Human Genome and Human Genome Project. Louxin Zhang

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "Human Genome and Human Genome Project. Louxin Zhang"

Transcription

1 Human Genome and Human Genome Project Louxin Zhang

2 A Primer to Genomics Cells are the fundamental working units of every living systems. DNA is made of 4 nucleotide bases. The DNA sequence is the particular side-by-side arrangement of bases along the DNA strand. This order spells out the exact instructions required to create a particular organism. The genome is an organism s complete set of DNA. Except for mature red blood cells, all human cells contains a complete genome arranged in 24 distinct chromosomes.

3 A Primer to Genomics Each chromosome contains many genes, the basic physical and functional units of heredity. Genes are specific sequences of bases that encode instructions on how to make proteins. Proteins perform most life functions and even make up the majority of cellular structures. Proteins are large, complex molecules made up of smaller subunits called amino acids. A protein folds up into specific three-dimensional structure that define their particular functions in the cell.

4

5 Human Genome Project: Background HGP arose from two key insights in the early 1980s. 1. The ability to take global views of genomes could greatly accelerate biomedical research, by allowing researchers to attack problems in a comprehensive fashion. 2. The creation of such global views would requires a communal effort in infrastructure research.

6 Human Genome Project Background Key projects helped to crystallize the insights, including i) The sequencing of the some bacterial and animal viruses, as well as the human mitochondrion between 1977 and ii) The development of (random) shotgun sequencing of long DNA fragments for highthroughput gene discovery, later dubbed with expressed sequence tags(etss) and assembling computer programs.

7 How does the human genome stack up? Organism Human (Homo sapiens) Laboratory mouse (M. musculus) Mustard weed (A. thaliana) Roundworm (C. elegans) Fruit fly (D. melanogaster) Yeast (S. cerevisiae) Bacterium (E. coli) Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Genome Size (Bases) 3 billion 2.6 billion 100 million 97 million 137 million 12.1 million 4.6 million 9700 Estimated Genes 30,000 30,000 25,000 19,000 13,000 6,000 3,200 9

8 Human Genome Project Goals The idea of sequencing the entire human genome was first proposed in discussions at scientific meetings from 1984 to And a broader programme was recommended in a report by NRC, USA in 1998: Sequencing the human genome: creation of genetic, physical and sequence maps of the human genome. Parallel efforts in key model organisms. The development of technology in support of these objectives Research in the ethical, legal, and social issues raised by the programme.

9 Human Genome Project Milestones: 1990: Project initiated as joint effort of U.S. Department of Energy and the National Institutes of Health June 2000: Completion of a working draft of the entire human genome February 2001: Analyses of the working draft are published April 2003: HGP sequencing is completed and Project is declared finished two years ahead of schedule U.S. Department of Energy Genome Programs, Genomics and Its Impact on Science and Society, 2003

10

11 By the Numbers What does the draft human genome sequence tell us? The human genome contains 3 billion chemical nucleotide bases (A, C, T, and G). The average gene consists of 3000 bases, but sizes vary greatly, with the largest known human gene being dystrophin at 2.4 million bases. The total number of genes is estimated at around 30,000-- much lower than previous estimates of 80,000 to 140,000. Almost all (99.9%) nucleotide bases are exactly the same in all people. The functions are unknown for over 50% of discovered genes. U.S. Department of Energy Genome Programs, Genomics and Its Impact on Science and Society, 2003

12 What does the draft human genome sequence tell us How It's Arranged The human genome's gene-dense "urban centers" are in nucleotides G and C. In contrast, the gene-poor "deserts" are rich in the DNA nucleotides A and T.

13 What does the draft human genome sequence tell us Genes appear to be concentrated in random areas along the genome, with vast expanses of noncoding DNA between. Chromosome 1 has the most genes (2968), and the Y chromosome has the fewest (231).

14 The Wheat from the Chaff What does the draft human genome sequence tell us? Less than 2% of the genome codes for proteins. Repeated sequences that do not code for proteins ("junk DNA") make up at least 50% of the human genome. Repetitive sequences shed light on chromosome structure and dynamics. Over time, these repeats reshape the genome by rearranging it, creating entirely new genes, and modifying and reshuffling existing genes.

15 What does the draft human genome sequence tell us The repeats fall into five classes: i) transposon-derived repeats, known as interspersed repeats. ii) inactive retroposed copies of cellular genes, known as processed pseudogenes. Nonfunctional copies of the exon sequences of an active gene and thought to arise by integration into chromosomes of a natural cdna sequence generated by reverse transcription. iii) repeats of short k-mers such as (A)n, (CA)n, (AAT)n. Since they show a high degree of length polymorphisms in the human population, (CA)n repeat have been used as genetic marker in genetic mapping.

16 What does the draft human genome sequence tell us iv) segmental duplications, consisting of blocks of kb that have been copied from one region of the genome into another region. Such duplications appears often in pericentromeres and subtelomeres of chromosomes. Recurrent structural rearrangements in duplication regions give rise to contiguous gene syndromes. v) tandemly repeated sequences, usually at centromere, telomers, the short arms of acrocentric chromosomes and ribosomal gene clusters. These regions are underrepresented in the draft genome sequence.

