 2016 Connecticut Housing Placement Targets May 2015

2 Presentation Outline Zero: 2016 Overview Zero: 2016 Metrics Housing Placement Targets Monthly Housing Placement Targets Functional Zero Data & Reporting Progress Towards Zero Next Steps How to Learn More Acronym Dictionary

3 Zero: 2016 Overview National initiative led by Community Solutions to end Veteran and chronic homelessness in the next two years. Of the 71 communities in Zero: 2016, CT is one of only 4 states participating. Over 40 partners across CT have signed on as supporters of the initiative!

4 Zero: 2016 Goals End Veteran homelessness in CT by the end of End chronic homelessness (those who have been homeless for a long time and have a disability) in CT by the end of 2016.

5 Zero: 2016 CT Leads Elizabeth Grim Policy Analyst Brian Roccapriore Director of Homeless Management Information System and Strategic Analysis

6 Acronyms in Presentation CoC CAN GPD TIP HMIS HOMES HOPWA PIT PSH RRH SSVF VASH VI-SPDAT Continuum of Care Coordinated Access Network Grant Per Diem Transition in Place Homeless Management Information System Homeless Management Evaluation System Housing Opportunities for Persons with AIDS Point-in-Time Count Permanent Supportive Housing Rapid Re-Housing Supportive Services for Veteran Families Veterans Affairs Supportive Housing Vulnerability Index Services Prioritization Decision Assistance Tool Definitions of each acronym are included at the end of the presentation

7 Zero: 2016 Metrics Housing Placement Target Monthly Housing Placement Rate Functional Zero

8 Housing Placement Targets

9 Housing Placement Target: Definition The total number of people in CT experiencing homelessness (Veterans or chronically homeless), plus estimated inflow, that will need to be housed in order to meet the goals of Zero: These numbers are estimates and will continue to be fine-tuned as better data becomes available across the state.

10 Housing Placement Targets: Veterans

11 Housing Placement Target: Veterans Veterans need to be 863 permanently housed to end Veteran homelessness by the end of 2015 Calculation based on data from Veterans Affairs (VA) Central Office, VA Medical Center, VA CT housing programs, CT Point-in-Time Count

12 How Was This Calculated? Community Solutions calculated an annualization multiplier (~2.90) to estimate the number of people who will enter into homelessness over the course of 1 year. How was this multiplier calculated? Community Solutions researched Veterans Affairs (VA) Central Office and VA Medical Center data on a Continuum of Care (CoC) level. Community Solutions compared this data with the 2014 CT Point-in-Time (PIT) numbers and actual placements in CT VA housing programs over the past two years.

13 How Was This Calculated? 2014 PIT Count Projected 2015 inflow + = Est. Housing Placement Target = annualization multiplier 645 (2.90*221) 863

14 Estimated Veterans by CoC Estimates based on data from VA Central Office and VA Medical Center

15 Estimated Housing Needs 863 Veterans to be housed Chronically Homeless (20%) ~173 Veterans Episodic and Short-term Homeless (80%) ~690 Veterans PSH/VASH (100%) ~173 Veterans Rapid Rehousing (SSVF) (37.5%) ~259 Veterans Other Residential Programs (37.5%) ~259 Veterans Self Resolving (25%) ~172 Veterans These % are based on national data on housing placement and eligibility

16 Housing Placement Targets: Chronically Homeless

17 How Many Chronic? 1,094 Individuals experiencing chronic homelessness need to be permanently housed by the end of 2016 Calculation based on 2014 annual data from the CT Homeless Management Information System (HMIS)

18 How Was This Calculated? U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) recently changed the definition of chronically homeless. The 2014 HUD data standards, which went into effect October 1, 2014 include more qualifying questions about having a physical or mental health disability than the 2010 HUD data standards, making the new data more accurate. Because of this change, Zero: 2016 CT is using Homeless Management Information System (HMIS) rather than Point-in-Time count (PIT) data to calculate the chronic housing placement target.

19 How Was This Calculated? The number of people who experienced chronic homelessness in 2014 was used as a baseline (2014 annual HMIS data). CCEH then analyzed nearly 7,000 HMIS intakes between October 2014 and April CCEH found that 45% of those who were considered chronic under the 2010 HMIS data standards were still considered chronic under the new 2014 HMIS data standards.

20 How Was This Calculated? 2014 Annual HMIS x = HMIS Multiplier Est. Housing Placement Target x = % 1094

21 Estimated Chronic by CAN HMIS data was used to calculate the percentage of unduplicated people experiencing chronic homelessness by Coordinated Access Network (CAN). These percentages were applied to the statewide number to get the CAN-specific housing targets.