17 What does the draft human genome sequence tell us? How the Human Compares with Other Organisms Unlike the human's seemingly random distribution of gene-rich areas, many other organisms' genomes are more uniform, with genes evenly spaced throughout. Humans have on average three times as many kinds of proteins as the fly or worm because of mrna transcript "alternative splicing" and chemical modifications to the proteins. Humans share most of the same protein families with worms, flies, and plants; but the number of gene family members has expanded in humans, especially in proteins involved in development and immunity. The human genome has a much greater portion (50%) of repeat sequences than the mustard weed (11%), the worm (7%), and the fly (3%). U.S. Department of Energy Genome Programs, Genomics and Its Impact on Science and Society, 2003

18 What does the draft human genome sequence tell us? Variations and Mutations Scientists have identified about 3 million locations where single-base DNA differences (SNPs) occur in humans. This information promises to revolutionize the processes of finding chromosomal locations for disease-associated sequences and tracing human history. The ratio of germline (sperm or egg cell) mutations is 2:1 in males vs females. Researchers point to several reasons for the higher mutation rate in the male germline, including the greater number of cell divisions required for sperm formation than for eggs. U.S. Department of Energy Genome Programs, Genomics and Its Impact on Science and Society, 2003

19 Future Challenges: What We Still Don t Know Gene number, exact locations, and functions Noncoding DNA types, amount, distribution, information content, and functions Functional genomics Evolutionary conservation among organisms Proteomes (total protein content and function) in organisms Correlation of SNPs (single-base DNA variations among individuals) with health and disease Genes involved in complex traits and multigene diseases U.S. Department of Energy Genome Programs, Genomics and Its Impact on Science and Society, 2003

20 Anticipated Benefits of Genome Research Molecular Medicine improve diagnosis of disease create drugs based on molecular information design custom drugs (pharmacogenomics) based on individual genetic profiles Microbial Genomics rapidly detect and treat pathogens (disease-causing microbes) in clinical practice protect citizenry from biological and chemical warfare U.S. Department of Energy Genome Programs, Genomics and Its Impact on Science and Society, 2003

21 Anticipated Benefits of Genome Research-cont. Risk Assessment evaluate the health risks faced by individuals who may be exposed to radiation (including low levels in industrial areas) and to cancer-causing chemicals and toxins Bioarchaeology, Anthropology, Evolution, and Human Migration study evolution through germline mutations in lineages study migration of different population groups based on maternal inheritance study mutations on the Y chromosome to trace lineage and migration of males U.S. Department of Energy Genome Programs, Genomics and Its Impact on Science and Society, 2003

22 Anticipated Benefits of Genome Research-cont. DNA Identification (Forensics) identify potential suspects whose DNA may match evidence left at crime scenes exonerate persons wrongly accused of crimes identify crime and catastrophe victims establish paternity and other family relationships U.S. Department of Energy Genome Programs, Genomics and Its Impact on Science and Society, 2003

23 Anticipated Benefits of Genome Research-cont. Agriculture, Livestock Breeding, and Bioprocessing grow disease-, insect-, and drought-resistant crops breed healthier, more productive, disease-resistant farm animals grow more nutritious produce develop biopesticides incorporate edible vaccines incorporated into food products develop new environmental cleanup uses for plants like tobacco U.S. Department of Energy Genome Programs, Genomics and Its Impact on Science and Society, 2003

24 Sequencing Strategy: Hierarchical shotgun sequencing

LECTURE 12: INSIGHTS FROM GENOME SEQUENCING. Read Chapter 12 (p500-523) p724 (ortholog vs paralog) DOE s genomics and its impact

LECTURE 12: INSIGHTS FROM GENOME SEQUENCING. Read Chapter 12 (p500-523) p724 (ortholog vs paralog) DOE s genomics and its impact LECTURE 12: INSIGHTS FROM GENOME SEQUENCING Read Chapter 12 (p500-523) p724 (ortholog vs paralog) DOE s genomics and its impact 1 Genome sequencing changed the practice of biology, genetics and genomics

More information

The Human Genome Project. From genome to health From human genome to other genomes and to gene function Structural Genomics initiative

The Human Genome Project. From genome to health From human genome to other genomes and to gene function Structural Genomics initiative The Human Genome Project From genome to health From human genome to other genomes and to gene function Structural Genomics initiative June 2000 What is the Human Genome Project? U.S. govt. project coordinated

More information

Special Human Genome issues Feb 2001

Special Human Genome issues Feb 2001 Computational Biology 2 Lecture 3 Special Human Genome issues Feb 2001 Pawan Dhar BII A quick look Q. What is the Human Genome Project? A massive research effort to determine complete sequence of 3 billion

More information

Biological Sciences Initiative. Human Genome

Biological Sciences Initiative. Human Genome Biological Sciences Initiative HHMI Human Genome Introduction In 2000, researchers from around the world published a draft sequence of the entire genome. 20 labs from 6 countries worked on the sequence.

More information

Human Genome Organization: An Update. Genome Organization: An Update

Human Genome Organization: An Update. Genome Organization: An Update Human Genome Organization: An Update Genome Organization: An Update Highlights of Human Genome Project Timetable Proposed in 1990 as 3 billion dollar joint venture between DOE and NIH with 15 year completion

More information

Just the Facts: A Basic Introduction to the Science Underlying NCBI Resources

Just the Facts: A Basic Introduction to the Science Underlying NCBI Resources 1 of 8 11/7/2004 11:00 AM National Center for Biotechnology Information About NCBI NCBI at a Glance A Science Primer Human Genome Resources Model Organisms Guide Outreach and Education Databases and Tools

More information

CCR Biology - Chapter 9 Practice Test - Summer 2012

CCR Biology - Chapter 9 Practice Test - Summer 2012 Name: Class: Date: CCR Biology - Chapter 9 Practice Test - Summer 2012 Multiple Choice Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question. 1. Genetic engineering is possible

More information

Basic Concepts of DNA, Proteins, Genes and Genomes

Basic Concepts of DNA, Proteins, Genes and Genomes Basic Concepts of DNA, Proteins, Genes and Genomes Kun-Mao Chao 1,2,3 1 Graduate Institute of Biomedical Electronics and Bioinformatics 2 Department of Computer Science and Information Engineering 3 Graduate

More information

Structure and Function of DNA

Structure and Function of DNA Structure and Function of DNA DNA and RNA Structure DNA and RNA are nucleic acids. They consist of chemical units called nucleotides. The nucleotides are joined by a sugar-phosphate backbone. The four

More information

Nature of Genetic Material. Nature of Genetic Material

Nature of Genetic Material. Nature of Genetic Material Core Category Nature of Genetic Material Nature of Genetic Material Core Concepts in Genetics (in bold)/example Learning Objectives How is DNA organized? Describe the types of DNA regions that do not encode

More information

Human Mendelian Disorders. Genetic Technology. What is Genetics? Genes are DNA 9/3/2008. Multifactorial Disorders

Human Mendelian Disorders. Genetic Technology. What is Genetics? Genes are DNA 9/3/2008. Multifactorial Disorders Human genetics: Why? Human Genetics Introduction Determine genotypic basis of variant phenotypes to facilitate: Understanding biological basis of human genetic diversity Prenatal diagnosis Predictive testing

More information

A Primer of Genome Science THIRD

A Primer of Genome Science THIRD A Primer of Genome Science THIRD EDITION GREG GIBSON-SPENCER V. MUSE North Carolina State University Sinauer Associates, Inc. Publishers Sunderland, Massachusetts USA Contents Preface xi 1 Genome Projects:

More information

13.4 Gene Regulation and Expression

13.4 Gene Regulation and Expression 13.4 Gene Regulation and Expression Lesson Objectives Describe gene regulation in prokaryotes. Explain how most eukaryotic genes are regulated. Relate gene regulation to development in multicellular organisms.

More information

The correct answer is c B. Answer b is incorrect. Type II enzymes recognize and cut a specific site, not at random sites.

The correct answer is c B. Answer b is incorrect. Type II enzymes recognize and cut a specific site, not at random sites. 1. A recombinant DNA molecules is one that is a. produced through the process of crossing over that occurs in meiosis b. constructed from DNA from different sources c. constructed from novel combinations

More information

Biology Behind the Crime Scene Week 4: Lab #4 Genetics Exercise (Meiosis) and RFLP Analysis of DNA

Biology Behind the Crime Scene Week 4: Lab #4 Genetics Exercise (Meiosis) and RFLP Analysis of DNA Page 1 of 5 Biology Behind the Crime Scene Week 4: Lab #4 Genetics Exercise (Meiosis) and RFLP Analysis of DNA Genetics Exercise: Understanding how meiosis affects genetic inheritance and DNA patterns

More information

The Human Genome Project

The Human Genome Project The Human Genome Project Brief History of the Human Genome Project Physical Chromosome Maps Genetic (or Linkage) Maps DNA Markers Sequencing and Annotating Genomic DNA What Have We learned from the HGP?

More information

Genetics Test Biology I

Genetics Test Biology I Genetics Test Biology I Multiple Choice Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question. 1. Avery s experiments showed that bacteria are transformed by a. RNA. c. proteins.

More information

Mutations & DNA Technology Worksheet

Mutations & DNA Technology Worksheet Mutations & DNA Technology Worksheet Name Section A: Mutations Mutations are changes in DNA. Somatic mutations occur in non-reproductive cells and won't be passed onto offspring. Mutations that occur in

More information

Worksheet - COMPARATIVE MAPPING 1

Worksheet - COMPARATIVE MAPPING 1 Worksheet - COMPARATIVE MAPPING 1 The arrangement of genes and other DNA markers is compared between species in Comparative genome mapping. As early as 1915, the geneticist J.B.S Haldane reported that

More information

Chapter 9. Biotechnology and Recombinant DNA Biotechnology and Recombinant DNA

Chapter 9. Biotechnology and Recombinant DNA Biotechnology and Recombinant DNA Chapter 9 Biotechnology and Recombinant DNA Biotechnology and Recombinant DNA Q&A Interferons are species specific, so that interferons to be used in humans must be produced in human cells. Can you think

More information

BioBoot Camp Genetics

BioBoot Camp Genetics BioBoot Camp Genetics BIO.B.1.2.1 Describe how the process of DNA replication results in the transmission and/or conservation of genetic information DNA Replication is the process of DNA being copied before

More information

Bob Jesberg. Boston, MA April 3, 2014

Bob Jesberg. Boston, MA April 3, 2014 DNA, Replication and Transcription Bob Jesberg NSTA Conference Boston, MA April 3, 2014 1 Workshop Agenda Looking at DNA and Forensics The DNA, Replication i and Transcription i Set DNA Ladder The Double