22 Estimated Chronic by CAN Estimates of the number of individuals experiencing chronic homelessness per CAN based on 2014 annual HMIS data

23 Estimated Chronic by CAN Coordinated Access Network % of all chronic individuals in CT for each CAN Estimated number of individuals who are chronically homeless Central CT 5% 54 Fairfield 23% 250 Greater Hartford 32% 357 Greater New Haven 19% 205 Meriden/Middlesex/Wallingford 4% 43 Northeastern CT 3% 33 Southeastern CT 7% 76 Waterbury/Litchfield 7% % 1094 For example, the chronic population in Central CT is about 5% of all chronic individuals in the state. Therefore, 54 people are estimated to experience chronic homelessness in the state (1094 x 5% = 54)

24 Estimated Housing Needs 1094 chronically homeless need to be housed Permanent Supportive Housing (90%) ~ 985 people Rapid Re- Housing (5%) ~55 people Other (5%) ~54 people These % are based on national data on housing placement and eligibility

25 Actual PSH Available in CT There is shortage of PSH units in Connecticut by approximately 217 PSH units (~20%) across the state 136 New State PSH 193 New HUD PSH 548 Estimated PSH Turnover 217 Unmet Need

26 PSH Resources (units) by CAN Coordinated Access Network New State PSH HUD Bonus PSH Est. PSH Turnover Housing Target Unmet Need Central CT Fairfield Greater Hartford Greater New Haven Meriden/Middlesex/Wallingford Northeastern CT Southeastern CT Waterbury/Litchfield RED = gap in resources GREEN (-) = excess resources

27 PSH Turnover What is PSH turnover? The number of Permanent Supportive Housing (PSH) units vacated over a 12 month period. How was PSH turnover calculated? Looked at the number of units that were vacated by year over the past 3 years. The numbers in the previous slide represent the lowest annual numbers during the 3 year period. This means the numbers are likely a conservative estimate of PSH turnover.

28 Monthly Housing Placement Rate Veteran Monthly Housing Placement Rate Chronic Monthly Housing Placement Rate

29 Monthly Housing Placement Rate: Definition The number of individuals who are homeless (Veterans or chronic) who need to be permanently housed each month in order to reach the goals of Zero: 2016.

30 What Is Permanent Housing? Permanent housing for formerly homeless persons [i.e., Housing Opportunities for Persons with AIDS (HOPWA), Continuum of Care (CoC) project] Rental by client With Veterans Affairs Supportive Housing (VASH) housing subsidy With other ongoing subsidy With Grant Per Diem Transition in Place (GPD TIP) subsidy No ongoing subsidy Owned by client With ongoing subsidy With no ongoing subsidy Staying or living with family, permanent tenure Staying or living with friends, permanent tenure

31 Monthly Housing Placement Rate: Calculation Housing Placement Target = # Months in Zero:2016 Monthly Housing Placement Target 12 months for Veterans until end of months for chronic until end of 2016

32 Monthly HPT: Veterans 72 Veterans need to be housed per month in CT to end Veteran homelessness by the end of 2015 Housing Placement Target = # Months in Zero:2016 Monthly Housing Placement Target =

33 Monthly HPT: Chronic 46 chronically homeless individuals need to be housed per month in CT to end chronic homelessness by the end of 2016 Housing Placement Target = # Months in Zero:2016 Monthly Housing Placement Target =

34 Functional Zero

35 Functional Zero: Definition Functional zero means that we will have the systems and resources in place so if a Veteran becomes homeless or someone is identified as chronically homeless: they can be re-housed quickly. Zero does not mean that no one will ever experience homelessness in CT again.

36 Data & Reporting Where does the data come from? Who is reporting the data? What progress has been made?

37 What Are the Data Sources? Veteran permanent housing placements: HMIS database (Homeless Management Information System) VA HOMES database (Homeless Management Evaluation System) Chronic permanent housing placements: HMIS database (Homeless Management Information System)

38 Reminder Permanent Housing Includes: Permanent housing for formerly homeless persons [i.e., Housing Opportunities for Persons with AIDS (HOPWA), Continuum of Care (CoC) project] Rental by client With Veterans Affairs Supportive Housing (VASH) housing subsidy With other ongoing subsidy With Grant Per Diem Transition in Place (GPD TIP) subsidy No ongoing subsidy Owned by client With ongoing subsidy With no ongoing subsidy Staying or living with family, permanent tenure Staying or living with friends, permanent tenure

39 How is the Data Reported? All information on permanent housing placements is pulled directly from HMIS and HOMES. CCEH reports the permanent housing placements to Community Solutions on the 20 th of each month. Data on monthly placements will be communicated via to the CAN leads by the end of the first full work week of the next month (ex. May 2015 placements will be reported by June 5 th ).

40 Progress Toward Zero

41 Is CT On Track? Yes! Housing placements between January 1 March 31, 2015 Veterans Chronic Timeframe: End of 2015 Timeframe: End of housed 155 housed 29% housed 616 to be housed 939 to be housed 14% housed 247 Veterans were housed, which is 31 housing placements more than the quarterly goal of people experiencing chronic homelessness were housed, which is 17 more than the goal of 138

42 Veteran Housing Placements on track to house 863 people by Monthly Housing Target: 72 January February March Data source: HMIS & HOMES

43 Chronic Housing Placements on track to house 1094 people by Monthly Housing Target: 46 January February March Data sources: HMIS

44 Progress Nationally Check out the progress of all 71 Zero: 2016 sites across the United States online: Zero: 2016 Dashboard

45 Next Steps Housing Placement Target Adjustments

46 Housing Placement Target: Community Adjustments The data outlined in this presentation gives the best estimates of the number of Veterans and individuals who are experiencing chronic homelessness, using equations informed by national and local data. Now it s time to advance and tailor the effort by moving from statistical estimates to a personcentered by-name list.