More information

Mitochondrial DNA Analysis

Mitochondrial DNA Analysis Mitochondrial DNA Analysis Lineage Markers Lineage markers are passed down from generation to generation without changing Except for rare mutation events They can help determine the lineage (family tree)

More information

Genetics Lecture Notes 7.03 2005. Lectures 1 2

Genetics Lecture Notes 7.03 2005. Lectures 1 2 Genetics Lecture Notes 7.03 2005 Lectures 1 2 Lecture 1 We will begin this course with the question: What is a gene? This question will take us four lectures to answer because there are actually several

More information

Meiosis and Sexual Life Cycles

Meiosis and Sexual Life Cycles Meiosis and Sexual Life Cycles Chapter 13 1 Ojectives Distinguish between the following terms: somatic cell and gamete; autosome and sex chromosomes; haploid and diploid. List the phases of meiosis I and

More information

DNA Replication & Protein Synthesis. This isn t a baaaaaaaddd chapter!!!

DNA Replication & Protein Synthesis. This isn t a baaaaaaaddd chapter!!! DNA Replication & Protein Synthesis This isn t a baaaaaaaddd chapter!!! The Discovery of DNA s Structure Watson and Crick s discovery of DNA s structure was based on almost fifty years of research by other

More information

Transcription Study Guide

Transcription Study Guide Transcription Study Guide This study guide is a written version of the material you have seen presented in the transcription unit. The cell s DNA contains the instructions for carrying out the work of

More information

Genetic information (DNA) determines structure of proteins DNA RNA proteins cell structure 3.11 3.15 enzymes control cell chemistry ( metabolism )

Genetic information (DNA) determines structure of proteins DNA RNA proteins cell structure 3.11 3.15 enzymes control cell chemistry ( metabolism ) Biology 1406 Exam 3 Notes Structure of DNA Ch. 10 Genetic information (DNA) determines structure of proteins DNA RNA proteins cell structure 3.11 3.15 enzymes control cell chemistry ( metabolism ) Proteins

More information

MUTATION, DNA REPAIR AND CANCER

MUTATION, DNA REPAIR AND CANCER MUTATION, DNA REPAIR AND CANCER 1 Mutation A heritable change in the genetic material Essential to the continuity of life Source of variation for natural selection New mutations are more likely to be harmful

More information

An Overview of Cells and Cell Research

An Overview of Cells and Cell Research An Overview of Cells and Cell Research 1 An Overview of Cells and Cell Research Chapter Outline Model Species and Cell types Cell components Tools of Cell Biology Model Species E. Coli: simplest organism

More information

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON HARMONISATION OF TECHNICAL REQUIREMENTS FOR REGISTRATION OF PHARMACEUTICALS FOR HUMAN USE E15

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON HARMONISATION OF TECHNICAL REQUIREMENTS FOR REGISTRATION OF PHARMACEUTICALS FOR HUMAN USE E15 INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON HARMONISATION OF TECHNICAL REQUIREMENTS FOR REGISTRATION OF PHARMACEUTICALS FOR HUMAN USE ICH HARMONISED TRIPARTITE GUIDELINE DEFINITIONS FOR GENOMIC BIOMARKERS, PHARMACOGENOMICS,

More information

Algorithms in Computational Biology (236522) spring 2007 Lecture #1

Algorithms in Computational Biology (236522) spring 2007 Lecture #1 Algorithms in Computational Biology (236522) spring 2007 Lecture #1 Lecturer: Shlomo Moran, Taub 639, tel 4363 Office hours: Tuesday 11:00-12:00/by appointment TA: Ilan Gronau, Taub 700, tel 4894 Office

More information

Curs Bioinformática. Grau Genética

Curs Bioinformática. Grau Genética Curs Bioinformática. Grau Genética GENÓMICA INTRODUCTION TO GENOME SCIENCE Antonio Barbadilla Group Genomics, Bioinformatics & Evolution Institut Biotecnologia I Biomedicina Departament de Genètica i Microbiologia

More information

Biotechnology and Recombinant DNA (Chapter 9) Lecture Materials for Amy Warenda Czura, Ph.D. Suffolk County Community College

Biotechnology and Recombinant DNA (Chapter 9) Lecture Materials for Amy Warenda Czura, Ph.D. Suffolk County Community College Biotechnology and Recombinant DNA (Chapter 9) Lecture Materials for Amy Warenda Czura, Ph.D. Suffolk County Community College Primary Source for figures and content: Eastern Campus Tortora, G.J. Microbiology

More information

Y Chromosome Markers

Y Chromosome Markers Y Chromosome Markers Lineage Markers Autosomal chromosomes recombine with each meiosis Y and Mitochondrial DNA does not This means that the Y and mtdna remains constant from generation to generation Except

More information

Next Generation Sequencing

Next Generation Sequencing Next Generation Sequencing Technology and applications 10/1/2015 Jeroen Van Houdt - Genomics Core - KU Leuven - UZ Leuven 1 Landmarks in DNA sequencing 1953 Discovery of DNA double helix structure 1977

More information

Genomes and SNPs in Malaria and Sickle Cell Anemia

Genomes and SNPs in Malaria and Sickle Cell Anemia Genomes and SNPs in Malaria and Sickle Cell Anemia Introduction to Genome Browsing with Ensembl Ensembl The vast amount of information in biological databases today demands a way of organising and accessing

More information

1865 Discovery: Heredity Transmitted in Units

1865 Discovery: Heredity Transmitted in Units 1859 Discovery: Natural Selection Genetic Timeline Charles Darwin wrote On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection, or the Preservation of Favored Races in the Struggle for Life. 1865 Discovery:

More information

Lecture 6: Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphisms (RFLPs)

Lecture 6: Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphisms (RFLPs) Lecture 6: Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphisms (RFLPs) Single nucleotide polymorphisms or SNPs (pronounced "snips") are DNA sequence variations that occur

More information

Gene mutation and molecular medicine Chapter 15

Gene mutation and molecular medicine Chapter 15 Gene mutation and molecular medicine Chapter 15 Lecture Objectives What Are Mutations? How Are DNA Molecules and Mutations Analyzed? How Do Defective Proteins Lead to Diseases? What DNA Changes Lead to

More information

Copyright 1999 2003 by Mark Brandt, Ph.D.

Copyright 1999 2003 by Mark Brandt, Ph.D. Central dogma of molecular biology The term central dogma of molecular biology is patterned after religious terminology. owever, it refers to a process that is subject to the changes in understanding that

More information

14.3 Studying the Human Genome

14.3 Studying the Human Genome 14.3 Studying the Human Genome Lesson Objectives Summarize the methods of DNA analysis. State the goals of the Human Genome Project and explain what we have learned so far. Lesson Summary Manipulating

More information

Translation Study Guide

Translation Study Guide Translation Study Guide This study guide is a written version of the material you have seen presented in the replication unit. In translation, the cell uses the genetic information contained in mrna to

More information

12.1 The Role of DNA in Heredity

12.1 The Role of DNA in Heredity 12.1 The Role of DNA in Heredity Only in the last 50 years have scientists understood the role of DNA in heredity. That understanding began with the discovery of DNA s structure. In 1952, Rosalind Franklin

More information

Genetics Module B, Anchor 3

Genetics Module B, Anchor 3 Genetics Module B, Anchor 3 Key Concepts: - An individual s characteristics are determines by factors that are passed from one parental generation to the next. - During gamete formation, the alleles for

More information

Chapter 8: Recombinant DNA 2002 by W. H. Freeman and Company Chapter 8: Recombinant DNA 2002 by W. H. Freeman and Company

Chapter 8: Recombinant DNA 2002 by W. H. Freeman and Company Chapter 8: Recombinant DNA 2002 by W. H. Freeman and Company Genetic engineering: humans Gene replacement therapy or gene therapy Many technical and ethical issues implications for gene pool for germ-line gene therapy what traits constitute disease rather than just

More information

Lecture 13: DNA Technology. DNA Sequencing. DNA Sequencing Genetic Markers - RFLPs polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products of biotechnology

Lecture 13: DNA Technology. DNA Sequencing. DNA Sequencing Genetic Markers - RFLPs polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products of biotechnology Lecture 13: DNA Technology DNA Sequencing Genetic Markers - RFLPs polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products of biotechnology DNA Sequencing determine order of nucleotides in a strand of DNA > bases = A,

More information

Cancer Genomics: What Does It Mean for You?

Cancer Genomics: What Does It Mean for You? Cancer Genomics: What Does It Mean for You? The Connection Between Cancer and DNA One person dies from cancer each minute in the United States. That s 1,500 deaths each day. As the population ages, this

More information

Recombinant DNA and Biotechnology

Recombinant DNA and Biotechnology Recombinant DNA and Biotechnology Chapter 18 Lecture Objectives What Is Recombinant DNA? How Are New Genes Inserted into Cells? What Sources of DNA Are Used in Cloning? What Other Tools Are Used to Study

More information

Chapter 5: Organization and Expression of Immunoglobulin Genes

Chapter 5: Organization and Expression of Immunoglobulin Genes Chapter 5: Organization and Expression of Immunoglobulin Genes I. Genetic Model Compatible with Ig Structure A. Two models for Ab structure diversity 1. Germ-line theory: maintained that the genome contributed

More information

Genome and DNA Sequence Databases. BME 110/BIOL 181 CompBio Tools Todd Lowe March 31, 2009

Genome and DNA Sequence Databases. BME 110/BIOL 181 CompBio Tools Todd Lowe March 31, 2009 Genome and DNA Sequence Databases BME 110/BIOL 181 CompBio Tools Todd Lowe March 31, 2009 Admin Reading: Chapters 1 & 2 Notes available in PDF format on-line (see class calendar page): http://www.soe.ucsc.edu/classes/bme110/spring09/bme110-calendar.html

More information

Control of Gene Expression

Control of Gene Expression Home Gene Regulation Is Necessary? Control of Gene Expression By switching genes off when they are not needed, cells can prevent resources from being wasted. There should be natural selection favoring

More information

Biotechnology and Recombinant DNA

Biotechnology and Recombinant DNA Biotechnology and Recombinant DNA Recombinant DNA procedures - an overview Biotechnology: The use of microorganisms, cells, or cell components to make a product. Foods, antibiotics, vitamins, enzymes Recombinant