47 Housing Placement Target: Community Adjustments The Zero: 2016 CT team will engage with each CAN during the upcoming months. Working together, the Zero: 2016 CT team and CAN leaders will fine tune housing placement targets for each CAN.

48 Housing Placement Target: Community Adjustments Steps to refining housing placement targets: Develop CAN VI-SPDAT registry Compare registry to other available data sources (i.e., HMIS) Project annual inflow into chronic homelessness

49 Frequently Asked Questions What data should I report? What should I be doing? How are decisions made?

50 What Data Should I Report? None! CCEH will report all data to Community Solutions on a monthly basis. Data will be pulled from HMIS and HOMES.

51 What Should I Be Doing? YOU are the experts! CONTINUE working together with providers in your Coordinated Access Network and doing the great work moving people into housing at the local level! Assess folks using the VI-SPDAT Update housing registry Prioritize housing resources by need Update HMIS accordingly Move people into housing

52 How Are Decisions Made? The Zero: 2016 CT Leads will work with the Zero: 2016 coaches to brainstorm strategies based on national best practices and local needs. The Zero: 2016 CT Leads will then present these ideas on a monthly basis to the Reaching Home Retooling the Crisis Response System Workgroup, which will serve as the advisory committee. The Zero: 2016 CT Leads will also work with the Reaching Home Coordinating Committee around Zero: 2016 press and social media.

53 How Can I Learn More? Community Solutions Website Zero: 2016 CT Website Zero: 2016 Communications

54 Community Solutions Website Community Solutions is leading the national Zero: 2016 effort and they have additional resources available online, including: What is a housing placement target? How is zero measured? How are communities creating a collaborative system to get to zero? How are communities assessing individual's needs and matching resources to those needs?

55 Zero: 2016 CT Visit the Zero: 2016 CT website: Keep an eye out for monthly Zero: 2016 CT updates in: CCEH monthly newsletters PSC s bi-monthly newsletters

56 Questions? Contact: Elizabeth Grim Policy Analyst Brian Roccapriore Director of Strategic Analysis and Homeless Management Information System

57 Explanation of Acronyms CAN CoC GPD TIP HMIS HOMES HOPWA PIT PSH RRH SSVF VASH VI-SDPAT

58 Acronym: CAN Coordinated Access Network Groups of regional providers coordinating system-wide entry, assessment, and referrals to those in need (i.e., services and housing for those experiencing homelessness). Required through the Homeless Emergency Assistance and Rapid Transition to Housing (HEARTH) Act of CT has 8 CANs: Central, Hartford, Fairfield County, Middlesex/Meriden/Wallingford, New Haven, Northeastern, Southeastern, Waterbury/Litchfield.

59 Acronym: CoC Continuum of Care A regional planning group that coordinates funding for housing and services for individuals and families experiencing homelessness. CT has 3 CoCs: Balance of State, Hartford, Fairfield County. Required by HUD. Funding from HUD goes through the CoCs.

60 Acronym: GPD TIP Grant Per Diem Transition in Place Housing model through the Department of Veterans Affairs. Offers Veterans housing and supportive services in which the services transition out of the housing over time and the Veteran can take over the lease, rather than moving the Veteran to a new housing unit that does not have services attached after their allotted 24 months in the program pass.

61 Acronym: HMIS Homeless Management Information System Electronic database used to collect information about individuals experiencing homelessness (i.e., demographics, housing status, service history). All programs that receiving funding from HUD must report data in HMIS.

62 Acronym: HOMES Homeless Management Evaluation System U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs database that tracks the care of homeless Veterans, including housing placements.

63 Acronym: HOPWA Housing Opportunities for Persons with AIDS Federal program that provides housing to people living with HIV/AIDS.

64 Acronym: PIT Point-in-Time Count Count of persons experiencing homelessness in the U.S. that occurs on one night every year in January. Required by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. Provides an estimate of the level of need in communities across the U.S.

65 Acronym: PSH Permanent Supportive Housing Housing model that links a rental subsidy to case management and supportive services Cost-effective approach to serve the most high-need individuals and families experiencing homelessness.

66 Acronym: RRH Rapid Re-Housing Housing model that moves people experiencing homelessness into permanent housing as quickly as possible by providing short-term financial assistance (ex., utility bill, rental assistance) and support services, as needed.

67 Acronym: SSVF Supportive Service for Veteran Families Rapid re-housing program specifically for Veterans and their families. Provides short-term rental assistance and support services to quickly move Veteran families experiencing homelessness into permanent housing.

68 Acronym: VASH Veterans Affairs Supportive Housing Joint program with the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development and U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. Provides housing to Veterans experiencing homelessness by linking a rental subsidy to case management and supportive services.

69 VI-SPDAT Vulnerability Index Service Prioritization Decision Assistance Tool Standard tool used to assess an individual s or family s level of need. Allows communities to prioritize service delivery and to provide tailored interventions based on level of need.