More information

GENETICS OF BACTERIA AND VIRUSES

GENETICS OF BACTERIA AND VIRUSES GENETICS OF BACTERIA AND VIRUSES 1 Genes of bacteria are found in bacterial chromosomes Usually a single type of chromosome May have more than one copy of that chromosome Number of copies depends on the

More information

Name Class Date. KEY CONCEPT Mutations are changes in DNA that may or may not affect phenotype. frameshift mutation

Name Class Date. KEY CONCEPT Mutations are changes in DNA that may or may not affect phenotype. frameshift mutation Unit 7 Study Guide Section 8.7: Mutations KEY CONCEPT Mutations are changes in DNA that may or may not affect phenotype. VOCABULARY mutation point mutation frameshift mutation mutagen MAIN IDEA: Some mutations

More information

Chapter 13: Meiosis and Sexual Life Cycles

Chapter 13: Meiosis and Sexual Life Cycles Name Period Chapter 13: Meiosis and Sexual Life Cycles Concept 13.1 Offspring acquire genes from parents by inheriting chromosomes 1. Let s begin with a review of several terms that you may already know.

More information

DNA, RNA, Protein synthesis, and Mutations. Chapters 12-13.3

DNA, RNA, Protein synthesis, and Mutations. Chapters 12-13.3 DNA, RNA, Protein synthesis, and Mutations Chapters 12-13.3 1A)Identify the components of DNA and explain its role in heredity. DNA s Role in heredity: Contains the genetic information of a cell that can

More information

Basic Concepts Recombinant DNA Use with Chapter 13, Section 13.2

Basic Concepts Recombinant DNA Use with Chapter 13, Section 13.2 Name Date lass Master 19 Basic oncepts Recombinant DN Use with hapter, Section.2 Formation of Recombinant DN ut leavage Splicing opyright lencoe/mcraw-hill, a division of he Mcraw-Hill ompanies, Inc. Bacterial

More information

SNP Essentials The same SNP story

SNP Essentials The same SNP story HOW SNPS HELP RESEARCHERS FIND THE GENETIC CAUSES OF DISEASE SNP Essentials One of the findings of the Human Genome Project is that the DNA of any two people, all 3.1 billion molecules of it, is more than

More information

Recipient Cell. DNA Foreign DNA. Recombinant DNA

Recipient Cell. DNA Foreign DNA. Recombinant DNA Module 4B Biotechnology In this module, we will examine some of the techniques scientists have developed to study and manipulate the DNA of living organisms. Objective # 7 Explain what genetic recombination

More information

Fact Sheet 14 EPIGENETICS

Fact Sheet 14 EPIGENETICS This fact sheet describes epigenetics which refers to factors that can influence the way our genes are expressed in the cells of our body. In summary Epigenetics is a phenomenon that affects the way cells

More information

1 Mutation and Genetic Change

1 Mutation and Genetic Change CHAPTER 14 1 Mutation and Genetic Change SECTION Genes in Action KEY IDEAS As you read this section, keep these questions in mind: What is the origin of genetic differences among organisms? What kinds

More information

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON HARMONISATION OF TECHNICAL REQUIREMENTS FOR REGISTRATION OF PHARMACEUTICALS FOR HUMAN USE Q5B

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON HARMONISATION OF TECHNICAL REQUIREMENTS FOR REGISTRATION OF PHARMACEUTICALS FOR HUMAN USE Q5B INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON HARMONISATION OF TECHNICAL REQUIREMENTS FOR REGISTRATION OF PHARMACEUTICALS FOR HUMAN USE ICH HARMONISED TRIPARTITE GUIDELINE QUALITY OF BIOTECHNOLOGICAL PRODUCTS: ANALYSIS

More information

High-throughput sequencing and big data: implications for personalized medicine?

High-throughput sequencing and big data: implications for personalized medicine? High-throughput sequencing and big data: implications for personalized medicine? Dominick J. Lemas, PhD Postdoctoral Fellow in Pediatrics - Neonatology Mentor: Jacob E. (Jed) Friedman, PhD What is Big

More information

The world of non-coding RNA. Espen Enerly

The world of non-coding RNA. Espen Enerly The world of non-coding RNA Espen Enerly ncrna in general Different groups Small RNAs Outline mirnas and sirnas Speculations Common for all ncrna Per def.: never translated Not spurious transcripts Always/often

More information

A Genomic Timeline Tim Shank 2003

A Genomic Timeline Tim Shank 2003 A Genomic Timeline Tim Shank 2003 1800s 1865 Gregor Mendel reports the results of his pea plant expts, from which he discerned several fundamental laws of heredity. His results appeared in an obscure journal

More information

Biotechnology: DNA Technology & Genomics

Biotechnology: DNA Technology & Genomics Chapter 20. Biotechnology: DNA Technology & Genomics 2003-2004 The BIG Questions How can we use our knowledge of DNA to: diagnose disease or defect? cure disease or defect? change/improve organisms? What

More information

Mutations: 2 general ways to alter DNA. Mutations. What is a mutation? Mutations are rare. Changes in a single DNA base. Change a single DNA base

Mutations: 2 general ways to alter DNA. Mutations. What is a mutation? Mutations are rare. Changes in a single DNA base. Change a single DNA base Mutations Mutations: 2 general ways to alter DNA Change a single DNA base Or entire sections of DNA can move from one place to another What is a mutation? Any change in the nucleotide sequence of DNA Here

More information

a mutation that occurs during meiosis results in a chromosomal abnormality B.

a mutation that occurs during meiosis results in a chromosomal abnormality B. Biotechnology 1. Which of the following is an example of gene splicing? a segment of human DNA is inserted into the DNA sequence of a bacterium a mutation that occurs during meiosis results in a chromosomal

More information

RNA and Protein Synthesis

RNA and Protein Synthesis Name lass Date RN and Protein Synthesis Information and Heredity Q: How does information fl ow from DN to RN to direct the synthesis of proteins? 13.1 What is RN? WHT I KNOW SMPLE NSWER: RN is a nucleic

More information

Crime Scenes and Genes

Crime Scenes and Genes Glossary Agarose Biotechnology Cell Chromosome DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) Electrophoresis Gene Micro-pipette Mutation Nucleotide Nucleus PCR (Polymerase chain reaction) Primer STR (short tandem repeats)

More information

DNA Damage and Repair

DNA Damage and Repair infoaging guides BIOLOGY OF AGING DNA Damage and Repair An introduction to aging science brought to you by the American Federation for Aging Research DNA BASICS DNA stands for deoxyribonucleic acid. The

More information

4.1 Cell Division and Genetic Material pg The Cell Theory is a central idea to Biology and it evolved in the 1800 s. The Cell Theory States:

4.1 Cell Division and Genetic Material pg The Cell Theory is a central idea to Biology and it evolved in the 1800 s. The Cell Theory States: 4.1 Cell Division and Genetic Material pg. 160 The Cell Theory is a central idea to Biology and it evolved in the 1800 s. The Cell Theory States: 1. All living things are composed of one or more cells.

More information

Immunology Ambassador Guide (updated 2014)

Immunology Ambassador Guide (updated 2014) Immunology Ambassador Guide (updated 2014) Immunity and Disease We will talk today about the immune system and how it protects us from disease. Also, we ll learn some unique ways that our immune system

More information

Genetic Testing in Research & Healthcare

Genetic Testing in Research & Healthcare We Innovate Healthcare Genetic Testing in Research & Healthcare We Innovate Healthcare Genetic Testing in Research and Healthcare Human genetic testing is a growing science. It is used to study genes

More information

RETRIEVING SEQUENCE INFORMATION. Nucleotide sequence databases. Database search. Sequence alignment and comparison

RETRIEVING SEQUENCE INFORMATION. Nucleotide sequence databases. Database search. Sequence alignment and comparison RETRIEVING SEQUENCE INFORMATION Nucleotide sequence databases Database search Sequence alignment and comparison Biological sequence databases Originally just a storage place for sequences. Currently the

More information

Chapter 20: Biotechnology: DNA Technology & Genomics

Chapter 20: Biotechnology: DNA Technology & Genomics Biotechnology Chapter 20: Biotechnology: DNA Technology & Genomics The BIG Questions How can we use our knowledge of DNA to: o Diagnose disease or defect? o Cure disease or defect? o Change/improve organisms?

More information

CHAPTER 6: RECOMBINANT DNA TECHNOLOGY YEAR III PHARM.D DR. V. CHITRA

CHAPTER 6: RECOMBINANT DNA TECHNOLOGY YEAR III PHARM.D DR. V. CHITRA CHAPTER 6: RECOMBINANT DNA TECHNOLOGY YEAR III PHARM.D DR. V. CHITRA INTRODUCTION DNA : DNA is deoxyribose nucleic acid. It is made up of a base consisting of sugar, phosphate and one nitrogen base.the

More information

DNA and Forensic Science

DNA and Forensic Science DNA and Forensic Science Micah A. Luftig * Stephen Richey ** I. INTRODUCTION This paper represents a discussion of the fundamental principles of DNA technology as it applies to forensic testing. A brief

More information

Introduction to Bioinformatics 3. DNA editing and contig assembly

Introduction to Bioinformatics 3. DNA editing and contig assembly Introduction to Bioinformatics 3. DNA editing and contig assembly Benjamin F. Matthews United States Department of Agriculture Soybean Genomics and Improvement Laboratory Beltsville, MD 20708 matthewb@ba.ars.usda.gov

More information

Chapter 5. Genetic Models. Organization and Expression of Immunoglobulin Genes. The two-gene model: Models to Explain Antibody Diversity

Chapter 5. Genetic Models. Organization and Expression of Immunoglobulin Genes. The two-gene model: Models to Explain Antibody Diversity Chapter 5 Organization and Expression of Immunoglobulin Genes 3 4 5 6 Genetic Models How to account for : ) Vast diversity of antibody specificities ) Presence of Variable regions at the amino end of Heavy

More information

Lecture 5 Mutation and Genetic Variation

Lecture 5 Mutation and Genetic Variation 1 Lecture 5 Mutation and Genetic Variation I. Review of DNA structure and function you should already know this. A. The Central Dogma DNA mrna Protein where the mistakes are made. 1. Some definitions based

More information

The National Institute of Genomic Medicine (INMEGEN) was

The National Institute of Genomic Medicine (INMEGEN) was Genome is...... the complete set of genetic information contained within all of the chromosomes of an organism. It defines the particular phenotype of an individual. What is Genomics? The study of the

More information

Genetic Technology. Name: Class: Date: Multiple Choice Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question.

Genetic Technology. Name: Class: Date: Multiple Choice Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question. Name: Class: Date: Genetic Technology Multiple Choice Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question. 1. An application of using DNA technology to help environmental scientists

More information

DNA and the Cell. Version 2.3. English version. ELLS European Learning Laboratory for the Life Sciences

DNA and the Cell. Version 2.3. English version. ELLS European Learning Laboratory for the Life Sciences DNA and the Cell Anastasios Koutsos Alexandra Manaia Julia Willingale-Theune Version 2.3 English version ELLS European Learning Laboratory for the Life Sciences Anastasios Koutsos, Alexandra Manaia and

More information

Lecture 38: DNA Fingerprinting

Lecture 38: DNA Fingerprinting Lecture 38: DNA Fingerprinting (DNA technology) The most awesome and powerful tool acquired by man since the splitting of atoms - The Time Magazine (USA) Conventional fingerprint of an individual comes

More information

How many of you have checked out the web site on protein-dna interactions?

How many of you have checked out the web site on protein-dna interactions? How many of you have checked out the web site on protein-dna interactions? Example of an approximately 40,000 probe spotted oligo microarray with enlarged inset to show detail. Find and be ready to discuss

More information

DNA Technology Mapping a plasmid digesting How do restriction enzymes work?

DNA Technology Mapping a plasmid digesting How do restriction enzymes work? DNA Technology Mapping a plasmid A first step in working with DNA is mapping the DNA molecule. One way to do this is to use restriction enzymes (restriction endonucleases) that are naturally found in bacteria

More information

HC70A & SAS70A Winter 2016 Genetic Engineering in Medicine, Agriculture, and Law Professors Bob Goldberg, & John Harada

HC70A & SAS70A Winter 2016 Genetic Engineering in Medicine, Agriculture, and Law Professors Bob Goldberg, & John Harada HC70A & SAS70A Winter 2016 Genetic Engineering in Medicine, Agriculture, and Law Professors Bob Goldberg, & John Harada Lecture 4 What Are Genes & How Do They Work: Part Two Course Administratorp Last

More information

2. Enzymes that cleave DNA at specific sites are called.

2. Enzymes that cleave DNA at specific sites are called. Biotechnology 1. The most recent techniques developed in the biological sciences allow the manipulation of DNA with the ultimate goal of intervening directly with the fate of organisms. 2. Enzymes that

More information

Replication Study Guide

Replication Study Guide Replication Study Guide This study guide is a written version of the material you have seen presented in the replication unit. Self-reproduction is a function of life that human-engineered systems have

More information

Appendix 2 Molecular Biology Core Curriculum. Websites and Other Resources

Appendix 2 Molecular Biology Core Curriculum. Websites and Other Resources Appendix 2 Molecular Biology Core Curriculum Websites and Other Resources Chapter 1 - The Molecular Basis of Cancer 1. Inside Cancer http://www.insidecancer.org/ From the Dolan DNA Learning Center Cold

More information

European Medicines Agency

European Medicines Agency European Medicines Agency July 1996 CPMP/ICH/139/95 ICH Topic Q 5 B Quality of Biotechnological Products: Analysis of the Expression Construct in Cell Lines Used for Production of r-dna Derived Protein

More information

History of DNA Sequencing & Current Applications

History of DNA Sequencing & Current Applications History of DNA Sequencing & Current Applications Christopher McLeod President & CEO, 454 Life Sciences, A Roche Company IMPORTANT NOTICE Intended Use Unless explicitly stated otherwise, all Roche Applied

More information

Control of Gene Expression

Control of Gene Expression Control of Gene Expression What is Gene Expression? Gene expression is the process by which informa9on from a gene is used in the synthesis of a func9onal gene product. What is Gene Expression? Figure

More information

The vast majority of RNA functions are concerned with protein synthesis.

The vast majority of RNA functions are concerned with protein synthesis. RNA Structure, Function, and Synthesis RNA RNA differs from DNA in both structural and functional respects. RNA has two major structural differences: each of the ribose rings contains a 2 -hydroxyl, and

More information

Biology 160 Lab Module 10 Meiosis Activity & Mendelian Genetics

Biology 160 Lab Module 10 Meiosis Activity & Mendelian Genetics Name Biology 160 Lab Module 10 Meiosis Activity & Mendelian Genetics Introduction During your lifetime you have grown from a single celled zygote into an organism made up of trillions of cells. The vast

More information

Forensic DNA Testing Terminology

Forensic DNA Testing Terminology Forensic DNA Testing Terminology ABI 310 Genetic Analyzer a capillary electrophoresis instrument used by forensic DNA laboratories to separate short tandem repeat (STR) loci on the basis of their size.

More information

Heredity - Patterns of Inheritance

Heredity - Patterns of Inheritance Heredity - Patterns of Inheritance Genes and Alleles A. Genes 1. A sequence of nucleotides that codes for a special functional product a. Transfer RNA b. Enzyme c. Structural protein d. Pigments 2. Genes

More information

FACULTY OF MEDICAL SCIENCE

FACULTY OF MEDICAL SCIENCE Doctor of Philosophy Program in Microbiology FACULTY OF MEDICAL SCIENCE Naresuan University 171 Doctor of Philosophy Program in Microbiology The time is critical now for graduate education and research

More information